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Full text of "The Heritage Lodge no. 730, A.F. & A.M., G.R.C. : proceedings 1978-1979"

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INSTITUTED CONSTITUTED 

Sept. 21, 1977 JL ^ JL Sept * ' 19?8 



cob Pos JL A JU J * A - Faulkner 

W.M. - Designate >« £\ >T 3ec*y - Designate 



10 Mayfield Ave., yOT^XV 22 Echo Drive » 

Guelph, Ontario, ^ ^(1mD^> & Guelph, Ontario, 

NIG 2L8 3^&3£^L * NIG 1H2 

(519) 821-4995 ^ ^^^ ^ (519) 824 " 287 3 

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Vol. 02, No. 01 Cambridge, Ontario, Canada September, 1978 

This Bulletin includes the Summons for the next Regular 
Communication, the Proceedings of the Fourth Regular Meeting held on 
Wednesday, May 17th, 1978, and important announcements for the coming 
year. 

SUMMONS 

Dear Sir and Brother: 

I am directed by the Worshipful Master to request your 
;tendance at a Regular Communication of The Heritage Lodge No. 730 » 
to be held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple at the north-east 
corner of the intersection of Highways 401 and 24 on 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 20, 1978, AT 7:30 p.m. 

prompt for the purpose of transacting such business as may be regularly 
brought before the Lodge. This will be an important meeting as we plan 
our program for the coming year. Two short papers will be presented: 
one by R,W.Bro. Fred G. Daniells, titled "The Lost Art Of Rhetoric", 
and the other by V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos. dealing with the "Near - Crisis 
Situation of the Montreal Masonic Temple" of the Grand Lodge of Quebec. 
Both of these presentations will afford ample opportunity for 
discussion. 



GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 



,,„ ___„., 

the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, on Monday, September 11th, 1978, 
at 7: 30 p.m. Of major concern at this time is the planning and 
arrangements for the upcoming Constitution and Consecration Banquet 
and Ceremonies to be held on September 23rd, 1978, and a proposed 
draft of the Lodge By-Laws. All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Standing 
and Appointed Committees are urgently requested to attend. All Members 
the Lodge are most welcome. 



of the 



Fraternally yours, 
James A. Faulkner, Sec'y 



PROCEEDINGS 

The Fourth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge U.D. was held 
in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, May 17, 
1978, with 13 Officers, 37 Members and 105 Visitors as per Lodge 
Register. 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 8:05 p.m. The 
Worshipful Master expressed his pleasure at seeing such a large turn- 
out and assured the Brethren that their expectation for an instructive 
and enjoyable evening would be favourably rewarded. 

Sight Worshipful Masters representing the following Lodges: 
St John's 35, Doric 121, Guelph 258, New Hope 279, Preston 297, 
Occident 346, Concord 722, and Wellington Square 725, were received 
in due and ample form. 

R.W.Bro. Ron Groshaw, acting as D.C. was again admitted to 
introduce; R.W.Bro. Charles F. Grimwood, D.D.G.M. of Waterloo District 
accompanied by R.W.Bros; Frank Bruce, Verne Young, Wallace McLeod, 
Charles Sankey and V.W.Bro. Roy Hamer, all of our Grand Jurisdiction; 
and R.W.Bro. R. Stott, P. D.D.G.M., Grand Lodge of New York, Utica, 
New York; and V.W.Bro. Harry Carr of the United Grand Lodge Of England 
and former Secretary of the Quatuor Coronati Lodge No. 2076, London, 
England. All were received with dignity and decorum. 

Appologies were received from R.W.Bros. N.R. Richards, Roy S, 
Sparrow and G. Ivor Davies. 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn, seconded by 
Bro. George Zwicker, that the minutes of the Third Regular Meeting of 
the Lodge be adopted as circulated. Carried. 

The reports of the Committees on Petitions for the Application! 
for Affiliation, as recorded in the Minutes of the Third Regular 
Meeting, reported favourable to all applicants. 

It was regularly moved by V.W.Bro. Randall Langs, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. Don Grinton, that the Reports be received, the Committees 
discharged with the thanks of the lodge, and the applications balloted 
on. Carried. 

Eleven items of correspondence were received and are summarize* 
as follows: 

1. From R.W.Bro. Fred Bowery of Brant District, suggesting a 
procedure of appointing investigating committees on a 

District basis, and his offer to serve in that capacity for the 
District of Brant. 

2. From V.W.Bro Harry Carr of London England, thanking us for 
sending the Proceedings of our Lodge and expressing the hopi 
that he would be able to visit with us on May 17, 1978. 

3- From W.Bro. S. Thurtell of Wilson District, a brief report 
on the progress of the crest design for our Lodge Seal and 
Stationary, and his intent to have the work completed 
before our next meeting. 

*K FromR .'.v.Bro. Wallace McLeod of Toronto District 7, a report 
of his findings concerning the lecture schedule of V.W.3ro. 



Harry Carr and that it appeared (as of March 16th) that 
May 17th, 1978, would be free and that R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce 
would be bringing Bro. Carr to our Regular Meeting in May. 

5. From R.W.Bro. Charles Grimwood, D.D.G.M. of Waterloo 
District, a very complimentary report expressing his 
pleasure and satisfaction following his Official Visit to 
the Lodge on Wednesday, March 15 t 1978. He concluded by 
stating that he would be recommending to the Grand Secreta: 
and through him to the Grand Lodge Committee on Warrants 
that our Lodge be granted a Charter at the next Regular 
Communication of that Body. 

6. From R.W.Bro. Ray Gunsolus, Secretary of The Bellville 
Lodge No. 123» extending to us an invitation to make a 
fraternal visit to their Lodge on May 18th, or June 1st, 
1978. 

7. From Bro. Donald Allan, of Toronto District 7, outlining 
his actions in promoting the upcoming May 17th, meeting of 
The Heritage Lodge, and that he would be bringing a number 
of visitors with him. 

8. From M.W.Bro. J. A. Irvine, the Grand Secretary, granting 
permission, on behalf of the Grand Master, to exemplify 
the 18th Century Degree in the Lodge on May 17 1 1978. 

9. Copy of a letter from R.W.Bro. J.C. Guy, Office of the 
Grand Secretary, dated April 25th, 1978, and addressed to 
R.W.Bro. Charles Grimwood, advising that the Grand Master 
had given his approval for the schedule of events (as 
appearing in our most recent Summons, Vol. 01, No. 03) for 
the Constitution and Consecration of The Heritage Lodge U.D, 
and The Otto Klotz Lodge U.D., on Saturday, September 23rd, 
1978. Also included in the correspondence were instructions 
for the Ceremonies. 

10. From T. John Arthur, Secretary-Treasurer of The Masonic 
Foundation of Ontario, thanking us for a generous donation, 
also a receipt for our contribution in the amount of 

$100.00. 

11. From R.W.Bro. Ross Hepburn, Christchurch, New Zealand, 
extending congratulations for an excellent publication. He 
would like us to extend his best wishes to Brother Carr, 
who has been most helpful to him over the years. 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Don Grinton, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. David Bradley, that the. proper Warrants be issued to the 
Treasurer, and the following accounts be paid accordingly. Carried. 

Secretary's Account: 

Postage , $48 . 82 

Envelopes, 3.30 

Ledger sheets (100), 5.85 ($57-97) 

Mrs. Karen Perry, Fergus, Ont. : 

Typing April Proceedings, ... 11.25 

Kopy Print, Guelph, Ont.,: 

May Summons (250 copies), ... 32.00 

Senior Stewards Account: 

Refreshments (May 17 meeting) 2^.00 

Total 125.22 



- 4 - 

The following Applications for Affiliation were received 
from: 

1. BUNKER, W. Gordon; 51 Pinehurst Rd., R .R . #2, Oshawa, Ont. ; 
Age 88; Retired; Member of Lebanon Lodge No. 139, G.R.C.; Recommended 
by Bro. Robt. S. Throop and R.W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw. 

2. BURNETT, John Maver; 444 Duncan St., Wallaceburg, Ont.; 
Age 71; Accountant; Member of Rodney Lodge No. 411, G.R.C.; Recommendec 
by R.W.Bro. Edsel Steen and R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod. 

3. BURTON, Lile Louis; 1092 Dunnegan St., Woodstock, Ont.; 
Age 36; Salesman; Member of St. John's Lodge No. 82, G.R.C.; 
Recommended by Bro. C.R. Burton and Bro. W.H. Wells. 

4. COWAN, F. Harold; 544 Allanburg Rd. , Thorold, Ont.; Age 69; 
Retired; Member of Mountain Masonic Lodge No. 221, G.R.C.; Recommended, 
by Bro. Marvin Campbell and 3ro. George A. Campbell. 

5. DOWSETT, Harry John; 97 Elmwood Ave., Willowdale , Ont.; 
Age 79; Retired; Member of Belford Lodge No. 638, G.R.C.; Recommended 
by R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod and W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley . 

6. GEORGE, A. Brian; Joseph Street, Cayuga, Ont.; Age 51; 
Construction 'Worker; Member of Fort William Lodge No. 415, G.R.C.; 
Recommended by W.Bro. Allan Smith and V. W.Bro. Bruce A. Hedley. 

7. GRAVELLE, Clifford John; 36 Else St., St. Catharines, Ont.; 
Age 44; Teacher; Member of Maple Leaf Lodge No. 103, G .R .C . :Recommende< 
by Bro. George A. Campbell and R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod. 

8. HAYES, James Noble; 4 Cypress Crt., Complex I96, McGregor, 
Ont.; Age 57; Electrical Technician; Member of Palace Lodge No. 604, 
G.R.C.; Recommended by W.Bro. James A. Faulkner and V. W.Bro. J. Pos. 

9. LUNNEY, Richard Michael; 1110 - 2200 Avenue Rd. , Toronto, 
Ont.; Age 32; Banker; Member of Metropolitan Lodge No. 542, G.R.C.; 
Recommended by R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod and R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson. 

10. McLELCAH, Kenneth Colin; 71 Thorncliffe Park Dr., Toronto, 
Ont.; Age 57 l Real Estate Broker; Member of Harry L. Martyn Lodge No. 
696, G.R.C.; Recommended by R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod and M. W.Bro. Wm. m 
Bailey. 

11. MAJOR, Francis James Melville; Apt 307, 21 Lascelles Blvd., 
Toronto, Ont.; Age 60; Bank Inspector; Member of Huron Bruce Lodge 
No. 611, G.R.C.; Recommended by R.W.Bro. J.W. Gerrard and v. W.Bro. J. I 
Pos. 

12. R0BS0N, Robert; 14 Richard St., St. Catharines, Ont.j Age 
62; Retired; Member of Grantham Lodge No. 697, G.R.C.; Recommended 
by Bro. George A. Campbell and R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod. 

13. SILLS, Harold Bertrand; 27 Lennox St., Kingston, Ont., Age 
j0; employed by Dupont of Canada; Member of Albion Lodge No. 109, G.RJ 
C; Recommended by W.BRo. B. LeGresley and W.Bro. Allan Cohoe. 

14. ST0RRIE, John; 91 Croydon Dr., St. Catharines, Ont.; Age 6$} 
Retired; Member of Adonac Lodge No. 6l4, G.R.C.; Recommended by Bro. 
Marvin Campbell and R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey. 

1 -5- TAYLOR, Leonard Hubert; 2531 Whaley Dr., Mississauga, Ont.: 
Age 58; General Sales Manager; Member of Bedford Lodge No. 638, G.R.C 
rtecommended by R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod and M. W.Bro.* Wm.K. Bailey. 



- 5 - 

16. THORONTON, Donald R.j I67 Sherman St., Kingston, Ont. ; Age 
43; Teacher; Member of Prince Arthur Lodge No. 228, G.R.C.; Recommended 
by W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley and W.Bro. Allan Cohoe. 

17. WOODBURN, C. John; 1379 Birchview Dr., Mississauga, Ont.; 
Age ^2; Salesman; Member of Kingsway Lodge No. 655, G.R.C.; Recommended 
by R. W.Bro. Wallace McLeod and M. W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey. 

It was regularly moved by R. W.Bro. Wallace McLeod, seconded by 
R. W.Bro. Charles Drew, that the Applications be received and the usual 
committees appointed. Carried. 

W. Bro. Stewart Thurtell, Chairman of the Committee on Lodge 
Seal and Banner, reported that he had finally been successful in 
obtaining a graphic illustration of the Lodge Seal, as approved at the 
Regular Meeting of the Lodge in November, 1977. However, colour 
separation overlays were still to be prepared. W.Bro. Thurtell brought 
along the Artist's final production for viewing by the Brethren. 

R. W.Bro. W.E. Wilson presented the Treasurer's Report. In 
summary he stated that, while the Lodge was still operating in the 
"black", there would be several expenses before next fall which could 
ieplete the operating account; therefore, he continued, it would be 
oeneficial to the Lodge if some of the Brethren could pay their next 
year's dues. 

The Worshipful Master again outlined the difficulty in 
appointing investigating Committees and expressed his desire to have 
one person from each District act as a Liaison on behalf of the Lodge. 
Volunteers were urgently needed. 

He also reminded the Brethren that the Lodge had not formerly 
established a proper fee for Initiation. 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, seconded by 
R. W.Bro. Keith Flynn, that the Initiation Fee for membership in The 
Heritage Lodge U.D. be set at $500.00. Carried. 

It was regularly moved by R. W.Bro. Charles Fotheringham, 
seconded by R. W.Bro. Charles Drew, that the Treasurer transfer $100.00 
from our operating account to R. W.Bro. Wm. 3. McVittie, who is acting 
as Secretary-Treasurer of the combined Committee representing The 
Heritage Lodge U.D. and The Otto Klotz Lodge U.D., for the planning of 
the Constitution and Consecration Banquet to be held September 23, 
1978. Carried. 

The Worshipful Master asked for two volunteers to assist in 
directing traffic for parking cars on that occasion. 

The Brethren were again reminded to sign the Lodge Register. 



In discussing the proposed visit to Bellville Lodge No. 123, 
the Worshipful Master stated that following the recommendation of the 
General Purpose Committee, he had written to R. W.Bro. Gonsolus, Sec'y 
of Bellville Lodge requesting that the date of the proposed visit be 
held over until June of 1979 to give us time to prepare a suitable 
paper, fitting for the occasion and of local interest. 



•y 



Following a favourable ballot on all applications taken 
collectively, the Worshipful Master declared: R.W.Bros. Harry Greenwood 
and Leonard Meiler; W.Bros. Harry W. Chi vers, Gordon Durnford, Colin 
Fraser, Reginald Glass, John R. Payette, Evan Alexander Rawling and 



' 



Charles Leonard Tugwellj and Bros. Stephen Bobrovitz, Earl William 
Gillespie, Ronald Lucy, William A. Martin, Angelo Oscar Mi or, Peter 
Morrison, John Storey and John Edward Taylor; elegible for membership 
in The Heritage Lodge U.D. by Affiliation and upon payment of the 
proper fee. 

At this time the Worshipful Master called on V.W.Bro. Randall 
Langs to assume the gavel . 

The Lodge was called from labour to refreshment at 9:20 p.m. 
to permit the lodge room to be prepared for the exemplification of the 
18th Century Degree. 

An introduction to the work of the evening was presented by 
V.W.Bro. J. Pos, following which a portrayal of a lodge meeting of th« 
Lodge of Charity, held in the Devil's Tavern on Bartholomew Lane at 
eight of the clock on the ninth day of May 177^-t was presented as we: 
as the Initiation Ceremony. The fourteen member cast, in full costumes 
of the period, consisted of Brethren from Wellington District. 

Following the dramatization, which took about 75 minutes, V, 
Bro. .Harry Carr complimented the Cast on a beautiful performance and 
added further comment on several historic points. 

The Lodge was called from refreshment to labour at 11:15 p.m, 

Following several announcements and a reminder that the 18th 
Century Cast would remain in costume for a few minutes for those who 
may wish to take pictures, the lodge was closed in harmony at 11:20 
p.m. and adjourned for refreshments in the banquet hall. 



DEPARTED BRETHREN 



R.W.Bro. Charles Fotheringham 

Borne: Longbenton, England, 1894 . 
Initiated: Port Elgin Lodge No. 429, 1931 
D.D.G.M., Bruce Masonic District, 1943 
Member of Palmer Lodge NO. 372, Fort Erie 
Lodge NO. 613; member and organist of The 
Grand River Lodge NO. 151, Waterloo Lodge 
NO. 539, Brotherhood Lodge NO. 723, Cambridge 
Lodge NO. 728, The Heritage Lodge NO. 730 j 
and Steward of The Otto Klotz Lodge NO. 731. 

Passed to the Grand Lodge, June 24, 1978 
WE CHERISH HIS MEMORY 



FROM THE EAST 



Dear Brethren: 

The 123rd Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge A.F.& A.M. 
of Canada in the Province of Ontario, was held July 19-20, 1978. 
ihe members of the Lodge will be pleased to learn that no less than 
10 of its members were nominees for Grand Lodge and the Board of 
general purposes. We commend the Brethren for their committment to 
rreemasonry and their active participation in the democratic process 



of the selection of its leaders. Special congratulations are extended 
to R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod and R.W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw on their 
election to the Board of General Purposes, and R.W.Bro. Allan 
Broadley and R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey for their appointment to the 
Board. 

Two of our members, R.W.Bro. Gary Powell and R.W.Bro. Edmund 
Ralph were elected as District Deputy Grand Masters of Wellington 
District and Toronto District 5 respectively. We wish them a very 
successful and rewarding year and offer them our fullest support. 

Congratulations are also extended to V.W.Bro. Stewart 
Thurtell and V.W.Bro. James Lumley on their appointment as Grand 
Stewards. We are pleased to note their faithful service is recognized. 

Other members of our Lodge who continue to devote their time 
and energies for the benefit of Freemasonry in various capacities in 
Grand Lodge include, R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards, Deputy Grand Master; 
M.W.Bro. James N. Allan, who has been appointed Grand Treasurer; 
M.W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey, as Custodian of the Work; and R.W.Bro. J.B. 
Hunter, who continues as a member of the Board of General Purposes. 
The example portrayed by all our Brethren in their devotion to duty 
and their work on the various Committees of Grand Lodge on which 
they serve, in promoting the fundamental principles and tenents of 
our fraternity, is an inspiration for us all. 

Now that the summer break is over for most of us, I trust 
that you will have all enjoyed a pleasant and relaxing vacation. The 
holiday season is a time for rest from the cares of our daily work 
and a time to revitalize our energies for the coming year. For many 
of us, itfTs also a time to plan and organize our masonic programs 
for the fall and winter seasons. 

Of particular interest to the Members of The Heritage Lodge 
NO. 730, and which, if you did not attend the Annual Communication of 
Grand Lodge, you will no doubt have assumed from the heading of these 
Proceedings, is that our Petition for a Warrant of Constitution has 
been approved and that we have been numbered NO.730 on the Register 
of the Grand Lodge. Our Sister Lodge, The Otto Klotz Lodge, which 
meets in the same Temple, has been numbered NO. 731 • 

The timing of the Joint Banquet and the separate Constitution 
and Consecration Ceremonies, all on the same day, poses some close 
scheduling, and will require our immediate attention. Therefore a 
proposed schedule of events, prior to and including our fall activ- 
ities has been submitted to the Grand Secretary. M.W.Bro. J. A. 
Irvine, in prompt response by correspondence dated July 28, has 
concurred with the general program, which is outlined in greater 
detail as f ollows : 

1. That the schedule of dates as listed below be discussed 
at a meeting of the General Purpose Committee to be held on Monday, 
Septemberllth, 1978, at 7:30 p.m., in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple; and if accepted, to be presented for approval by the Members 
of the Lodge at the Regular Meeting in .September. 

The By-Laws Committee will be presenting a rough proposed 
draft of the Lodge By-Laws for preliminary approval before copies 
are circulated to the members. Further details for the Joint Const- 
itutional Dinner and Ceremonies will be finalized at this meeting. 



- 8 - 



2. At the Regular Meeting on September 20th, 1978, at 7O0 
p.m., two short papers will be presented as described above in the 
Lodge Summons. 

Since we will not have been Constituted by this date, we 
will still be operating in accordance with the Book of Constitution. 
However, by this time, we .hope you will have received a rough draft 
of our proposed By-Laws and will have had sufficient time to review 
them before the meeting, so as to be able to discuss any changes 
that may be required before final approval at the next Regular 
Meeting in October. 

3. Saturday, September 23rd, 1978, marks a most important 
landmark in the Histories of both The Heritage Lodge NO. 730, and 
The Otto Klotz Lodge NO. 731. Four significant events will take 
place as follows: 

3.1, At 3O0 p.m., the Ceremony of Constitution and Consec- 
ration will take place for The Otto Klotz Lodge NO. 731 » at the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, under the direction of M.W.Bro. 
Robert E. Davies, Grand Master. 

3.2, At 5i^5 p.m. sharp, the combined Constitution Dinner 
for both Lodges will be held at the Matador Tavern, 250 Hespeler 
Road, Cambridge-Gait, it is located just 2.3 miles (3*7 km) south 
of the Temple. 

Tickets for the Banquet are .^9.00 each, and may be obtained 
from any of the Officers of both Lodges or from W.Bro. Harvey Jones, 
202 Winston Blvd., Cambridge-Hespeler, N3C 1M3, telephone (519) 
658-2677. As there are but two Lodges in our Grand Jurisdiction to 
be Constituted and Consecrated this year, and both on the same day 
in the same Temple, with a combined Constitutional Dinner, you are 
advised to secure your tickets as soon as possible. 

3.3, At 8:15 p.m. prompt, the Ceremony of Constitution and 
Consecration will take place for The Heritage Lodge NO. 730, at the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, under the direction of M.W.Bro. 
Robert E. Davies, Grand Master. 

3.^, At 9:15 p.m., the Installation and Investiture of the 
Worshipful Master and Officers of The Heritage Lodge NO. 730, will 
take place immediately after the Ceremony of Constitution and 
Consecration. M.W.Bro. William K. Bailey will be the Installing 
Master. 

k. On Wednesday, October 18th, 1978, at 7O0 p.m., a Regular 
Meeting of the Lodge will be held in the Temple to approve the By- 
Laws and to Elect the new Officers for the year 1978-79. 

Arrangements are underway to secure a masonic film titled 
"Precious Heritage" from the Grand Lodge of Ohio. 

Quatuor Coronati Lodge NO. 2076 

A large number of our members in Ontario South and West are 
also members of the Correspondence Circle of Quatuor Coronati Lodge 
NO. 2076, London, England, They will be receiving with this mailing, 
their Annual Subscription Statement for 1 978- 79. 



- 9 - 

Following the fatal heart attack of W.Bro. Oliver T. Flint, 
on January 10th, 1978, the Lodge was without a Secretary for Ontario 
South and West. After several discussions with R. W.Bro. N.R. Richards, 
Prof. J.S. Basarke, Secretary for Toronto, and the Principal Officers 
of our Lodge, it was generally agreed that The Heritage Lodge, being 
a historical lodge with similar objectives, should assume this 
responsibility. Quatuor Coronati Lodge also agreed and recommended 
that a person's name and address be used for a direct contact. I have 
consequently allowed my name to be used for that purpose. And unless 
other proceedures are established, I shall endeavour, on behalf of 
The Heritage Lodge, to provide the service that was so ably and 
efficiently provided by W.Bro. Flint. His books and accounts were 
in excellent order and his service to Quatuor Coronati Lodge was a 
great loss. 

Any Master Mason wishing to become an Associate Member of 
the Correspondence Circle, may write to me for descriptive infor- 
mation and the necessary application form, simply enclose a self- 
addressed envelope with the minimum first class postage. 

The Brethren will be pleased to learn that R. W.Bro. Wallace 
McLeod' s paper "The Old Charges", which he presented at our Second 
Regular Meeting on November 16, 1977 i was reprinted in its entirety 
by the South Canterbury Lodge of Research NO. ^36, Midland District, 
New Zealand, in their June, 1978 issue, Vol. 9 NO. 5* We congratulate 
R. W.Bro. McLeod again for establishing in our first paper presentation 
such high standards. 

Brethren, the next three Regular Meetings will see the 
completion of the formal proceedings for the establishment of the 
first Historical Lodge operating as a Craft Lodge in our Grand 
Jurisdiction. We are indeed grateful to all those who have given so 
freely of their time and energies in the initial planning and to 
those v/ho have placed such confidence in our ambitions. However, 
while it may not be necessary to remind ourselves of the seven 
important objectives we have engaged ourselves to perform, we must 
recognize that our real task has only just begun. 

Now that the unique character of The Heritage Lodge has 
been accepted, we must be particularly attentive to insure that, 
with regard to paper presentations, we continue the high standards • 
established for us by R. W.Bro. McLeod. Similarly, the other areas of 
responsibility must be met with the same quality of performance. 

However, please do not let these demands discourage you 
from offering your assistance, on the contrary, all committees are 
urgently in need of reinforcements. Even if you think you do not have 
the talent, but feel you are interested, let us know. By working on 
Committees with experienced leaders you will insure a continuity 
of talent for the years ahead. Therefore, each member should give 
serious consideration to their individual attributes and aspirations, 
and volunteer your services to the Chairman of the appropriate 
Committee. 

Since our Lodge has been placed in Waterloo District, I would 
encourage as many members as possible to visit the other Lodges in 
the District. To assist in planning your itinerary, a copy of R.W. 
Bro. Burton 3. Freer' s Trestle for Waterloo District is enclosed 
with this summons. If you did not receive a copy (we are about ^0 
short for this mailing) and you would like to have one, please let 
us know. 



- 10 - 

We reprint the following talk which was given at the 
Melbourne Lodge of Research NO. 218, Victoria, Australia, on 31st 
f.Iarch, 1978. 

SYKB0LI3M IN THE CONSECRATION CEREMONY 

by 
R.W.Bro. The Very Reverend C.B. Alexander, P.S.G.W. 

The Ceremony of Consecration of a Lodge is always carried out 
by the Grand Master assisted by the Active Team of Grand Officers. 
The ceremonial is magnificent and the ritual very splendid; so much 
of it comes from the deep past of the human race yet its symbolism is 
quite modern in its meaning. Freemasonry may be historically only a 
few hundred years old, but the meaning of its teachings goes well 
back into the beginning of human society. 

Before the Grand Master and Grand Officers enter the Temple 
much preparatory work has been done, and Brethren have already 
assembled in the lodge room. The Lodge Board (table in the centre of 
the pavement) has been furnished with vessels of gold in which are 
contained the symbolic substances of corn, oil, wine and salt, and all 
is covered by pure white linen cloths. At the East end of the pavemenl 
is the station of the Grand Master; opposite, at the West end, is the 
station of the Senior Grand Warden. On the South side is the station 
of the Junior Grand Warden whilst the Grand Secretary is stationed on 
the North side. The station of the Deputy Grand Master is at the North- 
East corner. The Grand Master and the Deputy Grand Master are brought 
under the Wands to their respective stations. When all are at their 
stations they turn left and perambulate the Lodge Board for the first 
time v/hen the Deputy Grand Master addresses the Grand Master whilst 
handing him the golden Cornucopia: "In the ceremony of consecration 
it has been the immemorial custom toscatter corn upon the Lodge as an 

emblem of nourishment " The Grand Master then scatters corn from 

the Cornucopia on the floor with appropriate words. 

This vessel, the Cornucopia, "The Horn of Plenty" is shaped 
like a spiralling horn and was in great use in the early centuries. 
Its symbolism is derived from Greek mythology: the goat Almathea 
suckled the infant Zeus who became the king of the Olympian Gods. The 
Cornucopia has ever been the symbol of abundance and as such has been 
adopted as the jewel of the Stewards to remind them that it is their 
duty to see that the tables are properly furnished at refreshment, 
and that every brother is suitably served. 

Corn from which bread is made has always been considered "the 
staff of life" and is frequently mentioned in the Sacred Volume. In 
the ceremonial it symbolizes plenty and abundance and a grand blessing 
on the new Lodge. 

After the Lodge is perambulated the second time the Senior 
Warden presents the Grand Master with a cruet of Wine saying: "Wine, 
the emblem of refreshment, having been used by our ancient Brethren 

in the ceremony of Consecration, I present to you this vessel 

to be used according the Masonic form". Wine makes glad the hearts of 
men: It has been used for millenia in religious ceremonies as a 
symbol of joy and cheerfulness. It offers us good company and friend- 
liness. In the Jewish religion it is used in the ceremony of welcom- 
ing the Sabbath. In the Christian religion it is associated with 
Bread in being basic to the Sacrement of the Body and Blood of Christ 



- 11 - 

So out of the past we gather up links of symbolism in the bread and 
wine, symbols which are vital and very near to us. 

At the completion of the third procession the Junior Warden 
presents a cruet of oil to the Grand Master who pours oil on the 
Lodge, anointing it, saying: "I sprinkle oil as a symbol of peace and 
unanimity". Vie have heard and used the saying "to pour oil on troubled 
waters". In the hurly burly of life we have to learn to live in peace, 
harmony and unanimity with our fellow man. 

The Hebrews anointed their Kings, Prophets and High Priests 

with oil. We read in Psalm ^5: " God has anointed thee with 

the oil of gladness ....". The Tabernacle in the wilderness and all 
its holy vessels were anointed with oil. There is also the well-known 
story of David being chosen of all the sons of Jesse when Samuel 

heard the word of the Lord: " anoint him, for this is he. Then 

Samuel took the horn of oil and anointed him in the midst of his 
brethren". ( 1 Sam. 16) . David sings of "wine that maketh glad the 
heart of man, and oil to make his face to shine, and bread which 
strengtheneth man's heart". (Psalm 1C4). 

The rite of anointing with oil has descended to us from 
antiquity. During the coronation ceremonies of various nations, oil 
was poured out of the. horn and the king or queen was anointed. This 
is so with the Kings and Queens of England, For Freemasons, oil 
symbolizes that peace and harmony which guarantees the good order 
and life of society. 

At the conclusion of the fourth procession the Grand Secretary 
hands to the Grand Master the cellar containing Salt and says: "Most 
Worshipful Grand Master I present salt as an emblem of hospitality". 
The Grand Master then scatters salt on the floor of the Lodge and 
says: "I scatter salt on this Lodge as an emblem of hospitality and 
friendship and may the All-Bounteous Author of Nature bless the 
Brethren with an abundance of corn and wine and oil, and grant them 
all the comforts and .conveniences of life, and may every Brother 
visiting this Lodge be received with friendship and hospitality". 

To us, for whom salt is one of the commonest and cheapest of 
commodities, the importance attached to it by all peoples of antiquity 
seems disproportionate. Yet throughout recorded history salt has 
played a prominent part in social life, in magical ceremonies and in 

religious ritual. 

The Bible has many references to salt. Jesus said (Mat. 5) * 
"Ye are the salt of the earth, but if the salt have lost his savour, 
wherev/ith shall it be salted?" Ezra speaks of eating "the salt of the 
palace" as a synonm for hospitality. The "covenant of salt" represents 
a binding agreement (Nu. 18). This idea of salt as a seal set to a 
compact is all pervading in middle-eastern literature and legend. 
E is a symbol of preservation. In the consecration ceremony, it 
reminds us of the preservation cf the way of life we follow as Free- 
masons: the flavouring of our Lodge and life with the spirit of 
friendship, hospitality and true brotherhood. 

Immediately after the sprinkling of salt the Grand Master 
says: "To God and His service we consecrate this Lodge also to the 
memory of the Royal Solomon under whose auspices many of our Masonic 

mysteries had their 'origin" . 

Then follows the perambulation of the Lodge three times by the 
id Chaplain swinging the censer. The use of incense ^s part ui 






- 12 - 

divine worship and as a symbol of cleansing was common to all nations 
of antiquity. In scripture, incense is continually spoken of as a 
symbol of prayer: "let my prayer be set before thee as incense" (Psal- 
m 141). In Freemasonry incense has a similar connotation and also 
symbolizes the complete acceptance of our offering of the ceremony 
and the cleansing of all evil. 

Finally the Grand Master constitutes the Lodge and the 
ceremony is concluded with the Great Blessing (Nu. 6) : "The Lord 
bless thee and keep thee. The Lord make his face shine upon thee 
.... The Lord lift up his countenance and give thee peace". 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS £° 

1978 - 1979 /' 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 'fr 
M. W.Bro. Robert E. Davies 
P.O. Box 370, Mount Forest, NOG 2L0 



DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 
R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards 
59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2H4 

GRAND SECRETARY 
M . W . Bro . J . A . Irvine 
Drawer 217, Hamilton, Ont., L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 
R . W . Bro . Burton S . Freer 
R.R. NO. 6, Cambridge (Gait), Ont., N1R 5S7 



4-1 



LODGE OFFICERS - ELECT 



W . M . 


V.W.Bro. 


Jacob Pos 


J . S . V . W . Bro . 


I.P.M 


. R.W.Bro. 


N. Richard Richards 


Tyler R.W.Bro. 


S.W. 


R .W.Bro. 


Keith R .A. Flynn 


Sec'y W.Bro. 


J.W. 


R.W.Bro. 


Donald G.S. Grinton 


A. Sec. W.Bro. 


S.D. 


R.W.Bro. 


Ronald E. Groshaw 


Treas. R.W.Bro. 


J.D. 


Bro. 


George E. Zwicker 


D • . C . R . VJ . Bro . 


I.G. 


W . Bro . 


Balfour LeGresley 


Chap . Bro . 


o .o . 


W . Bro . 


Robert J. Welt 


Organist 



W . Robt . Carpentei 
uim.S. ivicVittie 
Jas.A. Faulkner 
J.J. Vliehs 
W.E. Wilson 
Roy S. Sparrow 
Rev. W.G. Rivers 



COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 



General Purpose , (S .W . ) , 

Visitation & Transportation (J .VJ.) , 

Membership & Unattached Masons, 

Refreshment & Entertainment, (S.S.), 

Masonic Information R . W . Bro , 

Central Data Bank R . W . Bro , 

Masonic Museum V .W .Bro, 

Lodge Library, R .W . Bro. 

Furnishings, Eqpt. & Regalia W.Bro, 

Lodge Seal & Banner, V.W.Bro, 

Lodge By-Laws R;W.Bro. 

Lodge Publications, R .W.Bro. 



R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn 
R . W . Bro . Donald Grinton 
R.W.Bro. Edmund Ralph 
W.Bro. Robt. J. Welt 

Gary J. Powell 

Ronald E. Groshaw 

Jacob (Jack) Pos 

Roy S. Sparrow 

Mai com G. Morin 

Stewart Thurtell 

Keith Flynn 

John B. Hunter 



NOTE: Help is urgently needed for the above Committees, please 

contact the appropriate Chairman directly, or volunteer your 
services through the Worshipful Master or Secretary. 



proceedings 

Ztyt heritage Hobge J?a730 



a.jf.&ajfl., &&.C. 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21 • 1977 

Jacob Pos 

W.M. 

10 Mayfield Ave. , 

Guelph, Ontario, 

NIG 2L8 

(519) 821-4995 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

J. A. Faulkner 

Sec'y 

22 Echo Drive, 

Guelph, Ontario, 

NIG 1H2 

(519) 824-2873 



Vol.02, No. 02 



Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



October, 1978 



This Bulletin includes the Summons for the next Regular 
Meeting, the Proceedings of the Fifth Regular Meeting held on 
Wednesday, September 20th, 1978, a Report of the Constitution and 
Consecration Ceremony held on Saturday, September 23rd, 1978, several 
announcements, and a proposed draft of the Lodge By-Laws. 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sir and Brother: 



I am directed by the Worshipful Master to request your 
attendance at a Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, to be 
held in the Preston-Hespeier Masonic Temple at the north-east corner 
of the intersection of Highways 401 and 24 on, 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, OCTOBER 18th, 1978, AT 7:30 p.m. 

prompt for the purpose of transacting such business as may be regularly 
brought before the Lodge, and the Election of Officers for 1978-79. 
A special feature on this occasion will be the presentation of a film 
titled "Precious Heritage", a production of Imagination Unlimited and 
directed by R.W.Bro. Allen E. Roberts. This film is an International 
Gold Award winning documentary on Freemasonry in the State of Ohio. 



Fraternally, 
J. A. Faulkner, 



Sec'y 



PROCEEDINGS 



The Fifth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, was 
held in the Preston-Hespeier Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, 
September 20, 1978, with 10 Officers, 28 Members and 9 Visitors 
present as per Lodge Register. 



- 2 - 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7s 35 p.m. The 
Worshipful Master was pleased to see a goodly number of Masons present 
particularly in view of the important and historical events that 
would be taking place in just three days. 

Written apologies were received from R.W.Bros. Wallace McLeod, 
Allan Broadley and C.E. Drew. R.W.Bro. Drew offered to serve as the 
Lodge Representative for Toronto District 4, and was looking forward 
to the Special Ceremonies that would be taking place on September 23rd. 

R.W.Bro. R.E. Groshaw phoned to send his regrets and his best 
wishes for a successful evening. 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn, seconded by 
Bro. George Zwicker, that the minutes of the Fourth Regular Meeting 
of the Lodge, held on May 17, 1978, be adopted as circulated. Carried. 

The Reports of the Committees on Petitions for Application 
for Affiliation, as recorded in the Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 02, No. 01, 
dated September, 1978, reported favourable to all Applicants. 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Tom Roberts f seconded by 
R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, that the Reports be received, the Committees 
discharged with the thanks of the Lodge, and the Applications balloted 
on. Carried. 

Thirteen items of correspondence were received since our last 
Regular Meeting in May, and are summarized as follows? 

1. From M.W.Bro. E.W. Nancekiveil* dated May 16, Hamilton, 
accepting our invitation to attend the Constitutional Dinner 
on Sept. 23rd, and to propose a toast to the Officers and 
Members of The Heritage Lodge. 

From R.W.Bro. N.C. Malloy, of Toronto District 7» dated May 
29th 5 an interesting letter giving a Brief History of Vaughan 
Lodge No. 5^» Maple s 0nt.,He also enclosed two coloured 
photographs of the present Lodge building which was built in 
1866 and still in excellent repair-. 

3. From Fred Neild, of Buenos Aires, Argentina, dated July 
20th, in which he sends copies of a 3i-Monthly 'digest* of ' 
condensed masonic articles. He would be happy to send sample 
copies free of charge to any who wish to write to him. The 
annual subscription, which includes 6 bi -monthly issues is 
$5.00 U.S. Funds, surface mail. 

4. From W. Rickert, Secretary, Preston-New Hope Masonic Holding 
Corporation, dated August 10th, advising that the rental rate 
for the year 1978-79. will be $270.00. 

5. From V.W.Bro. Donald J. Woodside, of St. Lawrence District, 
dated September 2nd, in which he informs us that because of 
the great distance he is unable to attend all of the meetings, 
but he was planning to be with us on the 23rd of September. He 
also offered his services as the Lodge Representative for 

St. Lawrence District. 

6. From M.W.Bro. Robert A. Hinshaw, Grand Secretary, the 
Grand Lodge of Free and Accepted Masons of Ohio, dated Sept. 
1st. This was in response to our enquiry as to the availability 
of their documentary film titled "Precious Heritage". It will 
be madeavailable to us for presentation at our Regular Meeting 



in October for a fee of $15-00. 

7. From M.W.Bro. J. A. Irvine, Grand Secretary, dated Sept. 8, 
advising us that we had, i in connection with our correspondence 
to the Grand Lodge of Ohio, gone beyond the bounds of masonic 
protocol in dealing directly with masonry beyond our juris- 
diction excepting through the Grand Secretary of our Grand 
Lodge . 

Six other letters were received from Members of The Heritage 
Lodge primarily to express their delight in having been in 
attendance at the last Regular Meeting to see the Brethren of 
Wellington District put on such a fine performance of a typical 
18th Century Lodge Meeting and the exemplification of the 
Ceremony of Initiation as practiced by our Ancient Brethren 
over 200 years ago. 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, seconded by 
V.W.Bro. Randall Langs, that the usual Warrants be issued 9 authorizing 
the Treasurer to pay the following accounts: Carried. 

Secretary's Accounts 

Postage, . $28.00 

Envelopes, 500 #3320, ...... 11.38 

Stationary, .... = 2.18, $41,56 

Kopy Print, Guelphs 

Sept. Summons, 

(350 copies @ 12 pages) ,..,.., 73-43 

Sterling Marking Products Inc., 

Lodge Seal , . . , 61.73 

Total $176.72 
The following applications for Affiliation were received froms 

1. B0RATYNEC, William T., W.M., 323 Runnymede Rd. , Toronto, 
Ontario; Age 67$ Retired; member of Prince of Wales Lodge No. 630, G.R. 
C. ; recommended by W.Bro. E.J.B. Anderson and M.W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey. 

2. BROOKS, William A., P.G.S.; P.O. Box 487, Hagersville, Ont., 
Age 56; member of Hiram Lodge No. 319, G.R.C.; recommended by V.W.Bro. 
Randall Langs and R.W.Bro. W.H. Wells. 

3. CLARK, Kenneth, P.Cf.S.j 543 Windemere Ave., Toronto, Ont.,; 
Age 74; Retired Teacher; member of Prince of Wales Lodge No. 630, G.R. 
C, ; recommended by W.Bro. E.J.B. Anderson and W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

4. CRINKLAW, Raymond, M.M. ; 21 Broadway Ave . , Lambeth, Ont.j 
Age 63; Restoration Contractor; member of St. Paul's Lodge No. 107, 
G.R.C.; recommended by Bro. Richard Deugate and Bro. D.H. Brough. 

5. GLASS, Stanley Albert Morris, M.M.; 191 Simcoe St., Prince 
Albert, Ont.i Age 43; Construction Technician; member of Fidelity 
Lodge No. 428, G.R.C.i recommended by R.W.Bro. J.H. Hitchinson and 
R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 

6. HERTEL, Leonard Richard, P.D.D.G.M.; 58 Keffer St., Cambridge 
(H) , Ont. 1 Age 65; Retired; member of Preston Lodge No. 297. G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Wm.S. McVittie and R.W.Bro. C.F. Grimwood. 



- 4 - 

7. HINES, Donald Gordon, M.M. ; 37 Thornton Rd. S., Oshawa, Ont. ; 
Age 48; Supervisor; member of Temple Lodge NO. 649, G.R.C.; recommended 
by R.W.Bro. W.G. Blinker and R.W.Bro. R.E. Groshaw. 

8. HORNER, Terry V., P.M.; 3311 Jolliffe Ave., Malton, Ont.; 
Age 38; President; member of the Beaches Lodge NO. 473, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. F.J. Bruce and V.W.Bro. J. Pos. 

9. LAMOND, Duncan Campbell, V.W.Bro.; 322 Metcalfe St. E. , 
Strathroy, Ont. ; Age 69; Real Estate Agent; member of Beaver Lodge NO. 
83, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. J. A. Faulkner and V.W.Bro. J. Pos. 

10. LAY, E. Warren, M.M.; 195 Aberdeen Rd., P.O. Box 91, 
Beamsville, Ont. ; Age 49; Technologist; member of Ivy Lodge NO. 115, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. R.J.L. Butler and R.W.Bro. C.A. Sankey. 

11. LEWIS, Ronald W., P.M.; 9 Dunelm Dr., St. Catharines, Ont.; 
Age 53; Sales Manager; member of St. George's Ledge NO. 15, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. George A. Campbell and Bro. Marvin B.R. Campbell. 

12. LEWIS, Robert W.T., W.M.j 4 Elmwood Ave., St. Catharines, 
Ont.f Age 27; Field Engineer; member of St. George's Lodge NO. 15, G. 
R.C.j recommended by W.Bro. G.A. Campbell and Bro. M.B.R, Campbell. 

13- LOWE, William A.H.PDDGMj 6151 Culp St., Niagara Falls, Ont.; 
Age 68; Retired; Secretary of Centennial Lodge No. 679, G.R.C.; 
recommended by V.W.Bro. J. Pos and R.W.Bro. N.R, Richards. 

14. Mac CALLUM, John A., M.M.; 12 Shamokin Dr., Don Mills, Ont.; 
Age 47; Distributor; member of Georgina Lodge NO. 343, G.R.C.; recomm- 
ended by R.W.Bro. C.E. Drew and R.W.Bro. David C. Bradley. 

15. MAY, Harry C. a P.G.S.; 1140 Woodbine Ave., Toronto, Ont,? 
Age 72; Retired; member of Acacia Lodge NO. 430 g G.R.C.& recommended by 
R.W.Bro. R.E. Groshaw and R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards, 

16. PERRYMAN, William Henry, P.M.; 666 Terrace Dr, Apt. 809, 
Oshawa, Ont. ; Age 52; Cable Repair, Bell Canada; member cf Lebanon 
Lodge NO. 139, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley and R. 
W.Bro, Ronald E. Groshaw. 

17 PIPER, Joel Charles, P.D.D.G.M.; Salford, Ontario j Age 36; 
Purchasing Agent; member of King Hiram Lodge NO, 37, G.R.C.; recomm- 
ended by V.W.Bro. S.L. Thurtell and W.Bro. R.J. Welt. 

18. ROBSON, James William, P.M.; R.R. #2, Dundas, Ont.; Age 66; 
Retired; member of Waterdown Lodge NO. 357, G.R.C.j recommended by 
W.Bro J.E. Brittain and R.W.Bro. G.I. Davies. 

19. SISEL, Eric, G. Chaplain; P.O. Box 2461, Huntsville, Ont.; 
Age 46; Clergyman; member of Unity Lodge NO. 376, G.R.C.; recommended 
byR. W.Bro, W.E. McLeod and W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, 

20. SPOONER, Leonard James, W.M. ; I78O Victoria Park Ave. Apt. 
808, Scarborough, Toronto, Ont.; Age S6\ Maintenance Supervisor; member 
of Wilson Lodge NO. 86, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. E.V. Ralph and 
W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

21. STAPLEY, Brian D. , M.M.; 5785 Yonge St. Apt, 327, Willowdale, 
Ont.; Age 3&i Purchasing Expediter; member of Richmond Lodge NO. 38, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. E.V. Ralph and Bro. Tom Roberts. 

22. TOMKINS, William Ross, M.M.; 480 Orchard Dr., Oakville, 
Ont.; Age 27; Retail Building Supply Dealer; member of Oakville Lodge 
NO. 400, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson and Bro. G.F. Moore 



It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn, seconded by 
Bro. George Zwicker, that the Applications be received and the usual 
Committees appointed. 

V.W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell, Chairman of the Committee on Lodge 
Seal and Banner, announced that the Lodge Seal had been purchased and 
is now in the possession of the Lodge Secretary. He requested that the 
members of his Committee meet with him immediately following the 
Regular Meeting, to discuss the format for dues cards, and the style of 
letterhead and other Lodge Stationary. 

W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, newly appointed Chairman of the 
Central Data Bank Committee, asked for assistance in obtaining inform- 
ation, pictures, slides, etc., of memorabilia of Lodges in our Grand 
Jurisdiction. 

V.W.Bro. Pos announced that The Heritage Lodge had representat- 
ion from 29 Masonic Districts and that he was still looking for volunt- 
eers to represent 8 of those namely? Greyi Hamilton A, B, and C; 
Muskoka- Parry Sound? Sarnia; London W. and Windsor. 

The following Brethren volunteered their services to assist 
with various duties during the Banquet and Ceremonies on September 23i 
R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards, W.Bro. Louis LaVine, W.Bro. Harvey Jones, W.Bro. 
C.L. Tugwell, Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers and Bro. John Jones. 

R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson, Treasurer, presented a complete Auditors' 
Report, covering the periods t March 1st, 1977 to August 31st, 1977; and 
September 1st, 1977 to August 3ist, 1978= This included the Financial 
Statement for the Operating Fund and the Capital Fund as well as the 
Profit and Loss Statements, 

It should be noted that our Operating Fund, for the full year 
for 1977-78, showed a loss in the amount of $717.03, Therefore we must 
bring our membership up appreciably, if we wish to operate the Lodge 
successfully on the income from the dues only. 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro, W.E. Wilson, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. R.S. Sparrow, that the report be accepted. Carried. 

V.W.Bro. Pos announced that the Third Regional Masonic Workshop 
is to be held on May 11th and 12th, 1979. The facilities at the Univer- 
sity of Guelph have been tentatively booked for that occasion. The 
Keynote speaker will be R.W.Bro. Allen E. Roberts of Highland Springs, 
Virginia, Past Deputy Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Virginia. 
Brother Roberts is a renowned Masonic Scholar, having published 12 
Masonic Books; produced k Motion Pictures, one, titled "Precious Heritage" 
received an International Gold Award; organized 5 Masonic Leadership 
Series Films; written 3 Masonic Plays and is the current Editor of a 
new and interesting publication titled The Altar Light, a Bi-Monthly 
Newsletter for Master Masons. 

At this time R.W.Bro. Keith R.A. Flynn, gave notice of motion, 
that he will move or cause to be moved, at the next Regular Meeting of 
The Heritage Lodge NO. 730: "that the proposed By-Laws be confirmed by 
the Brethren" (The proposed By-Laws are included in this Proceedings). 

A collective ballot was taken on all Applications for Affiliation 
as presented in the Lodge Proceedings for September, 1978, Vol. 02, NO. 
01. Following a favourable report on the ballot for all applicants, the 
Worshipful Master declared: R.W.Bros. W. Gordon Bunker, John M. Burnett, 



- 6 - 

Robert Robson, C. John Woodburn; V.W.Bros. John Storrie, Leonard Hubert 
Taylor; W.Bros. F. Harold Cowan, Harold B. Sills, Donald R. Thornton; 
and Bros. Lile Louis Burton, A Brian George, Clifford John Gravelle, 
James Noble Hayes, Richard Michael Lunney, and Francis James Melville 
Major, elegible for membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, G.R.C., 
by Affiliation upon payment of the proper fee and on signing the Lodge 
By-Laws in token of submission thereto. 

At this time, V.W.Bro. Pos called on R.W.Bro, Charles Grimwood 
to introduce R.W.Bro. Fred G. Daniells, P.D.D.G.M. of the former 
Wellington District and Chairman of Masonic Education for Waterloo 
District for the past three years. 

R.W.Bro. Daniells spoke on the subject "The Lost Art of Rhetoric' 
We did not receive a copy of Brother Daniells manuscript in time for 
this publication. However, it will be published in the next Proceedings. 



THE "NEAR -CRISES" IN THE TEMPLE 

by 
V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos 

Brethren, this is not a masonic paper in the traditional sense, 
but rather an answer to a question. The question was introduced by W.Brc, 
Lewis LaVine at our Third Regular Meeting on March 15th, 1978, when he 
expressed his concern over the financial crises relating to the Montreal 
Masonic Temple. 

We are grateful to our own Grand Master, M.W.Bro. Robert E. 
Davie s 9 for making a few inquiries on our behalf at the time of the 
108th Annual Communication of the Grand Lodge of Quebec this past June. 
The subject was discussed further with R.W.Bro. Gordon Parker. Grand 
Secretary of the Grand Lodge of Quebec, at the time of cur own Grand 
Lodge Communication this past July . But before we review the situation, 
let us take a brief look (1) at the stately ediface, 

The Temple (2) is situated in the heart of the city of Montreal 
and while its main entrance faces Sherbrook Street, the mailing address 
is 2295 St. Mark Street (3). The upper stories of the five storey grey 
ashlar structure is ornamented with recessed panels, leaving four expo- 
sed ionic columns. The blocked cornices are embelished with eleven lion 
heads carved of stone, while two sculptured circular portraits adorne 
each of the two solid end panels. According to the late R.W.Bro. A.J.B. 
Milborae, P.D.D.G.M., G.L.Q., the figures shown in the circular (k) 
carvings were meant to represent (5) the two Saints John. 

The porch or entrance is surmounted (6) by four, free standing 
fluted ionic pillars supporting the gabled dormer, en which is displayed 
a beautiful coat of arms in exquisite stone, guarded by two winged lions 
(7) at each side of the dormer. The ark of the covenant, at the top of 
the shield is watched over by two angels. 

At the base of the pillars (8), and set back slightly are the 
bronze flame torches, each supported by three sculptured figures. They 
(9) are five in number, each positioned above its representative word: 

Note - numbers in brackets refer to the visual slides in the presentation 



- 7 - 

FIDES - CARITAS - VERITAS - LIBERTAS - SPES , meaning 
fidelity - charity - truth - liberty - hope respectively. 

After ascending the three steps to the Sherbrook Street 
entrance, you pass between two smooth granit columns (10) each six 
cubits in height and ornamented with a bronze light globe or sphere 
supported by two winged horses carved in stone. 

The large entrance doors (11) are decorated with Zh panels, 
each inset with a bronze floral emblem (12) and bordered in a bronze 
frame. The fretwork above the doers (13) is wrought in bronze, and is 
meant to represent the rays of wisdom eminating from the rising sun. 

The Temple was constructed in 1929 as a memorial, sacred to 
the memory of those who gave their lives that other men might live in 
freedom and that tyranny and persecution might be subdued. It was first 
occupied in 1930, and it belongs to the entire Grand Jurisdiction of 
Quebec by virtue of funds responsibly provided by earlier masons to 
build it, and by later masons to maintain it. 

The Memorial Hall was dedicated in 1958 to the memory of those 
masons who made the supreme sacrifice at the time of the Second World 
War. Of particular interest to the visitors are the six beautiful, 
full scale murals (1*0 each protected by sturdy brass rails and 
tastefully illuminated with artificial lighting. 

This subject (15) was painted by C.W, Kelsey, and was chosen 
to remind the Craft that the first grand body in Quebec derived its 
authority from the original Grand Lodge of England formed in 171?, 
generally known as the "Moderns", 

In brilliant colours, we see John, Duke of Montagu, Grand 
Master of Masons of England in 1721, handing to his successor, Philip* 
Duke of Wharton, a roll of The Constitutions of the Ancient and 
Honourable Fraternity of Free and Accepted Masons. 

Behind each Grand Master stand his Officers, to the left? Dr. 
John Beal, Deputy Grand Master, Josias Villeneau and Thomas Morris, 
Wardens j and to the right: Dr. John Theophilus Desaguliers, Deputy 
Grand Master, Joshua Timson and William Hawkins, Wardens. 

The second (16) mural by Kelsey shows the Installation of 
Lieutenant John Price Guinnett as Provincial Grand Master of Quebec, 
November 28th, 1759. 

Kelsey' s third mural (17) shows the "Laying of the Foundation 
Stone" of the Wolfe and Montcalm Monument at Quebec in 1827. 

Another "Laying of the Corner-Stone" Ceremony (18) was painted 
by A. Sheriff -Scott. Here, the masons are gathered to lay the Corner- 
stone of the Richardson Wing of the Montreal General Hospital, Sept. 
15, 1831. 

Sheriff-Scott's second mural (19) takes us into the Grand 
Ravine at the 2,^00 foot elevation near the summit of Owl's Head 
mountain for a meeting of Golden Rule Lodge on June 24, 1858 when Mr. 
Alexander Murray was Initiated into the mysteries and priviledges of 
Masonry. Guards were stationed on the adjoining watch towers. 



- 8 - 

The last mural, also by Sheriff-Scott which we shall see in 
a moment, is of particular interest to the history of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730, because it was this document (20), issued to Sir John 
Johnson, May 17, 1788, authorizing him, under the authority of the 
first Grand Lodge "Moderns" of England, to make masons and constitute 
lodges in Upper and Lower Canada. The original document has been 
suitably framed and is now displayed in the Office of The Grand Master 
in the Memorial Building in Hamilton. It was this project that was 
primarily responsible for bringing about the formation of The Heritage 
Lodge. 

This is the original collar and jewel (21)worn by Sir John's 
father Sir William Johnson as the first Worshipful Master of St. 
Patricks Lodge NO. 4, Provincial Grand Lodge of New York, it is cast 
in solid silver and was taken by Sir John Johnson when he fled from 
Johnstown, New York to Montreal at the time of the American Revolution 
in 1775. It remained in his possession until his death in I830 when- 
according to the directions of his will, it was returned to St. Patricks 
Lodge NO. 4 (22) in Johnstown and joined with the matching collar and 
jewel of the Senior and Junior- Wardens. They are worn regularly to this 
very day by the three Principal Officers of the Lodge. 

The mural (23) depicts the funeral of Sir John Johnson, January 
8th, I830, as the casket was being carried from the gun carriage to 
the waiting boat to be taken across the St. Lawrence River to be 
intered in the burial mound at the summit of Mount Johnson near 
Sherbrook, Quebec, The records indicate that there were over ^00 
Indians in the funeral procession. 

But what of the crises in the Temple (24-)? ?he alarming word is 
TAXES, Under the Provincial Real Estate Assessment Act of 1973, the 
City of Montreal withdrew an exemption from Municipal Property Tax, 
that had been accorded since 1930* The following comparative figures 
illustrate the disastrous effect of the 197^ legislation: 

In 1972 taxes were $23,600 
In 1976 taxes were 81,100 
In 1977 budgeted for taxes, 95tOOO 
In 1978 taxes were 110,000 

Taxes have been paid, under protest, by assistance of loans 
from the Grand Lodge of Quebec. 

Prompt action was taken to prepare and introduce a claim for 
tax exemption on the grounds that the Masonic Foundation of Quebec, 
because of its nature and activities, should clearly qualify for such 
exemption. The case was duly and competently presented before the 
Quebec Board of Revisions. On receipt of a negative ruling from the 
Board of Revisions, an appeal before the Quebec Superior Court was 
instituted. The supporting brief was prepared with great care. 

In light of the current economy, it appears that no relief 
from taxes can be expected regardless of the legalities of the case. 
The current total figure for indebtedness to the Grand Lodge for loans 
occuring prior to 1975-76 and the advances made for 1975-7o, approx- 
imates $750,000, plus accrued interest unpaid for many years although 
payable at the priviledged low rate of 2 percent. 

The bulk of the assets of Grand Lodge consist of the mortgage 
and indebtedness. The generosity of Grand Lodge to the Foundation is 



- 9 - 

apparent, but it is also clear that no further drain from the meager 
possessions of the Grand Lodge of Quebec will be permitted. 

In view of the age of the Temple, inflation in all costs, and 
the drastic increase in cost of fuel oil, the annual injection of funds 
required for proper maintenance now runs between $50,000 and $75 » 000. 
The important aspect of structural preservation has not been neglected 
as the need was recognized in 1973. when the Headquarters Development 
Fund Appeal was launched; the resulting infusion of $86,000 for needed 
repairs and improvements has kept the building in good condition. 

Nevertheless, there is a shortfall of some $60,000 annually, 
in income from Temple operations, to meet expenses. This means that if 
the taxes cannot be paid, the Temple will be forfeited and with it 
Grand Lodge's equity of nearly three quarters of a million dollars. 

Recent events in the Province of Quebec have had a disastrous 
effect on Real Estate values. The market value of the Temple, being a 
special purpose building and restricted in changes or alterations by 
the Minister of Cultural Affairs, has been seriously affected. Also 
the large exodus of major companies and the head offices of many others 
has imposed a serious drain on the membership of masonic lodges. This 
has been most noticeable among the officers . 

The situation became so desperate that, by correspondence 
dated October 3, 1977t the Grand Master, M.W.Bro. W.R. Carmichael, 
made a personal appeal to each member of his Grand Jurisdiction. The 
opening paragraph of his "SAVE THE TEMPLE" campaign read as follows i 

"Dear Brother! 

Your help is urgently required to save the Montreal 
Masonic Memorial Temple . With all the sincerity I can 
command I must request that you and all Masons under the 
jurisdiction of the Grand Lodge of Quebec immediately 
forward a cheque for $100 or more to the ,: Save The Temple 
Trust Fund", as a non-interest bearing loan." 

It was hoped in this way to endow the Temple with a $1.5 
million dollar fund, the income of which would provide the additional 
funds to meet expenses on an ongoing basis. 

By April 19th, 1978, only $250,000 had been received, and as 
of this date an additional $50,000 has been added which, nearly one 
year later, is still 80 percent short of their objective. 

Is this a hopeless situation? Think about it Brethren, we may 
be facing similar circumstances, not only at 888 Yonge Street in 
Toronto, but at many beautiful Masonic Temples throughout the entire 
jurisdiction, where single purpose use prevails and there is no 
opportunity for additional income to assist in defraying the operating 
cost of the building. 

From the foregoing you may per ci eve that the future forebodes 
nothing but gloom and despair for our Masonic Brethren in Quebec, but 
Freemasonry has always survived and while the financial situation is 
still desperate, there does appear to be a ray of hope in a more 
meaningful and enduring manner. But first let me digress for a brief 
moment and take you back to the year i960. 



- 10 - 

An Associated Press dispatch, with a Washington D.C. dateline 
of October 25. I960, confirmed reports that some men were urging the 
defeat of Senator Kennedy for President because of his Catholic faith. 
I need not remind this audience how contradictory that would be to the 
basic principles of Freemasonry, nor the anxiety it must have imposed 
in the hearts of true brother masons everywhere. 

Indeed, a former Michigan Supreme Court Justice, George E. 
Bushnell, Grand Commander for the 15-State Northern Jurisdiction of 
the Scottish Rite, stated in an interview: "I entirely repudiate such 

campaigning. It is un-American The greatest liberty people have 

is the right to express themselves at the polls, uninfluenced by 
anything except the persuasion of those seeking their votes and their 
own conscience." 

"As for Catholicism If men of the Catholic faith are 

willing to die for our flag, certainly their faith should be no barrier 
to their serving as commander-in-chief of our forces as President". 

What has this to do with a ray of hope? How many of you have 
read Father O'Brien's booklet "Catholics and Masons Now Good Friends, 
1969"? 

The strong statement of George Bushnell, provoked the 
admiration of Father John A. O'Brien, Research Professor of Theology 
at the University of Notre Dame, who wrote a short note of commendation 
and gratitude. This was the beginning of a friendship and a joint 
crusade, which is not within the time frame of this presentation to 
relate, other than to say, during the next seven years the bonds of 
brotherhood grew beyond their sphere to include such prominent catholics 
as Cardinal Cushing, Bishop Robert F, Joyce of Vermont, Bishop Leo A t 
Pursley in Indiana, Archbishop John P. Cody in Chicago f John J. 
McCullough, State Deputy of the Knights of Columbus in Massachusetts, 
were meeting together with such masons as Dwighx L. Smith of Indiana, 
Albert N. Kepler, long an active member of the Supreme Council, and 
Irving E. Partridge of Connecticut. Yes Catholics and Masons were 
becoming good friends. 

Later, in the Province of Quebec, dialogue with the Roman 
Catholic Church was underway. During 1976, five such meetings produced 
a document for presentation to the Secretary of the Assembly of 
Bishops of Quebec. In brief, the document stated that: ".. regular 
Freemasonry, in which ranks the Grand Lodge of Quebec, presents itself 
to us as a non- confessional association which applies itself to 
developing civic and moral personality, limiting itself however to the 
human level. But it does not intend to go so far as to deny a superior 

plan. What is more, and it is our second conclusion, 

regular Freemasonry offers nothing in its Constitutions which can 
legitimately permit believing or saying that it plots against the 
Catholic Church. Consequently, it does not fall under the condemnation 
of canon 2335 of the Code of Canon Law. 

Brethren, in spite of the current exodus, it should be apparent 
that the total membership will level off after which time we shall 
witness a steady growth of even greater proportions as more and more 
Catholics continue to become more active in the Fraternity. However, 
there is one important consideration that must not be overlooked. 

The Craft membership to date is predominately English speaking. 
In 1975 1 the Francophone Club for the study of Masonry had been 



- 11 - 

organized by four Franchophone Lodges in Quebec and was operating with an 
enthusiastic membership, basically French-speaking, but open to all Masons. 

Two years later, we read in our Fraternal Review for 1977. "the 
club is continuing its efforts to provide programmes of Masonic education 
for those who are endeavouring to further their Masonic knowledge". Then 
again this year we read, with reference to the Francophone Lodges, "The 
new situation flows from a combination of decreasing English-speaking 
population in all but the major centres, and the pleasant necessity of 
recognizing increased Masonic interest among French-speaking Canadians, 
combined with a reduction of the old religious antagonisms. Translations 
of the ritual into French are essential and are being prepared". 

Perhaps you are already anticipating the main purpose of this 
message; but first let us praise the foresight of the members of the 
Francophone Club in recognizing the real needs of French-speaking Masons 
in Quebec. One might well ask, why is it taking so long to prepare suit- 
able, translations, particularly when a number of Lodges have been working 
in French for a number of years? To date, translations have been made for 
the first two degrees and the third degree is currently being translated, 
but nothing has been done with regards other material, eg. Constitutions. 

It would appear that the financial crises over stone and cement 
is overshadowing the more important truths of fraternal relations between 
French-speaking and English-speaking Masons. With the more liberal views 
being acknowledged from Rome on the one hand, and the difficulties 
imposed by Bill 101 on the other hand, it would seem desirable at this 
time to encourage and welcome, with a true spirit of brotherhood, French- 
speaking Catholics into the world body of Masons. Many are interested, 
and some have already become involved. The best way to exhibit our faith 
and trust would be to provide, without delay, official French translat- 
ions for all the Degrees, the Constitution and a typical set of Lodge 
By-Laws. Perhaps some financial assistance to the Francophone Club, 
through the Grand Lodge of Quebec, to assist in this work might be of 
immeasurable value to Freemasonry in the Province of Quebec, as they 
appear to be approaching a time of challenging new developments. 

Following a few announcements, the Lodge was closed in harmony 
at 10:35 p.m. 

# » * 

CONSTITUTION AND CONSECRATION CEREMONY 

September 23, 1978, marked a most significant and historic date 
in the development of The Heritage Lodge. A Joint Constitutional Dinner 
was held with the Officers, Members and Friends of The Otto Klotz Lodge 
No. 731 t at the Matador Tavern, 250 Hespeler Rd. , Cambridge -Gait. The 
total attendance was 1^2, with 51 distinguished guests at the Head Tables. 

The toast to the Grand Master and the Grand Lodge was given in 
a most capable manner by Bro. Donald Gorman, and responded to by M.W. 
Bro. Robert E. Davies, who expressed his delight in being with us to 
share our joys on this important occasion. The Grand Master gave an 
inspiring address, and concluded his remarks by outlining some of the 
coming events, including the preparations for our 125th Anniversary. 

M.W. Bro. Eric W. Nancekivell in proposing the toast to the 
Officers and Members of The Heritage Lodge, paid tribute to those who 
conceived the concept for this unique Lodge and expressed his confidence 
that its impact would have far reaching effects, not only for its 
growing membership, but for the good of Freemasonry in general. 



- 12 - 

In responding to the toast, R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards thanked 
Brother Nancekivell on behalf of the Lodge, and reminded the Brethren 
that our work had only just begun and we must now demonstrate to the 
Craft in general that we have the capability to live up to our 
expectations. 

Following the banquet, the Brethren proceeded to the Temple to 
join with other Masons for the Official Ceremonies of the evening. The 
Lodge Register showed a total of 1^0 Masons in attendance. 

The Lodge was opened in the 1st Degree at 8:^5 p.m. V.W.Bro. 
Pos expressed his pleasure at such a large attendance, and hoped that 
all would find the evening one of profit and pleasure, Ke then called 
on R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce and V.W.Bro. Randall Langs as the Deputation 
to announce to the M.W. the Grand Master that the Officers and Members 
of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, were assembled and desireous of being 
constituted and consecrated. On the return of the Deputation from the 
Grand Lodge, the Lodge was opened in the 2nd Degree at 8:55 p.m. 

The M.W. the Grand Master, M.W.Bro. Robert E. Davies entered 
the Lodge leading a most distinguished procession of the Grand Lodge, 
The Lodge was subsequently Constituted? in accordance with ancient 
usage, to act as a Regular Lodge within the Jurisdiction of the Grand 
Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario. 

The Grand Master, with the assistance of the Grand Chaplain 
and the Grand Lodge, then proceeded to Consecrate the lodge in 

conformity with the usages and customs of the Craft. The proclamations 
having been completed, the M.W. the Grand Master and Members of the 
Grand Lodge retired at 10 j0? p.m. 

At this time, V.W.Bro. Pos called on M.W.3ro. William K, 
Bailey, the Installing Master, to assume the gavel and proceed with 
the Installation and Investiture of the first officers of the newly 
Constituted and Consecrated Lodge. M.W.Bro. Bailey then called on the 
members of the Installing Board to assume their respective places, and 
then proceeded with an impressive arid dignified ceremony which was 
conducted with great efficiency and dispatch. The following Officers 
were Installed and Invested accordingly: 



W.M. V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos 

I . P . M . R . W . Bro . N . Ri chard Ri chards 

S.W. R.W.Bro, Keith R.A. Flynn 

J.W. R.W.Bro. Donald G.S. Grinton 

S.D. R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 

J.D. Bro. George Zwicker 

I.G. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley 

S.S. (proxy) W.Bro. Robert J. Welt 



J.S. V.W.Bro, W.Robt. Carpenter 

Tyler R.W.Bro. Wm. S. McVittie 

Sec'y (proxy) W.Bro. J. A. Faulkner 

A. Sec. W.Bro. J.J. Vliehs 

Treas. R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson 

D.C. R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 

Chap. Bro. Rev. W.G. Rivers 



R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson, on behalf of the Lodge, thanked M.W.Bro. 
Bailey and the many Brethren who had assisted him for the excellent 
manner in which they had performed their alloted tasks. He also paid 
tribute to V.W.Bro. Pos for all his efforts in bringing about the 
formation of The Heritage Lodge No. 730. 



'he Lodge was closed in harmony at 11:30 p.m. 



$roposieb Hobgt iJip-latos 

THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 730 
A.F. & A . M . , G.R.C. 



A Brief History 

The first notion for the development of a Historical 
Lodge was conceived in the hearts and minds of a number 
of concerned Masons who had become particularly disturbed 
over the increasing erosion of our masonic heritage and 
the apathy towards its preservation. Each year unknown 
quantities of masonic books, papers, documents and other 
memorabilia are innocently disposed of by widows and 
families of departed Brethren simply because there is 
no place or procedure to receive and sort out that which 
should be catalogued, preserved or displayed. 

This important subject became a topic of much dis- 
cussion at the Regional Masonic 'Workshops held in Brant- 
ford and Hanover in 19?6. The interest generated during 
and following the meetings provided the incentive to 
proceed with the initial planning for the formation of 
a unique body of masons for the express purpose of sal- 
vaging and preserving our masonic heritage. 

The first few meetings were held in private homes, 
but these soon expanded into well attended organizational 
meetings held in Masonic Temples in Guelph, Waterloo, 
Georgetown and Cambridge as well as a special meeting 
at the University of Guelph. On several occasions, 
prominent speakers were invited to discuss the merits of 
our proposed objectives. After analysing the advantages 
as well as the causes for the failure of other masonic 
groups and research associations in the past, it soon 
became apparent that the basic structure of the craft 
lodge, which has survived for over 200 years, was needed 
to provide the framework for continuity and to ensure 
the future of the proposed lodge. 

All agreed that such a lodge would provide an 
intellectual environment for the pursuit of Masonic 
knowledge, and a means for receiving and recording 
historical artifacts to ensure the preservation of our 
Masonic Heritage without encroachment on the normal 
functions of Constituent Lodges whose province it is to 
initiate candidates, confer degrees and provide light 
and instruction for the Brethren in Masonry. 

The lodge would accept, by affiliation in the usual 
manner, all masons of like mind who are desirous of 
working together tc fulfil the aims and objectives est- 
ablished by the membership; and by the unique character 
of its purpose, it would complement the work of the 



Craft Lodges by directing its principal efforts to the 
following objectives: 



1. To preserve, maintain and uphold those 
Historical Events that formed the foundation 
of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masonry. 

2. To promote the study of Masonry in general 
and provide a service by responding to 
requests for masonic information. 

3. To produce Lodge Proceedings, Research 
Papers, and Historical Reviews; and to 
arrange special Lectures and visual 
presentations. 

k. To organize and maintain a "Central 

Inventory" of items of Historical interest 
in the possession of Lodges. 

5. To encourage participation by Regular 
Lodges and their Members, in the activities 
of this Lodge. 

6. To endeavour to establish a "Masonic Museum". 

7. To encourage Masonic Scholars and Lodge 
Historians to become more interested in 
the history of their own Lodge and its 
artifacts. 

The Petition for a Warrant of Constitution, to the 
Grand Master of the Most Honourable Fraternity of Ancient 
Free and Accepted Masons of Canada in the Province of 
Ontario, was signed by 10k dedicated Charter Members. 
Their prayers having been answered, the Lodge came into 
being by special Dispensation, dated September 9, 1977, 
under the authority of the Grand Master, Most Worshipful 
Brother Robert Edwin Davies. The Institution Ceremony 
took place on September 21, 1977, under the direction 
of R.V.'.Bro. Charles F. Grimwood, District Deputy Grand 
Master for Waterloo District 

By the time of the Fourth Regular Meeting of the Lodge 
in May, 1978, an additional 65 Masons had applied for 
membership, bringing the total to 169, representing 98 
Lodges from 27 Districts. These Brethren now stand on the 
threshold of exciting new concepts in masonic outreach 
as they endeavour to carry out the duties they have 
obligated themselves to perform. 

May the Great Architect of the Universe prosper 
their united endeavours. 



- iii- 

THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 730 
A.F. & A.M. , G.R.C. 

CHARTER MEMBERS 



Bro. Abdul Alarakhia 
M.W.Bro. James N. Allan 
W.Bro. Leslie G. Allan 
W.Bro. Ernest J.B. Anderson 
M.W.Bro. William K. Bailey 
Bro. Albert A. Barker 
Bro. Kenneth G. Bartlett 
Bro. Walter H. Benallick 
W.Bro. George Blackie 
Bro. Harry R. Bolton 
R. W.Bro. Fred W. Bowery 

W.Bro. Clyde Bowman 
R. W.Bro. David C. Bradley 
R. W.Bro. Fred R. Branscombe 
Bro. Gordon R. Brittain 
Bro. John E. Brittain 
W.Bro. Ernest G. Brit ton 
R. W.Bro. Allan E. Broadley 

Bro. Claude Brodeur 
R. W.Bro. Sidney A. Browell 
W.Bro. Ernest J. Brown 
W.Bro, Chesley R. Burton 
W.Bro. David J. Butcher 
W.Bro. Robert J.L. Butler 
W.Btg* George A. Campbell 
Bro. Marvin B.R. Campbell 
V. W.Bro. Robert W, Carpenter 
W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe 

Bro. Ronald G. Cooper 
W.Bro. Peter Corbin 
R. W.Bro. G. Ivor Davies 
V . W . Bro . C . Laverne Dawdy 
W.Bro. Richard H.W. Deacon 
W.Bro. James DeZeeuw 
R. W.Bro. Charles E. Drew 
W.Bro. Paul R. Engel 
W.Bro. James A. Faulkner 
Bro. James A. Faulkner 
* W.Bro. Oliver T. Flint 
R. W.Bro. Keith R.A. Flynn 
W.Bro. G. Alexander Forbes 
Bro. Gary J.T. Forsyth 
*R. W.Bro. Charles Fotheringham 
W.Bro. George B. German 
R. W.Bro. James W. Gerrard 
Bro. Donald H. Gorman 
R . W . Bro . Arch Davi d Grant 

W.Bro. H. Stewart Greavette 
R. W.Bro. Donald G.S. Grinton 
R. W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 
R. W.Bro. Donald R. Hall 

W.Bro. Stanley T. Halliwell 



R. W.Bro. 

R. W.Bro. 

W . Bro . 

R. W.Bro. 

R. W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

Bro. 

W . Bro . 

V. W.Bro. 

V. W.Bro. 

V. W.Bro. 

W . Bro . 

V. W.Bro. 

W . Bro . 

Bro. 

Bro. 

R. W.Bro. 

V. W.Bro. 

R . W . Bro . 

W . Bro . 

• W.Bro. 

Bro. 

R . W . Bro . 

W.Bro. 

R. W.Bro. 

V. W.Bro. 

R. W.Bro. 

R . W . Bro , 

Bro. 

Bro 

W . Bro . 

R. W.Bro. 

W . Bro . 

W.Bro. 

W . Bro . 

Bro. 

R. W.Bro. 

Bro. 

R. W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

Bro. 

V. W.Bro. 

V. W.Bro. 

W . Bro . 

R. W.Bro. 

W.Bro. 

Bro. 

V. W.Bro. 

R. W.Bro. 

R . W . Bro . 

Bro. 



George H.C. Hardy 
Roston E. Hargreaves 
Alan D. Hogg 
John B. Hunter 
James H. Hutchinson 
Harvey E. Jones 
John Wm. Jones 
Donald B. Kaufman 
Randall D. Langs 
W. Robert Lawson 
Albert L. Lee 
C.E. Balfour LeGresley 
James E. Lumley 
Stanley W. Lyons 
Roderick S, Macintosh 
J. Craig Masecar 
Wallace E. McLeo'd 
Robert S. McMaster 
William S. McVittie 
Bertie A. Mennie 
Mai com G. Morin 
David Nicholls 
Irwin G. Noble 
Leroy K Norton 
Clare A. Parsons 
Jacob Pos 
Gary J. Powell 
N. Richard Richards 
Rev. W. Gray Rivers 
Gregory C. Robinson 
Horace H.C. Rose 
Charles A. Sankey 
Oliver W.D. Sayer 
Jack Shipp 
Lee D. Simington 
Alan I Smith 
Roy S. Sparrow 
Herbert F. Steele 
Edsel C. Steen 
Norman E. Taylor 
Peter, E. Taylor 
Stewart L. Thurtell 
Ralph G. Tucker 
Joseph J Vliehs 
William H. Wells 
Robert J. Welt 
William E. Westbrook 



Joseph H.A 
Terrence R, 
W. Edwin C 
Richard M. 



White 
Williams 
Wilson 
Zimmerman 



Bro. George E. Zwicker 



Deceased 



TABLE OF CONTENTS 



Page 



A Brief History, i 

Charter Members , iii 

Table of Contents , iv 

Preamble , 1 

Article I, 1. Name, 1 

Article II, 1. Relation to Grand Lodge 1 

Article III, 1. Purpose and Objectives, 1 

Article IV, 1. Regular Meetings 2 

2. Emergent Meetings, 2 

3. Installation and Investituture, 2 

Article V, 1. Officers 2 

Article VI, 1. Duties of Officers 3 

2. Worshipful Master, 3 

3. Immediate Past Master, 3 

h. Senior Warden, 3 

5. Junior Warden, 3 

6 . Chaplain , 3 

7. Treasurer, 3 

8. Secretary, k 

9. Assistant Secretary, 5 

10. Deacons 5 

11. Director of Ceremonies, 5 

1 2 . Stewards 5 

1 3 • Inner Guard , 5 

14. Tyler 5 

1 5 • Organi st , 6 

16. Historian, 6 

17. Auditors, 6 

18. Scrutineers, 6 

Article VII , 1 . Committees, 6 

2. Appointment of Committees, 6 

3. Committee of General Purposes, . 7 
Article VIII, Duties of Committees, ? 

1. General Purposes, 7 

2. Visitation and Transportation, . 7 

3. Membership & Unattached Masons, 8 
k. Refreshment & Entertainment, ... 8 

5. Masonic Information, 8 

6. Central Data Bank 8 

7- Masonic Museum, 8 

8 . Lodge Library, 9 

9. Lodge Publications, 9 

10. Reception, 9 

11. Reports 9 

Article IX, Membership, 10 

1. Admission to Membership 10 

2. Honorary Membership, 10 

3. Resignation of Members, 10 

Article X, Rules of Order, 11 



Table of Contents Cont'd 



Article 


XI, 




Article 


XII, 


1. 

2. 










3. 


Article 


XIII, 




Article 


XIV, 




Article 


xv, 




Article 


XVI, 


1. 

2. 
3- 


Article 


XVII, 




Article 


XVIII 




Article 


XIX, 




Article 


XX, 





Vote on the Ballot, 11 

Fees and Dues, 12 

Initiation, 12 

Affiliation, 12 

Annual Dues, 12 

Arrears of Fees and Dues, 12 

Restoration, 12 

Financial Year, 12 

Lodge Funds , 13 

Operating Funds, 13 

Capital Fund, 13 

Visitors, 14 

Contingencies, 14 

Alterations to the By-Laws, 14 

Signing of By-Laws, 14 



BY - LAWS 

of 

THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 730 
G.R.C., A.F. & A.M. 

Instituted 5977 

In the Province of Ontario 

PREAMBLE 

Order and regularity being essentially necessary for the 
preservation of that harmony and decorum which should at all times 
characterize Freemasons, the Brethren of The Heritage Lodge of 
Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons, No. 730, on the Register of the 
Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario, do agree to and 
hereby enact the following By-Laws: 

ARTICLE I - NAME 

1. This Lodge shall be known as "The Heritage Lodge", A.F. & A.M., 
No. 730, G.R.C. 

ARTICLE II - RELATION TO GRAND LODGE 

1. This Lodge fully acknowledges the supremacy of the Grand Lodge 
of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons of Canada, in the Province of 
Ontario, and will at all times pay due respect and obedience to its 
laws, rules, orders and regulations. 

ARTICLE III - PURPOSE AND OBJECTIVES 

1. To preserve, maintain and uphold those Historical Events that 
formed the foundation of Ancient, Free and Accepted Masonry. 

2. To promote the study of Masonry in general and provide a service 
by responding to requests for masonic information. 

3. To produce Lodge Proceedings, Research Papers, and Historical 
Reviews; and to arrange special lectures and visual presentations. 

k. To organize and maintain a "Central Inventory" of items of 
Historical interest in the possession of Lodges. 



2 - 



5. To encourage participation by Regular Lodges and their Members, 
in the activities of this Lodge. 

6. To endeavour to establish a "Masonic Museum". 

7. To encourage Masonic Scholars and Lodge Historians to become 
more interested in the history of their own Lodge and its artifacts. 

ARTICLE IV - MEETINGS 
REGULAR MEETINGS 

1 . Regular Meetings of the Lodge shall be held the third Wednesday 
of the months of September, November, March and May, at 1 \ 30 p.m. 
in the Freston-Hespeler Temple, Cambridge. 

EMERGENT MEETINGS 

2. Emergent Meetings may be held as provided for in the Book of 
Constitution, at the discretion of the Worshipful Master. 

INSTALLATION AND INVESTITURE 

3. The Worshipful Master shall be Installed and the other Officers 
Invested annually at the Regular Meeting in November. 

ARTICLE V - OFFICERS 

1. The Officers of the Lodge shall be: Worshipful Master, Senior 
Warden, Junior Warden, Secretary, Treasurer, Chaplain, Senior Deacon, 
Junior Deacon, Inner Guard, Senior Steward, Junior Steward, Organist, 
Director of Ceremonies, Assistant Secretary and Tyler. 

2. The following Officers shall be elected annually at the Regular 
Meeting in September by written ballot: Worshipful Master, Senior 
Warden, Junior Warden, Secretary, and Treasurer. 

3. The following shall be elected annually at the Regular Meeting 
in September by open vote: Tyler, two Auditors, and an Examining 
Board composed of three Installed Masters. 

4. The Worshipful Master, on the occasion' of the Election of Officers, 
shall appoint two Brethren as Scrutineers of the ballot. 

5. The following shall be appointed by the Worshipful Master after 
consultation with his Elected Officers and the Past Masters of The 
Heritage Lodge: Senior Deacon, Junior Deacon, Inner Guard, Senior 
Steward, Junior Steward, Chaplain, Organist, Historian, Director of 
Ceremonies, and Assistant Secretary. 



- 3 - 



ARTICLE VI - DUTIES OF OFFICERS 

1. Every Brother elected or appointed to office, pledges himself 
by his acceptance of that office to a strict and punctual 
performance of the duties thereof. 

WORSHIPFUL MASTER 

2. The Worshipful Master, in addition to conforming to the ancient 
charges and regulations and performing the duties laid down in the 
Book of Constitution, shall be responsible for the safe keeping of 
the Warrant and other Lodge Records, Books and Papers. He shall 
sign all orders on the Treasurer and be (ex-officio) a member of 
all Committees. 

IMMEDIATE PAST MASTER 

3. The duties of the immediate Past Master, are those designated 
to him by the Worshipful Master and the Ritual, and are not fixed 
by any By-Laws. 

SENIOR WARDEN 

*K The Senior Warden, in addition to performing the regular duties 
appertaining to his office shall, under direction of the Worshipful 
Master 5 see to the proper keeping of the jewels, furniture and 
other property of the Lodge, and cause them to be properly insured. 
He shall, immediately after his investure. examine the inventory of 
the same and report his findings to the Lodge for entry in the 
Minute Book. He shall, subject to the approval of the Worshipful 
Master, be Chairman of the Committee of General Purposes. 

JUNIOR WARDEN 

5. The Junior Warden, besides attending to the regular duties of 
his office shall, with the assistance of the Deacons and under the 
authority of the Worshipful Master, make all necessary arrangements 
for transportation for lodge visitations. 

CHAPLAIN 

6. The Chaplain shall attend regularly and punctually all meetings 
of the Lodge, deliver invocations and perform such other duties 
appropriate to his office. 

TREASURER 

7. The Treasurer shall receive all monies of the Lodge and shall 
promptly deposit same in a Chartered Bank or Trust Company approved 
by the Lodge to the account of "The Heritage Lodge NO. 730",G.R.C, 
A.F. & A.M. He shall from time to time advise the Secretary of the 
amounts deposited. 



- 4 - 

Treasurer cont'd - 

He shall keep proper books in which all receipts, disbursements, 
invested funds, lodge inventory and other lodge assets shall be duly 
entered. He shall pay all authorized accounts promptly f keeping a 
regular account of same. Money may only be drawn out by cheque on 
order drawn by the Worshipful Master and Secretary jointly. 

The Lodge books, records and vouchers shall be available for 
inspection by the Officers of the Lodge or the Auditors at any time. 
His accounts, records and vouchers shall be submitted annually to 
the Auditors after the fiscal year ending August 31 , and not later 
than one full week previous to the day of the Annual Installation 
and Investiture. He shall transfer to his successor immediately 
after his Investment all monies, together with all other property 
of the Lodge in his possession. 

SECRETARY 

8. The Secretary shall keep a prompt and faithful record of the 
proceedings of the Lodge in prescribed form, and preserve in proper 
order all books , documents and papers related thereto. He shall 
maintain a correct and current register of the members and their 
respective accounts with the Lodge. He shall also keep an account 
showing fees and dues received from and payable to the Grand Lodge. 
He shall receive ail monies paid to the Lodge by the members and 
by other sources r issue a receipt and promptly transfer same to the 
Treasurer. He shall certify all accounts passed by the Lodge and 
prepare warrants for payment of same by the Treasurer. 

He shall notify all members of the meetings in accordance with 
the Rules of Grand Lodge as recorded in the Book of Constitution, 
and advise them of the time at which they must be present at all 
meetings, He must countersign all orders and charges of the Worshipful 
Master, prepare, deliver to him and retain copies of all returns 
required by tne Grand Lodge and notify the members of each committee 
of their appointment and the nature of their duties. 

He shall annually, at the end of the fiscal year and no later 
than one full week previous to the day of the Annual Installation 
and Investiture, submit his books and records to the Auditors for 
examination and shall transfer the same to his successor immediately 
after his Investiture , unless the Lodge may otherwise direct; and 
on the night of Installation and Investiture he shall produce the 
Auditor's Report in accordance with the Book of Constitution. He 
shall have charge of the Seal of the Lodge, sign all authorized 
certificates and generally, under the direction of the Worshipful 
Master, perform such duties appertaining to the office of Secretary 
as may be conducive to the best interest of the Lodge. He shall be 
exempt from payment of all lodge dues during his term of office, 
and shall be paid such honorarium as the Lodge may by resolution 
from time to time direct. 



- 5 - 

ASSISTANT SECRETARY 

9. The Assistant Secretary shall carry out such duties as are 
delegated to him by the Secretary, and in the Secretary's absence 
or incapacity act on his behalf. He shall perform such other duties 
commensorate with the office of Assistant Secretary as may be assigned 
to him by the Worshipful Master. He shall also, subject to the 
approval of the Worshipful Master and Senior Warden, act as Secretary 
of the "General Purpose" Committee, He shall be exempt from payment 

of all lodge dues during his term of office. 

DEACONS 

10. The Deacons shall attend the Master and Wardens in opening the 
Lodge and in the ceremonies and introduction of distinguished guests, 
visitors, and otherwise as the Worshipful Master and Wardens may 
direct, They shall also assist the Junior Warden in arranging 
transportation for lodge visitations. 

DIRECTOR OF CEREMONIES 

11. The Director of Ceremonies shall receive and introduce all 
visiting brethren. He shall, with the assistance of the Stewards, 
see that the Lodge Room is properly prepared. He shall act, under 

the direction of the Worshipful Master, as marshal for all processions 
and public occasions. He shall see that all brethren appear in the 
clothing prescribed by the Book of Constitution, and, to the best of 
his ability, see that every brother when in Lodge is stationed 
according to rank. 

STEWARDS 

12. The Stewards, under the direction of the Director of Ceremonies, 
shall assist him in the preparation of the Lodge Room, The Senior 
Steward, assisted by the Junior Steward and other brethren when 
directed by the Worshipful Master, shall make the necessary arrangements 
for refreshments on all occasions. 

INNER GUARD 

13. The Inner Guard shall attend each meeting punctually at the 
appointed hour, guard the interior of the Lodge, receive visitors, 
insure that brethren for admission are properly clothed and give 
direction to the Tyler. 

TYLER 

14. The Tyler shall be in regular attendance and diligently watch 
the exterior of the Lodge. He shall see that all brethren register 
their names before entering the Lodge. He shall see that the furniture 
and ornaments are kept in good order, and perform such other duties 
as the Lodge or its Officers may direct. 



6 - 



ORGANIST 

15. The Organist shall be responsible for the musical part of the 
ceremonies and such other harmonious duties as the Worshipful 
Master may direct. 

HISTORIAN (Not an Officer) 

16. The Historian shall keep a faithful chronicle of the important 
and significant Lodge events during his term of office. A written 
summary of the previous year's history, including special events 
is to be submitted annually to the Worshipful Master before the 
Regular Meeting in September, for the Historical Record of the Lodge, 

AUDITORS 

17. The Auditors shall, annually, and at such other times when 
called upon by the Committee of General Purposes or the Lodge, 
audit the books, accounts and other records of the Treasurer and 
Secretary and shall examine the investments and other securities 
of the Lodge. They shall present a report in writing to the Lodge 
on the night of and before the Installation of the Worshipful 
Master and at any other time the Worshipful Master may direct. Such 
report shall show all receipts and disbursements as well as all the 
assets and liabilities of the Lodge up to the end of the financial 
year. 

SCRUTINEERS 

18. The Worshipful Master shall, on the occasion of the Election of 
Officers, appoint two brethren as Scrutineers of the 3allot. They 
shall examine the ballots, and report the results of the ballot. 
Immediately after the election of an officer has been declared by 
the Worshipful Master, the used ballots for such election shall be 
destroyed. 

ARTICLE VII- COMMITTEES 

1. Committees are a very important part of the organizational 
structure of this unique Lodge. They not only ensure a democratic 
process of lodge government and provide a means for active 
participation by the lodge members, but also provide a measure of 
continuity for the future of the Lodge. Under good leadership, lodge 
committees, working in harmony and directed toward the aims and 
objectives, established under Article III, and the basic principles 
of Freemasonry, will provide the most desirable environment for 
the brethren to produce significant recommendations for the 
continuing success of the Lodge. 

APPOINTMENT OF COMMITTEES 

2. The Worshipful Master shall, on the day of his Installation or 
as soon thereafter as conveniently possible, appoint all standing 
and special committees, unless such appointment is provided for 
otherwise in these By-Laws. 



The active committees of the Lodge are included in the 
following list, other committees may be appointed by the 
Worshipful Master as circumstances may require* 

i General Purposes 

ii Visitation and Transportation 

iii Membership and Unattached Masons 

iv Refreshment and Entertainment 

v Masonic Information 

vi Central Data Bank 

vii Masonic Museum 

viii Lodge Library 

ix Lodge Publications 

x Reception 

ARTICLE VIII - DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 
GENERAL PURPOSES 

1. The Committee of General Purposes shall consist of the Worshipful 
Master, Senior Warden, Junior Warden, all other Lodge Officers and 
Past Masters cf the Lodge, who are obligated to attend,, and all 
Members of the Lodge, who are encouraged to attend. The Senior 
Warden shall, subject to the approval of the Worshipful Master, be 
the Chairman. The Assistant Secretary shall, subject to the 
combined approval of the Worshipful Master and Senior Warden* act 

in the capacity of Secretary of the Committee, The Committee shall 
meet at such times as the Worshipful Master shall direct.. Seven 
Members of this Committee shall constitute a quorum. 

The Committee shall be responsible for the financial affairs 
of the Lodge, It shall have full power to inspect all books, 
accounts and papers belonging to the Lodge and make recommendations 
to the Lodge relative to any alterations required therein s except 
the Minutes of the Lodge. The Committee shall have the authority 
to summon to attend its meetings, any Officer or other Members 
having possession of any books or papers belonging to the Ledge. 

The Members of the Committee shall inform themselves of all 
accounting procedures and become familiar with the method of Lodge 
payments. They shall discuss the operations and welfare of this 
Lodge in particular and the Craft in general and deal with matters 
directed to their attention during regular meetings, and bring 
their recommendations to the next regular meeting of the Lodge. 
The Secretary of the Committee shall record the minutes of all 
meetings. 

VISITATION AND TRANSPORTATION 

2. The Committee on Visitation and Transportation shall consist of 
the Junior Warden as Chairman, and the Senior and Junior Deacons. 



- 8 - 

They shall be informed, by the Secretary, of all requests for lodge 
visits and be responsible for carrying out the details of the visit 
and arrange for the most suitable method of transportation as the 
circumstances may require. 

MEMBERSHIP AND UNATTACHED MASONS 

3. Each Member of the Lodge shall assume a measure of considerable 
responsibility in this important area of masonic outreach. It 
should be the concern of every Brother to encourage unattached 
masons to renew their interest in Freemasonry, The Chairman of this 
Committee shall be appointed by the Worshipful Master, The Senior 
Deacon shall assist in the work of this Committee. 

REFRESHMENT AND ENTERTAINMENT 

k. The Senior Steward, with the assistance of the Junior Steward, 
shall be responsible for refreshments during the Social Hour at 
the conclusion of the Regular Meetings of the Lodge, and on other 
occasions when requested by the Worshipful Master* 

MASONIC INFORMATION 

5. The Committee on Masonic Information shall be guided by the first 
three objectives (Article III) established by the Lodge* The 
Members of the Committee shall be responsible for planning the non- 
business portion of all Regular Meetings of the Ledge at least one 
year in advance and preferably two years in advance on a continuing 
basis . They shall also be responsible, with the approval and 
assisxance of the Worshipful Master and Secretary, for planning 

the details of Lodge Visitations and working together with the 
Committee on Visitation and Transportation. 

CENTRAL DATA BANK 

6. The Committee on the Central Data Bank shall f in accordance with 
items *f and 7 of the Lodge Objectives (Article III) S organize and 
maintain a central inventory of items of Masonic Historical interest 
in the safe keeping of Masonic Lodges; and shall encourage such 
lodges, by providing assistance to Lodge Historians, to take an 
active interest in the History and Masonic Artifacts of their 
respective lodges. 

The composition of this Committee shall consist of no less 
than three Executive Officers (to insure continuity) and a general 
membership , made up in the main of Lodge Historians and other 
interested Masons. As the membership of this Lodge and the 
activities of this particular Committees continues to increase, 
sub-committees may be established on a Regional basis. Rotational 
Meetings, hosted by the Regional Sub-Committee, could be held 
throughout the Province and provide an important link with the 
membership at large. 

MASONIC MUSEUM 

7. The Committee on Masonic Museum shall , in accordance with Item 
6 of the Lodge Objectives (Article III) t arrange for suitable 
facilities to exhibit, for public display, important masonic 
artifacts as they become available for that purpose. 



The members of the Committee shall encourage Lodges to restore 
their own masonic artifacts and to provide suitable facilities for 
their protection and exhibition in their respective Lodges. 

The Chairman of the Committee on the Masonic Museum, shall be 
one of the Executive Officers of the Committee on the Central Data 
Bank. 

LODGE LIBRARY 

8. The unique character of The Heritage Lodge and the Objectives it 
has engaged itself to fulfill, will require resources beyond the 
capabilities of the Lodge. Some Masonic Scholars, contributing to 
the Lodge Programs, will rely on their private collections or other 
sources, and would find it inconvenient to operate from a common 
source. Nevertheless, books are being donated to the Lodge and these 
should be made available to the Brethren, especially young masons 
searching for light and truth. 

As the future activities of the Lodge increase , a more active 
relationship between The Heritage Lodge Library and The Grand Lodge 
Library should be established and maintained. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS 

9. The Committee on Lodge Publications shall.- in accordance with the 
Purpose and Objectives (Article III) of the Lodge s be responsible for 
the publication of Lodge Bulletins, Proceedings, Books and other 
material in connection with the extension activities of the Lodge. 

The Committee shall recommend, for approval by the Lodge, an 
Editorial Board consisting of not less than three members. It shall 
be the responsibility of the Board to establish and maintain, subject 
to the approval of the Lodge, an Editorial Policy for Lodge Publications, 

All material received for publication shall be reviewed, edited 
and approved in compliance with the Editorial Policy, 

RECEPTION 

10. The Committee on Receptions shall consist of three or more 

m embers appointed by the Worshipful Master. The Chairman shall be, 
subjectto the approval of the Worshipful Master, the Director of 
Ceremonies. The Committee shall receive visitors and make arrangements 
to hold Boards of Trial. 

REPORTS 

11. All Committees shall report annually on the activities for the 
current year. Each report shall be submitted in writing by the 
Chairman or his designate within 30 days of the end of the fiscal 
year of the Lodge . 

Immediately following their appointment and at their earliest 
convenience, all Committees shall prepare a budget for the coming 
year. These budgets shall be submitted to the Lodge Secretary before 
the next General Purpose Meeting of the Lodge. 



-10 - 

ARTICLE IX - MEMBERSHIP 
ADMISSION TO MEMBERSHIP 

1. Every applicant for membership in this Lodge shall complete and 
sign the petition in accordance with the form prescribed by the 
Grand Lodge; which shall be passed on to the Secretary before the 
next Regular Meeting duly signed by the proposer arid seconder who 
shall be Master Masons in good standing in the Lodge. 

The petition shall be received in open lodge and upon acceptance 
shall be referred to a special committee of investigation who shall 
report to the Lodge at the next Regular Meeting, or as soon thereafter 
as possible. 

No petition shall be balloted upon by the Lodge unless notice 
thereof, stating particularly the full name s age, occupation and 
residence of the applicant, shall have been given in the summons for 
the meeting at which the petition is to be considered. 

HONORARY MEMBERSHIP 

2. Any Brother, whether a member of this Lodge or not, who has 
rendered exemplary service to this Lodge , or the Craft in general, 
may, by proper procedure, be elected an Honorary Member of this Lodge, 

The procedure requires a written recommendation from two 
members in good standing in the Lodge. A notice of motion together 
with the names of the two members making the recommendation must 
appear in the summons for the next Regular Meeting f when a three- 
fourths ballot vote of the members present shall be required for 
election to honorary membership. 

Honorary Membership does not confer the right of voting in 
the Lodge, unless specifically conferred by a unanimous ballot at 
the time of such election to Honorary Membership, 

RESIGNATION OP MEMBERS 

3. Save as hereafter provided, any member desiring to withdraw from 
the Lodge and not in arrears for dues may resign, and upon so doing 
he shall be furnished with a certificate of his standing. Such 
resignation shall take effect from receipt of same by the Secretary 
and shall be reported to the next Regular Meeting of the Lodge. 

The Lodge may by resolution accept the resignation of a member 
in arrears for dues 8 in which case the certificate of his standing 
shall state the fact and the amount of his indebtedness. 

No member who is under suspension or against whom a charge of 
unmasonic conduct is pending shall have the right or be permitted to 
resign. 



11 



ARTICLE X - RULES OF ORDER 



1. The Order for Business at Regular Meetings of the Lodge shall be 
at the discretion of the Worshipful Master. 

2. The Worshipful Master may require any motion to be put in writing 
with the names of the mover and seconder appended thereto; no motion 
shall be open for discussion until presented to the Lodge by the 
Worshipful Master. 

3. All motions shall be decided by a majority of votes, unless 
otherwise provided. In the case of a tie vote, the Worshipful 
Master shall have the casting vote. 

4. The votes of the members are given by each inclining upwards his 
right hand, which shall be counted by the Worshipful Master or the 
Deacons, unless the numbers should be so unequal as to render 
counting unnecessary. 

5. No Brother shall speak more than once on the same question with- 
out the permission of the Worshipful Master, unless in explanation, 
or in the case of the person introducing the motion to make a reply. 

6. Any Brother wishing to speak to the question or to submit a motion 
shall rise and remain standing, and when recognized shall respect- 
fully address the Worshipful Master confining his remarks to the 
question and observing due order and decorum, 

7. On a point of order being raised while a Brother is speaking, or 
when a Brother is called to order by the Worshipful Master, the 
Brother so interupted shall at once take his seat: when the point 
of order has been made by the Brother objecting, the Worshipful 
Master shall decide thereupon without the question being debated. 
The Brother may then proceed in the proper form. 

8. No amendment to a motion shall be in order after an amendment to 
an amendment, unless to table the motion. 

ARTICLE XI - VOTE ON THE BALLOT 

1, In balloting on a petition, every Member present must vote. All 
Members must therefore come up. to the performance of trust with 
firmness, candor, and a full determination to do right; to allow 
no personal timidity to forbid the deposit of a black ball if the 
applicant is unworthy, and no liberal prejudice to prevent the 
depositation of a white ball if the character and qualifications 
of the candidate are unobjectionable. 

2. No Member can be called to an account for the ballot he has 
deposited. 

3. No applicant shall become a member of the Lodge, if on the 
ballot more than two black balls appear against him. 



- 12 



*K When an applicant has been black bailed^ he is to be notified 
by the Secretary, and the matter should remain the profound secret 
between the members of the fraternity and the applicant. 

5. It is a gross masonic offence for any member to make public the 
action of the Lodge in black balling an applicant. 

ARTICLE XII - FEES' AND DUES 



INITIATION 

1. The fee for initiation shall be $500.00 which shall include the 
Grand Lodge Fee for registration and certificates and a Master 
Mason's apron. The annual dues shall be pro-rated on the basis of 
$1 . 00 for each month remaining from the date of membership into the 
Lodge until the following September 1st to a maximum of $10.00. 

AFFILIATION 

2. The fee for affiliation shall be $10,00 plus $1.00 for each 
month remaining from the date of membership into the Lodge until 
the following September 1st, to a maximum of $10.00. 

ANNUAL DUES 

3. The annual dues for each Member shall be $10.00 payable in advance 
and become due annually on September 1st, 



ARTICLE XIII - ARREARS OF FEES AND DUES 

1. Any Brother who is in arrears of fees and dues after twelve months 
from the date they become due shall have his case dealt with by the 
Lodge according to the rules and regulations as set forth by Grand 
Lodge in the Book of Constitution. 



ARTICLE XIV - RESTORATION 

1. A Brother may be restored to good standing, providing his case 
is dealt with by the Lodge according to the rules and regulations 
as set forth by Grand Lodge in the Book of Constitution. 



ARTICLE XV - FINANCIAL YEAR 



1. The financial year shall terminate on the last day of August 
of each year. 



13 - 



ARTICLE XVI - LODGE FUNDS 

1. There shall be two funds maintained in the name of the Lodge, in 
a Chartered Bank or Trust Company as approved by the Lodge. The 
Funds shall be known as (a) The Operating Fund, (b) The Capital 
Fund. The signing officers for the Lodge shall be the Worshipful 
Master, the Secretary, and the Treasurer, any two of whom may sign. 

THE OPERATING FUND 

2. The Operating Fund shall be maintained by annual dues collected 
from members. From this fund shall be paid the normal expenses of 
the Lodge; such as Grand Lodge dues, District tax, rent, printing; 
postage, etc. Expenditures will be controlled through a budget set 
up annually by the Committee of General Purposes and presented to 
the Lodge for approval at the Regular Meeting in November each year. 

THE CAPITAL FUND 

3. The Capital Fund, initially established by Charter Membership 
fees, shall be augmented by initiation and affiliation fees as 
received, and by bequests and other monies specially dedicated to 
it. The Fund shall be invested in Charter Bank or Trust Company 
Certificates or similar securities. 

^. When the cash balance in the Capital Fund is sufficient to warrant 
further investment, the Treasurer shall report the fact to the 
Committee of General Purposes, who may recommend to the Lodge that 
such investment be made. If the recommendation is approved, the 
Lodge shall authorize the Treasurer to invest a specific sum in 
suitable securities. The purchase, of such securities shall be made 
by cheque. 

5. Under normal circumstances the principal sum in the Capital Fund 
shall not be disturbed, but the income from the investments held by 
the fund, may be applied to the acquisition of Masonic artifacts, 
memorabilia, documents; and other items of historical value, by 
resolution of the Lodge. At a suitable time in the future and by a 
resolution of the Lodge, the interest and a substantial amount of 
the principal may be used for the purchase of suitable facilities 
for the development of a Masonic Museum. 

6. All monies received by the Secretary, Treasurer, or any other 
person on behalf of the Lodge, shall be deposited forthwith to the 
credit of the Lodge in the appropriate account. The Treasurer shall 
review the funds from time to time, and shall recommend to the 
Committee of General Purposes transfers fromone account to another 
as he deems desirable. 



- Ik 



iRTICLE XVII - VISITORS 



1. No visitor shall be admitted into the Lodge, unless he is 
personally vouched for, or after due examination by one or more 
members present, nor unless he shall have entered his name. Masonic 
rank, the name of his mother lodge or the lodge from which he hails, 
in a book to be kept by the Lodge for that purpose; and during his 
continuance in the Lodge he shall be subjected to its By-Laws, 



ARTICLE XVIII - CONTINGENCIES 

1. Should any contingency arise which is not provided for in these 
By-Laws, the Lodge shall be guided in its action by Ancient Masonic 
usage, and the Constitution of the Grand Lodge of Canada in the 
Province of Ontario. 



ARTICLE XIX - ALTERATIONS TO THE BY-LAWS 



1. No additions, alterations or amendments shall be made to these 
By-Laws except by notice of motion given at a Regular Meeting: 
entered in the minutes and printed in the summons for the next 
Regular Meeting-, at which time the motion being duly moved and 
seconded and supported by at least two-thirds of the votes then 
present, the proposed amendment shall be submitted to the Grand 
Master, and upon his approval, the amendment shall be effective s 
of which every Member shall receive notice, and all unissued copies 
of the By-Laws shall be so amended. 



ARTICLE XX - SIGNING OF BY-LAWS 

1. These By-Laws, when incorporated in the Lodge Register, shall be 
signed by the Worshipful Master and Secretary, and have the seal of 
the Lodge affixed. Every Brofher is also to sign them as a 
declaration of submission thereto, and one copy shall be delivered 
to each Member without charge upon initiation or affiliation. 



- 13 - 

GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 

1978 - 1979 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 
M.W.Bro. Robert E. Davies 
P.O. Box 370, Mount Forest, NOG 2L0 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 
R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards 
59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2H^ 

GRAND SECRETARY 

M.W.Bro. J. A. Irvine 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, Ont. , L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R.W.Bro. Burton S. Freer 

R.R. No. 6, Cambridge (Gait), Ont., N1R 5S7 



THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 730 
LODGE OFFICERS 
(See Page 12) 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 



General Purpose, 

Visitation & Transportation 
Membership & Unattached Masons 
Refreshment & Entertainment 
Masonic Information, 
Central Data Bank, ....,, 

Masonic Museum, , 

Lodge Library, 

Furnishings, Eqpt. & Regaiia 5 
Lodge Seal & Banner, 

Lodge By-Laws, 

Lodge Publications , 



(S.W.), R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn 

(J.W.), R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton 

R.W.Bro. Edmund V. Ralph 
(S.S.), W.Bro. Robt. J. Welt 

R.W.Bro. Gary J. Powell 

W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley 

V. W.Bro. Jacob (Jack) Pos 

R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 

W.Bro. Malcolm Morin 

V. W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell 

R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn 

R.W.Bro. John B. Hunter 



NOTE: Help is needed for the above Committees, please contact the 
appropriate Chairman directly, or volunteer your services to 
the Worshipful Master or Lodge Secretary. 



COMING EVENTS 

Nov. 15, 1978, The Heritage Lodge, Installation, 
R.W.Bro. C. John Woodburn, I.M. 

Nov. 23, 1978, Wellington District, 18th Century Degree Team, 
to be presented in the Scarborough Temple under 
the auspices of the Committee on Masonic Education 
for Toronto District 3. 



|3roceebings 

OTje heritage Hotrge J?o.730 



a.jf.&a.jfl., #.ft.c. 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

Jacob Pos 

W.M. 

10 Mayfield Ave. , 

Guelph, Ontario, 

NIG 2L8 

(519) 821-4995 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

J. A. Faulkner 

3e 'y 

22 Scho Drive, 

Guelph, Ontario, 

NIG 1H2 

(519) 82^-2873 



Vol. 02, No. 03 



Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



November, 1978 



This Bulletin includes the Summons for the next Regular 
Meeting, the Proceedings of the Sixth Regular Meeting held on 
Wednesday, October 18th, 1978, and several important announcements, 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sir and Brother: 



I am directed by the Worshipful Master to request your 
attendance at a Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, to be 
held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple at the North-East corner 
of the intersection of Highways 401 and 2k on, 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, NOVEMBER 15th, 1978, at 7: 30 p.m. 

prompt for the purpose of transacting such business as may be regularly 
brought before the Lodge, and the Installation and Investiture of the 
Officers for the year 1978-79. 

Fraternally, 

J. A. Faulkner, Sec'y 

PROCEEDINGS 

The Sixth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, was 
held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, 
October 18, 1978, with Ik Officers, 22 Members and 2 Visitors present. 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7*^0 p.m. The 
Chaplain, Bro. Rev. W.G. Rivers presented a reading and words of 
enlightenment from the V.S.L. which was followed by an opening prayer. 
The Worshipful Master welcomed the Brethren to the first Election for 
the Lodge and expressed his pleasure at seeing so many present even 
though the Postal Dispute had made it extremely difficult to get all 
the summonses delivered to most of the Brethren before the meeting. 

1. APOLOGIES 

Written apologies were received from R.W.Bro. C.E. Drew and 



W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley; W.Bro. John Brittain extended apologies on 
behalf of R. W.Bro. G.Ivor Davies and R. W.Bro. W.J. Curtis; V. W.Bro. 
Randall Langs brought apologies from R. W.Bro. Donald Grinton. 

2. CONFIRMING MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R. W.Bro. Keith Flynn, seconded by 
Bro. George Zwicker, that the minutes of the Fifth Regular Meeting, 
held on Wednesday, September 20, 1978, and the subsequent Emergent 
Meeting held on Saturday, September 23, 1978, be adopted as circulated 
in the previous Lodge Summons. Carried. 

3. REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PETITIONS 

The Reports of the Committees on Petitions for Affiliation, as 
recorded in the Lodge Proceedings dated October, 1978, Vol. 02, No. 02, 
with the exception of three Committees who had not been able to mail 
in their returns, reported favourable for 19 of the 22 Applications. 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. John Brittain, seconded by 
R. W.Bro. Keith Flynn, that the Reports be received, the Committees be 
discharged with the appreciation of the Lodge, and the 19 Applications 
balloted on. Carried. 

4. CORRESPONDENCE 

One item of correspondence was received from M. W.Bro. J. A. 
Irvine, Grand Secretary, which included a revised copy of the proposed 
Restructured Constitution, and instructions for its review. 

5. PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts, amounting to $244.61, were presented, 
and on a motion by R. W.Bro. R.E. Groshaw, seconded by V. W.Bro. R.D. 
Langs, were ordered payed. Carried. : 

Secretary's Account: 

Postage, $38.00 

Stationary, 7. li t $ 45.11 

Kopy Print, Guelph: 
October Summons, 
(350 copies @ 32 pages each) 174.50 

Grand Lodge: 

Warrant of Constitution 25.00 

Total $ 244.61 

6. RECEIVING PETITIONS 

The following Petitions for Affiliation were received from: 

1. JACKSON, John Ross, M.M.; R.R. #1, Arthur, Ontario; Age 29; 
Teacher; member of Wellington Lodge No. 271, G.R.C.; recommended by 
R. W.Bro. A. Harold Copeland and W.Bro. J. David Butcher. 

2. PLYLEY, John M. , D.D.G.M.; P.O. Box 40, 2485 Stevensville 
Road, Stevensville, Ontario; Age 48; Professional Engineer; member of 
Dominion Lodge No. 615, G.R.C.; recommended by R. W.Bro. Wallace E. 
McLeod and W.Bro. C.E. Balfour LeGresley. 

3. WESTFALL, Stanley Ray, M.M.; City of Oshawa, County of 
Durham; Age 35; Salesman; member of Lebanon Lodge No. 139i G.R.C.; 
recommended by R. W.Bro. W. Gordon Bunker and W.Bro. W.H. Perryman. 



- 3 - 

It was regularly moved by Bro. George Zwicker, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, that the Petitions be received and the usual 
Committees appointed. Carried. 

7. REPORTS OF STANDING AND APPOINTED COMMITTEES 

V.W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell, Chairman of the Lodge Seal and 
Banner Committee, presented a brief report on the progress of the 
Committee (the Lodge had received the new seal at the last Regular 
Meeting) , and asked any members who were interested in the design of 
a proposed dues card, to meet with him for a few minutes following 
the close of the Lodge. 

8. GENERAL BUSINESS 

The revised copy of the proposed Restructured Constitution of 
the Grand Lodge, was passed on to R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn, Chairman of 
the Lodge By-Laws Committee for review, with instructions to submit 
their report at the next Regular Meeting of the Lodge. 

A brief discussion ensued concerning lodge stationary and 
the format for the dues card. 

At this time, the Worshipful Master reminded the Brethren of 
the Notice of Motion that had been presented at the last Regular 
Meeting, concerning the Lodge By-Laws. 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn, seconded by 
Bro. George Zwicker, that the Lodge adopt the By-Laws as proposed in 
the Proceedings of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, Vol. 02, No. 02, dated 
October, 1978. 

Before calling for the vote, additional copies were passed 
out to those members of the lodge who had not received them in the 
mail. Following a short period of discussion, during which time no 
changes were proposed, the question was called for, and the above 
motion was passed unanimously. 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. H.G. Edgar, seconded by W.Bro. 
John E. Brittain, that an expression of appreciation be extended to 
the Worshipful Master and his wife Daisy, for their work in personally 
delivering so many notices during the recent mail strike of the 
inside postal workers. The motion was carried by the applause of the 
Brathren. 

9. BALLOTING 

Following a favourable ballot taken collectively on the 19 
Applications for Affiliation, the Worshipful Master declared R.A.Bros. 
Leonard Richard Hertel, William A.H. Lowe, Joel Charles Piper; V.W. 
Bros. William A. Brooks, Harry C. May, Eric Sisel; W.Bros. Terry V. 
Horner, Robert W.T. Lewis, Ronald W. Lewis, William H. Perryman, 
Leonard James Spooner; and Bros. Raymond Crinklaw, Stanley A.M. Glass, 
Donald G. Hines, E. Warren Lay, John. A. McCallum, elegible for member- 
ship in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, by affiliation. 

10. ELECTION OF OFFICERS 

At this time V.W.Bro. Pos called on W.Bro. James McNiel and 
Bro. Harvey Childerhose, to act as Scrutineers for the Election of 
Officers. Following the regular ballot procedure, the following 
Officers were elected and, upon accepting the office, each was declared 
as such by the Worshipful Master. 



- 4 - 

Worshipful Master - Elect, R.W.Bro. Keith R.A. Flynn 

Senior Warden - Elect, R.W.Bro. Donald G.S. Grinton 

Junior Warden - Elect, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw 

Secretary - Elect, W.Bro. James A. Faulkner 

Treasurer - Elect, R.W.Bro. W. Edwin C. Wilson 

The Scrutineers were thanked by the applause of the Brethren 
for their assistance in the election of officers. 

The Worshipful Master called for nominations for" the Office 
of Tyler, and for the position of Auditors. 

R.W.Bro. KEITH Flynn nominated R.W.Bro. William S. McVittie 
for Tyler. 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. R.E. Groshaw, seconded by 
Bro. G.E. Zwicker, that nominations be closed. Motion Carried. The 
Worshipful Master then declared R.W.Bro. Wm.S. McVittie as Tyler - 
Elect for the ensuing Masonic year. 

R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson nominated V. W.Bro. Robert S. McMaster 
and V. W.Bro. W. Robert Lawson as Auditors. 

It was regularly moved by Bro. G.E. Zwicker, seconded by V.W. 
Bro. R.D. Langs, that nominations be closed. Carried. The Worshipful 
Master then declared V.W. Bro. R.S. McMaster and V.W. Bro. W.R. Lawson, 
as Auditors for The Heritage Lodge No. 730, for the ensuing Masonic 
year. 

It was regularly moved by Bro. George E. Zwicker, seconded by 
Bro, R.S. Throop. that V.W. Bro. J. Pos, R.W.Bro. R.S. Sparrow, and 
V.W. Bro. R.D. Langs, be the Examining Board for the Master Elect. 
Carried. 

Following a few announcements and greetings from various 
Lodges, and a special invitation from Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers to partake 
of refreshments in the Banquet Hall, the Lodge was closed in harmony 
at 9*35 P.m. 



THE HERITAGE LODGE NO. 730 
MASONIC DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVES 

This is the first opportunity we have had to list the names 
and addresses of the District Representatives for the Lodge. There 
are members of the Lodge from each of the Districts listed, although 
we do not have a representative from all the Districts. If you would 
like to volunteer your assistance for any one of the Districts for 
which we do not have a representative, please notify V.W. Bro. J. Pos. 

BRANT MASONIC DISTRICT 

R.W.Bro. Fred William Bowery; 44 Park Rd. N., Brantford, 
Ontario, (519) 752- #38 

BRUCE MASONIC DISTRICT 

R.W.Bro. E. James Scarborough; 316 9th Street, Hanover, 
Ontario, N4N 1L4, (519) 364-1040 

CHATHAM MASONIC DISTRICT 

R.W.Bro. Edsel C. Steen; 286 Lome Ave., Wallaceburg, Ontario 
N8A 3Z2, 



- 5 - 

CHATHAM MASONIC DISTRICT 

K. W.Bro. .-ids el C. Steen; 286 Lome Ave., Jallaceburg, Ontario, 
N8A 3Z2, (519) 627-6633 

FRONTENAC MASONIC DISTRICT 

W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe; 2^3 Helen St., Kingston, Ontario, 
K7L 4P5, (613) 5^2-562/ 

GREY MASONIC DISTRICT 
HAMILTON MASONIC DISTRICT A 

HAMILTON MASONIC DISTRICT C 

LONDON MASONIC DISTRICT W 

MUSKOKA-PARRY SOUND MASONIC DISTRICT 

NIAGARA MASONIC DISTRICT A 

W.Bro. George A. Campbell; 41 Albert St., St. Catharines, 
Ontario, L2R 2C-8, (41 6) 684-7803 

NIAGARA MASONIC DISTRICT E 

R. W.Bro. William A.H. Lowe; 6151 Gulp St., Niagara Falls, 
Ontario, L2G 2B6, (4l6) 354-0457 

NORTH HURON MASONIC DISTRICT 

W.Bro. James DeZeeuw; P.O. Box 64, Elora St., Teeswater, 
Ontario, NOG 2S0, 

ONTARIO MASONIC DISTRICT 

(Temporary) Bro. Robert S. Throop; R.R. #2, Taunton Rd. E. , 
Oshawa, Ontario, L1H 7K5, (416) 723-0622 

PETERBOROUGH MASONIC DISTRICT 

Bro. George E. Zwicker; 499 O'Connel Rd. , Peterborough, 
Ontario, K9J 4E1 , (705) 7^3-2113 

PRINCE EDWARD MASONIC DISTRICT 

Bro. Robert S. Throop; R.R. #2, Taunton Rd. E. , Oshawa, 
Ontario, L1H 7K5, (416) 723-0622 

ST. LAWRENCE MASONIC DISTRICT 

V. W.Bro. Donald J. Woodside; 81 Park St., Brockville, 
Ontario, K6V 5W1 , (613) 3^2-2243 

SARNIA MASONIC DISTRICT 

SOUTH HURON MASONIC DISTRICT 

R. W.Bro. Keith R.A. Flynn; P.O. Box 119, Main St., Atwood, 
Ontario, NOG 1B0, (519) 356-2845 

TORONTO MASONIC DISTRICT 1 

R. W.Bro. James W. Gerrard; 82 Glenwood Cres., Toronto, 
Ontario, M4B 1K1, (416) 755-67^6 



TORONTO MASONIC DISTRICT 2 

V.W.Bro. Albert L. Lee; 453 Broadway Ave . , Toronto, Ontario, 
M4G 2R4, (1*16) 422-0121 

TORONTO MASONIC DISTRICT 3 

R.W.Bro. C. Edwin Drew; 5 Scotland Road, Agincourt, Ontario, 
MIS 1L5, (416) 293-9587 

TORONTO MASONIC DISTRICT 4 

(Temporary) R.W.Bro. C. Edwin Drew; 5 Scotland Rd. , Agincourt, 
Ontario, MIS 1L5, (4l6) 293-9587 

TORONTO MASONIC DISTRICT 5 

R.W.Bro. Edmund V. Ralph; 56 Castlegrove Blvd., Don Mills, 
Ontario, M3A 1L2, (416) 442-4152 

TORONTO MASONIC DISTRICT 6 

Bro. Thomas G. Roberts; 7 Mira Road, Thornhill, Ontario, 
L3T 2H5, (416) 889-9167 

TORONTO MASONIC DISTRICT 7 

W.Bro. C.E. Balfour LeGresley; 213 Riverside Dr., Toronto, 
Ontario, M6S 4A8, (41 6) 769-3804 

WATERLOO MASONIC DISTRICT 

R.W.Bro. William S. McVittie; 50 Renwick St., Cambridge (H), 
Ontario, N3C 2T7, (519) 658-2334 

WELLINGTON MASONIC DISTRICT 

R.W.Bro. W. Edwin C. Wilson; 7 Orchard Blvd., Georgetown, 
Ontario, , (41 6) 877-3556 

WILSON MASONIC DISTRICT 

V.W.Bro. Stewart L. Thurtell; 329 Oxford St., Ingersoll, 
Ontario, N5C 2W4, (519) 485-2283 

Brethren these are our District Representatives, a few are 
assisting temporarily in two Districts, until such time when others 
volunteer their services. While the primary role of the D.R. is to 
assist in the processing of applications for affiliation, they may 
also be called on as the extension arm of the Lodge in their respective 
Districts should anyone wish to contact them for any matter relating 
to Masonic History, and the acquisition and preservation of Masonic 
Artifacts. 



ANNOUNCEMENTS 

November 15. 1978: 

The Installation and Investiture of the Officers of The 
Heritage Lodge No. 730, will be under the direction of R.W.Bro. C. 
John Woodburn, I.M., assisted by a large number of Charter Members, 
Regular Members and a few interested Masons. R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn, 
the Master-Elect, has been an active Founding Member of the Lodge 
from the very beginning, as have many of the other Officers; therefore 
let us demonstrate our support with an excellent attendance at this 
important function of the Lodge. Call a few friends and bring a 
car load. 



November 23, 1978: 

The Wellington District, 18th Century Degree Team will be 
dramatizing this Ancient and Historical Degree in the Scarborough 
Masonic Temple under the auspices of the Committee on Masonic 
Education for Toronto District 3. A typical lodge meeting of the 1770*s 
will be presented, as well as the Ceremony of Initiation. The cast 
will be in full costume of the period. 

May 11 & 12, 1979: 

The Regional Masonic Workshops, which are normally held every 
third year, will be held in the spring of 1979 on the dates indicated 
above. The Guest Speaker, who will be with us for both days, is R.W.. 
Bro. Allen E. Roberts, Past D.D.G.M. and Past Deputy Grand Secretary 
of the Grand Lodge of Virginia. He is a renowned Masonic Scholar and 
Author. This promises to be an exciting experience for all who can 
attend. The Conference Facilities at the University of Guelph have 
been temporarily booked for the occasion. Mark the date and plan to 
attend. 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 

1978 - 1979 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 
M.W.Bro. Robert E. Davies 
P.O. Box 370, Mount Forest, NOG 2L0 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 
R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards 
59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2Kk 

GRAND SECRETARY 
M.W.Bro. J. A. Irvine 
Drawer 217, Hamilton, Ont., L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 
R.W.Bro. Burton S. Freer 
R.R. No. 6, Cambridge (Gait), Ont., N1R 5S7 

LODGE OFFICERS 

W.M. V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos J.S. V.W.Bro. W.Robt. Carpenter 

I. P.M. R.W.Bro. N. Richard Richards Tyler R.W.Bro. Wm. S. McVittie 

S.W. R.W.Bro. Keith R.A. Flynn Sec'y W.Bro. James A. Faulkner 

J.W. R.W.Bro. Donald G.S. Grinton A. Sec'y W.Bro. J.J. Vliehs 

S.D. R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw Treas. R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson 

J.D. Bro. George E. Zwicker D.C. R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 

I.G. W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley Chap. Bro. Rev. W.G. Rivers 

S.S. W.Bro. Robert J. Welt Organist 

COMMITTEE CHAIRMEN 

General Purpose, (S.W.), R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn 

Visitation & Transportation, (J.W.), R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton 

Membership & Unattached Masons, ... R.W.Bro. Edmund V. Ralph 

Refreshment & Entertainment, (S.S.) W.Bro. Robt.J. Welt 

Masonic Information, R.W.Bro. Gary J. Powell 

Central Data Bank, W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley 

Masonic Museum V.W.Bro. Jacob (Jack) Pos 

Lodge Library R.W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 

Furnishings, Eqpt. & Regalia W.Bro. Malcolm Morin 

Lodge Seal & Banner, V.W.Bro. Stewart L. Thurtell 

Lodge By-Laws, R.W.Bro. Keith R.A. Flynn 

Lodge Publications R.W.Bro. John B. Hunter 



Ctje heritage Hobge jHo.730 

a. jr. & &. jii., #.&.c. 

INSTITUTED: September 21, 1977 - CONSTITUTED: September 23, 1978 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple 

The formation of this unique Lodge marks the establishment 
of a common forum for all interested masons who have a real concern 
for preserving the past and influencing the future development of 
Freemasonry. The purpose and objectives of the Lodge have been 
delineated in the By-Laws and offer a seven point program to provide 
challenging opportunities to encourage participation in scholarly 
research, and a variety of other interesting subjects designed to 
encourage masons and lodges to take an active interest in the 
preservation of our Masonic Heritage. 

Application for Affiliation 

To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730, of the Grand Lodge of A.F,& A.M. of Canada, in the 
Province of Ontario. 



' tPrint'name 'in* full) ' " ' * (Address) 



of < , ............. phone ( ) . 

(Town or City) (Code) 

in the County of , and , 

(County) (Province) 

Occupation , date of birth . . . 



being a .Mason, and desirous of becoming a member 

(Masonic Rank) 
of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, do declare as follows: 

I am not in debt to any Lodge for dues or otherwise. 



I was Initiated .,....,.., Passed & Raised in 
(Date) 



Lodge No , at , under the juris- 
diction of the Grand Lodge of , and am in good 

Masonic standing. I was last a member of Lodge No. ... 

Dated at , this day of 19*. 

Signature in full 

Recommended by : 1 

2 

The Lodge meets on the third Wednesday of Sept. , Nov. , March and May. 

Affiliation Fee, $10.00 

Annual Dues (Sept. 1 - Aug. 3D. ... 10.00 

Total $ 20.00 

Return Application to: The Heritage Lodge No. 730 

10 Mayfield Avenue, 
Guelph, Ont., NIG 2L8 (519) 821-^995 



c :. . 



IDroteebings 



W^t Heritage Hobge J5o.730 



ajf.&ajfl., «.*.c 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

Keith R.A. Flynn, W.M. 
P.O.Box 119, Main St., 
Atwood, Ontario, 
NOG 1BO 

(519) 356-28^5 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

J. Pos, Editor 
10 Mayfield Ave. , 
Guelph, Ontario, 
NIG 2L8 

(519) 821-J+995 



Vol. 02, Ho. 0^ 



CambFidge, Ontario, Canada 



March, 1979 



This Bulletin includes the Summons for the next Regular Meeting, 
notice of the General Purpose Committee Meeting, Proceedings of the 
Seventh Regular Communication held on Wednesday, November 16th, 197@» 
and several important announcements for the coming year. 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 



By dircetion from the Worshipful Master you are hereby requested 
to attend the Eighth Regular Communication of the Lodge to be held in 
the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple at the North-East corner of the 
intersection of Highways No. ^01 and No. 2h on: 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MARCH 21, 1979, AT 7: 30 p.m. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such business 
as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. 

Ve shall be priviledged on this occasion to have W.Bro. Allan 
Cohoe, of Queen's Lodge No. 578, Frontenac District, and a Charter 
Member of our Lodge, present a paper titled "Some Early Masonic 
Activities in Upper Canada". Written reviews of W.Bro. Cohoe' s paper 
are being prepared by M. W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey, R.ti.Bro. Charles A. 
Sankey, W.Bro. Greg C. Robinson and Bro. John E. Taylor. An open 
discussion will 'follow the formal presentations. You are encouraged 
to bring along any masonic friends who may be interested. 



GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 



The General Purpose Committee Meeting will be held on Wednesday, 
April 18th, 1979, at ?:30 p.m. All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of 
Standing and Appointed Committees are urgently requested to attend. 
All members are particularly welcome. 



Fraternally, 

J. A. Faulkner, 



;ec'y 



PROCEEDINGS . 

The Seventh Regular Communication of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, 
was held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, 
November 15, 1978, with 13 Officers, 40 Members and 34 Visitors, for 
a total of 87 Masons present as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7: 40 p.m. 

AT THE ALTAR (Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers) 

Ephesians 6: 5-9, 

Servants, obey your human masters sincerely, with a proper 
respect and sense of responsibility, as service rendered to the Lord 
himself; not with the idea of currying favour with men, but as 
servants of the Lord, conscientiously doing what you believe to be 
the will of God for you. You may be sure that God will reward a man 
for good work, irrespectively of whether the man be slave or free. 
And as for you masters, be as conscientious and responsible towards 
those who serve you as you expect them to be towards you, neither 
misusing the power over others that has been put in your hands, not 
forgetting that you are responsible yourselves to a heavenly employer 
who makes no distinction between master and man. 

Prayer : 

Almighty God, we thank you that you have called us into this 
Fraternity and have given us tasks to perform. Bring to us the aware- 
ness that we have been entrusted with the great plans and duties of 
thy Kingdom on earth. Let -your Spirit be upon these your servants 
whom we have called into the leadership of this Lodge. Endue them 
with heavenly wisdom, that in counsel they may deal wisely, Grant 
that these brethren now entering upon their duties may obtain your 
favour and be successful in the discharge of their responsibilities, 
that through their devotion and consecration the Lodge may be increas- 
ed and edified i to the glory of Thy Most Holy Name. Amen. 

So Mote It Be 

APOLOGIES 

Apologies were received from R.W.Bro. David Bradley, currently 
visiting in Red China; from R.W.Bros. Gary Powell and Ed Ralph, who 
are officiating in their respective Districts; and from R.W.Bros. 
Wallace McLeod, Ed wilson, Irvine Noble and John Hunter. 

Also from V.W.Bro. Ralph Tucker, W.Bros. Ernest Brown and Richard 
Deacon, and Bro. Bert Steele, who are this evening participating in 
the Installation and Investiture Ceremonies in Wyndham Lodge No. 688. 

MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn, seconded by R.W. 
Bro. Don Grinton, that the minutes of the Sixth Regular Meeting, held 
on Wednesday, October 18th, 1978, be accepted as circulated in the 
Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 02, No. 03, November, 1978. Carried. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PETITIONS 

The reports of the Committees on the Petitions for Affiliation 
from V.W.Bro. Kenneth Clark and W.Bro. William Boratynec, reported 
favourable . 

It was regularly moved by Bro. George Zwicker, seconded by W.Bro. 
Balfour LeGresley, that the Reports "be received, the Committees disch- 
arged and the Applications balloted upon. Carried. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

Several items of correspondence were received, and are summarised 
as follows: 

1. Prom R.W.Bro. C. John Woodburn of Toronto District 2, enclosing 
the names of Brethren who would be participating at the Ceremony of 
Installation and Investiture of the Worshipful Master Elect and other 
Elected and Appointed Officers of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, on the 
15th day of November*- 1978. 

2. From M. W.Bro. Wm.K. Bailey of Toronto District 3» complimenting 
the Lodge on an excellent summation of the events, happenings and 
paper presentations as recorded in the Lodge Proceedings of October. 

3. From R.W.Bro. David Bradley of Toronto District 3# who also sends 
his congratulations on the comprehensive Proceedings as well as his 
apologies in not being able to attend the November Meeting. 

4. From R.W.Bro. Burton S. Freer, D.D.G.M. of Waterloo District, a 
form letter sent to all the Lodges in Waterloo District, outlining 
several points he would be emphasizing during his official visits, in 
order to make the work more interesting and ensure uniformity. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $171.25 were presented, and 
on a motion by R.W.Bro. Grinton, seconded by R.W.Bro. Groshaw were 
ordered paid. Carried. 

Secretary's Account: 

Postage , $34. 01 

Envelopes, 11.17 

Telephone, (4 months), 15.42 

Lunch (Nov. 15th, Meeting), .. 14.82 

Film Rental (G.L. of Ohio), .. 18.00 $93.42 

Guelph Printing Services Ltd. : 

Nov. Summonses, Inv. #15379 6l . 30 



Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers: 

Refreshments (Oct. 18th,) 9.65 



16.53 



Beverage supplies (Nov. 15th) 6.88 

Total $ 171.25 

RECEIVING PETITIONS 

The following Applications for Affiliation were received from: 

1. AGGETT, Harold G. , M.M.; 44 Charles St.W. Apt. 1604, Toronto, 
Ontario; Age 68; Retired Banker; member of Harry L. Martyn Lodge No, 
696, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. K.C. McLellan and W.Bro. Harry 

J . Dowse tt . 

2. BASLEY, Charles Edward, M.M.; 1195 Wood Place, Oakville, Ontario; 
Age 61; Retired; member of Oakville Lodge No. 400, G.R.C.; recommended 
by R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson and Bro. G.F. Moore. 

3. DYER, Frank G., M.M. ; 606 - 85 Thorncliff Pk. Dr., Toronto, 
Ontario; Age 71; Manager of Records; member of Ulster Lodge No. 537, 
G. R.C.j recommended by R.W.Bro. J.W. Gerrard and Bro. W.T. Boratynec. 

4. JACKSON, John Ross, M.M. ; R.R. #1, Arthur, Ontario; Age 29; 
Teacher; member of Wellington Lodge No. 271, G.R.C.; recommended by 
R.W.Bro. A.H. Copeland and W.Bro. J.D. Butcher. 

5. McNEIL, Paul W.J., P.M.; 679 Bermuda Ave., Oshawa, Ontario; Age 41; 
member of Lebanon Lodge No. 139. G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. W. 
Gordon Bunker and W.Bro. Wm.H. Perryman. 

6. PLYLEY, John M. , D.D.G.M.; P.O. Box 40, Stevensville, Ontario; Age 
48; member of Dominion Lodge No. 615, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. 
W.E. McLeod and W.Bro. C.B. LeGresley. 



- 4 - 

7. 'TE3TFALL, Stanley Hoy, M.M. ; Oshawa, Ontario; Age 35; member of 
Lebanon Lodge No. 139. G.R.C.; recommended by R.VJ.Bro. Vs. Gordon 
Bunker and V.'.3ro. ..'m.H. Ferryman. 

The Secretary reminded all sponsors of applicants, to make sure 
that application forms are filled in completely, especially full 
names and complete addresses. 

It was regularly moved by R.VJ.Bro. James K. Hutchinson, seconded 
by Bro. Rev. Cray Rivers., that the Applications be received and the 
usual Committees appointed. Carried. 

RZFOBTS OF STANDING AND APPOINTED COMMITTEES 

R.VJ.Bro.. Keith Flynn, Chairman of the Lodge By-Laws Committee, 
reported that the Lodge By-Laws, as approved at the last Regular 
Meeting, were being processed in accordance with the procedure laid 
down in the Constitution of Grand Lodge. Bro. Flynn also reported 
that the Committee was again studying the Re- organized and Revised 
Constitution in a second draft proposal presented by the Revisions 
Committee. The deadline for comments and suggestions was set as Feb. 
1st, 1979 i and as this date came before the next Regular Meeting of 
the Lodge, the Committee requested permission to discuss their report 
at the next meeting of the General Purpose Committee. 

It was regularly moved by R.V/.Bro. Flynn, seconded by R.'.'.Sro. 
"rinton, that the Lodge By-Laws Committee proceed to review the 
second draft of the Grand Lodge Revisions Committee, and present 
their findings for discussion at the next General Purpose Committee 
Meeting, and when approved, to submit their Report direct to Grand 
Lodge. Carried. 

M.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, Chairman of the Central Data Bank 
Committee, reported that a meeting was held in Toronto, November 5» 
1978, to establish Committee Structure, Terms of Reference, Operational 
Procedures, examples of Assignment Projects, continuity of Leadership, 
and that the next meeting was planned for January 31st, 1979 ■ in the 
Grand Lodge Library, 888 Yonge St. A list of 40 items of masonic 
interest and significance with a brief comment concerning the item, 
its location and the person to contact, had been prepared. It was 
planned to research the items and add to the list. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

The "orshipful Master reported that the Treasurer had requested 
authorization to transfer funds from the Capital Fund Account for 
investment purposes. 

It was regularly moved by T.T.Ero. Flynn, seconded by Y.M.Bro. 
Thurtell, that the Treasurer be instructed to purchase, from the 
Capital Fund Account, an Investment Certificate bearing interest 
at 10^ percent. Carried. 

BALLOTING FOR CANDIDATES 

Following a favourable ballot taken collectively, with the 
approval of the Lodge, the ..'orshipful Master declared V.VJ.Bro. 
Kenneth Clark and U.Bro. VJilliam J. Boratynec, elegible for membership 
in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, by Affiliation. 

RECEPTION OF DISTINGUISHED VISITORS 

This being the occasion for the Ceremony of Installation and 
Investiture, the Lodge was called from L. to R. for the space of 
10 minutes and back to L. at 8;45 p.m. 

At this time the D.C., R.V.'.Bro. Roy Sparrow, presented a most 
distinguished group of Masons led by the Deputy Grand Master, R.... 
Bro. N.R. Richards and R.;c.3ro. Burton S. Freer, D.D.G.M., Waterloo, 
Districy, followed by R.'T.Bro. C. John i.'oodward. Installing Master, 
and the Officers of the Installing Board accompanied by a large 
number of distinguished visitors. 



After receiving Grand Honours, and upon assuming the gavel, 
R.W.Bro. Richards commented that The Heritage Lodge had reached yet 
another important milestone in its initial development and wished the 
Lodge every success in the future. He then transfered the gavel to 
R ..W.Bro. Freer, who welcomed the Brethren to Waterloo District and 
expressed his desire that all should enjoy the work of the evening; 
he then returned the -gavel to the Worshipful Master. 

V.W.Bro. Pos then called on R.W.Bro. Woodburn to assume the 
Chair and proceed with the work of the evening. 

CEREMONY OF INSTALLATION AND INVESTITURE 

At the conclusion of a most impressive ceremony, R.W.Bro. Burton 
S. Freer, D.D.G.M. of Waterloo District, proclaimed the following 
Officers, with the exception of the I.G., Treasurer and Organist, 
legally and duly installed and invested: 

W.M. R.W.Bro. Keith R.A. Flynn J.S. V.W.Bro. W.Robt. Carpenter 

I. P.M. V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos Tyler R.W.Bro. Wm.S. McVittie 

S.W. R.W.Bro. Donald S. Grinton Sec. W.Bro. James A. Faulkner 

J.W. R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw A. /Sec. W.Bro. Joseph J. Vliehs 

S.D. W.Bro. George E. Zwicker D.C. R.W.BRO. Roy S. Sparrow 

J.D. W.Bro. C. Balfour LeGresley Chap. Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers 

S.S. R.W.Bro. Charles Edwin Drew 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Grinton, seconded by R. 'W.Bro. 
Groshaw, that a hearty vote of thanks be extended to R.W.Bro. John 
Woodburn and all those who participated in the work of the evening, 
for the excellent manner in which the Ceremony was conducted. Carried 
unanimously by the applause of the Brethren. 

In response and on behalf of all the Brethren assisting in the 
work, R.W.Bro. Woodburn thanked the Lodge for having been given the 
opportunity to take part on this historic occasion. 

WORSHIPFUL MASTER'S ADDRESS 

At this time the newly installed Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. 
Keith Flynn, commented as follows: 

"First my Brethren let me say that I deem this a great honour 
and a real privi ledge to have been Elected and Installed as Worshipful 
Master of The Heritage Lodge, and I thank you most sincerely. I trust 
I will not dissappoint you for the confidence you have placed in me. I 
should like to congratulate the Officers on their Installation. I feel 
confident, with the corps of Officers which have been Installed this 
evening, The Heritage Lodge should have a good year, and I truly hope, 
a year which all of us will have many fond memories. 

I would like to most sincerely thank R.W.Bro. Woodburn and his 
Installing Team for a most impressive Ceremony this evening. On 
behalf of all the Officers, I want to sincerely thank you R.W. Sir 
and your Installing Team. 

This time should not pass, without expressing my personal THANK 
YOU to V.W.Bro. Jack Pos, for first of all, having the foresight and 
leading the way to establish this Lodge, and secondly, for the un- 
limited assistance both He and his Wife Daisy have given to me. V.W. 
Bro. Pos, we have a great relationship and fraternal love, and I look 
forward to this continuing for many years ahead. 

To our many Visitors present this evening, what else can I say, 
but a most sincere THANK YOU for coming and sharing with us this very 
important event in the history of our Lodge. Please come back as 
often as you can and support us in our endeavours. I should like to 
especially THANK the Brethren of my home Lodge, Elma Lodge No. ^56, 
Monkton, for being with me this evening, and also the many Brethren 
of South Huron District, who have taken an evening from their busy 
schedule to be present. Especially I want to THANK our D.D.G.M., 



R.VJ.Bro. Earl Rawson and R.VJ.Bro. Clare Reith, who was allowed the 
pleasure of Installing me in the chair of King Solomon. Thanks again 
to all our visitors. 

To our Officers and Members, THANK YOU so much for making a 
special effort in being present this evening, but, Brethren our work 
has only begun. A foundation has been laid for us to build upon; it 
will be up to you and the Officers, who have been Installed this 
evening, as well as the Members of the various Committees of the Lodge, 
to build a superstructure on that foundation. The eyes of Masonry are 
looking to our Lodge for our achievements, so let us show realism in 
the objectives for which we were formed. I have set out a few goals 
for which we must strive during the days ahead. To achieve these 
goals, the assistance of ALL members will be needed, and I ask for 
your help. 

1. Increase the membership of the Lodge to at least 300; this 
can be realized if each Member would endeavour to bring in just 
one application during the current year. 

2. Activate our present Membership - get involved with Committee 
work, don't wait to be asked - offer your talents to the Chairman 
or myself. 

3. Strengthen the Finances of the Lodge. 

k. Encourage more Lodges in our Grand Jurisdiction to extend 
invitations to our Lodge, to make more Lodges aware of the 
objectives and workings of The Heritage Lodge. 

All in all Brethren "PARTI CIPACTI ON" should be the name of the 
game during the coming year in our Lodge. I solicit your help for us 
to achieve our goal and let us do it together. 

I look forward to a good year in The Heritage Lodge with the 
assistance of my Brethren. That is the challenge I extend to you on 
this special evening, and I most respectively seek your help, that 
our Lodge may truly fulfill its objectives, and be a credit to this 
Grand Jurisdiction in general and this District in particular. 

In closing I want to wish Seasons Greetings to you and yours 
and may the G.A.O.T.U. watch over us all. 

Following his address, the Worshipful Master announced the 
appointment of the Lodge Committees. These are presented following 
the list of Officers. 

ANNOUNCEMENTS 

At this time Bro. George Zwicker extended an invitation to all 
those present to visit with the Brethren of Corinthian Lodge No. 101, 
at their Annual Installation and Investiture Ceremonies on December 
15 » 1978, when he will be Installed as Worshipful Master. 

R.W.Bro. Woodbum reminded the Brethren of Project H.E.L.P., and 
encouraged them to continue their fine support toward reaching the 
objective of the program. 

R.VJ.Bro. Earl Rawson, extended greetings from South Huron 
District and offered his best wishes to The Heritage Lodge for the 
coming year. 

V.W.Bro. Pos announced, that immediately following the close of 
the Lodge, there v/ould be a showing of the International Gold Award 
Winning Documentary Film titled "Precious Heritage" depicting the 
story of Freemasonry in the State of Ohio, as produced by R.W.Bro. 
Allen E. Roberts, Highland Springs, Virginia. 

Following several announcements, including a special invitation 
from Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers to join in a brief social period with 
refreshments in the Banquet Hall, the Lodge was closed in harmony 
at 11:08 p.m. 



'/JORSHIPFUL MASTER H S MESSAGE 

My Brethren: 

It is my pleasure to greet you for the first time as your 

VJorshipful Kaster through the media of our Lodge Summons, and once 

again, let me say a most sincere THANK YOU for electing and installing 

me to this high office. With the assistance of the Officers and 

Members, I look forward to an active and interesting year in the 

history of The Heritage Lodge. 

From the reports I hear, most Committees of the Lodge are really 
starting to move into their objectives and responsibilities. I have^ 
enlarged the size of most committees for the coming year, with the idea 
of activating more Members. Should any Brother like to assist one of 
the Committees and has not already received such an appointment, _ I 
would be pleased to hear from you. Because the scope of membership in 
our Lodge, it is possible that sub-Committees, within some Committees, 
will be attempted, for the purpose of greater participation and 
in-put from a larger number of our Brethren. The complete list of 
Committees is published in this summons. 

Our March meeting will be one of our 'high-lights' in this 
Masonic year, when we will welcome R.W.Bro. Burton S. Freer, D.D.G.M. 
of Waterloo District, on his Official Visit. I urge the Brethren to 
make a very special effort to attend and assist me to welcome our 
distinguished 3r other as he represents the Grand Master. W.Bro. Allan 
Cohoe will present a paper also at this Meeting titled "Some Early 
Masonic Activities in Upper Canada", which should prove interesting 
and informative to all Brethren. 

We, as Masons, should never fail to remember the lessons taught 
in the N.E. Charge when we were initiated .... and now put those words 
into action .... please support the H.E.L.P. Program, and "no matter 
how small, it shall be thankfully received and faithfully applied". 

Brethren, we have critical and colossal problems- to overcome, 
not only in Canada, but throughout the world. Every generation from 
the beginning of time has had times of problems, and when the going 
was the toughest our forbearers resolved their problems by spiritual 
and moral regeneration. V/e discover that Masons had a keen sense of 
responsibility in this regard. In 1951. our late King George VI, unable 
to attend Grand Lodge because of his encroaching illness, sent a 
message to be read. In it he said, "The nation today does require 
spiritual and moral regeneration, I have no doubt, after many years 
as a member of our Order, that Freemasonry can play a most important 
part in this vital need". To do this we must all repair to our Church, 
Synagogue and Masonic Temple with one resolve and desire; to know the 
will of the Most High, and employ it, in our every relationship in 
public and private life. And so Brethren, let us gather into the flock 
those Masons who have strayed .... let us move forward together as one 
of the greatest forces of our time. Not altering Masonry to coincide 
with the cries of our changing and troublesome world, but rather 
standing firm on the tenents and principles of our Order, and doing 
our part in the shaping of a world filled with Peace, Happiness, 
Prosperity and Brotherly Love for all mankind. 

"May the Most High prosper our united endeavours. " 

Yours fraternally, 
Keith R.A. Flynn, W.M. 



Brethren, the following Calendar of Events is presented for your 
information. The events are many and varied, and should offer some- 
thing of interest for everyone. 3e sure and mark your date book now 
while they are fresh in your memory, and plan to attend all those 
functions that appeal to you. 

XARGH 21, 1979 i (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 
This is the Official Visit of R.W.Bro. Burton S. Freer, 
Z.D.2-.1'.. of ".Waterloo District. Also, W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe, 
will present an Illustrated Paper titled "Some Early Masonic 
Activities in Upper Canada". 

i.,ARCli 31, 1979 • (Saturday) - Waterloo District Reception to The Grand 
Master, Holiday Inn, Cambridge (Hespeler), Tickets v 10.00. 

APRIL 18, 1979, (Wednesday) - General Purpose Committee Meeting of 
Jhe Heritage Lodge.' All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of 
Standing and Appointed Committees are required, to attend. 
All ...embers are welcome. 

APRIL 27, 1979, (Priday) - The 18th Century Degree Cast of Wellington 
District will present their Production of a typical Lodge 
Meeting and Initiation Ceremony, in full costume, as 
practiced by our Ancient Brethren in 1774, for the Brethren 
of Ontario District. The presentation will take place in 
the Oshawa Masonic Temple, Oshawa, Ontario. 

APRIL 29, 1979. (Sunday) - 'Waterloo District Divine Service, at 7O0 

p.m., Trinity Anglican Church, 12 Blair Road, Cambridge (G). 

MAY 3, 1979 t (Thursday) - The 18th Century Degree Cast will be visiting , 
St. Clair Lodge I!o. 135, to dramatize a typical 18th Century 
Lodge Meeting and Initiation Ceremony, in their Lodge 
Meeting Place in Milton, Ontario. 

!*!AY ll-12th, 1979i (Friday £ Saturday) - The Third Regional Masonic 

Workshop will take place at the University of Guelph, Guelph, 
Ontario. The complete program is outlined on page 10. 

MAY 16, 1979» (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 
M. W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey will present a paper titled 
"Historical Review of The Constitution of Crand Lodge". 

JURE 7, 1979# (Thursday) - The Heritage Lodge will make a fraternal 

visit to The Belleville Lodge No. 123, Belleville, Ontario, 
to present a Masonic Paper dealing with The Influence of 
United Empire Loyalists on the Early Development of Prince 
Edward District. 

JULY 18-I9th, 1979, (Wednesday & Thursday) - The 12^th Annual 

Communication of Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada In the 
Province of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario. 

SEPTEMBER 19. 1979, ("'ednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage 

Lodge. Annual Election of Officers. Also, R WW. Bro. Wallace 
E. McLeod will present a paper titled "John Coustos - The 
Lisbon Inquisition". 

SZP JZ„'2.Z3. 22, 1979t (Saturday) - The Heritage Lodge willmake a Fraternal 
Visit to Corinthian Lodge Ho. 101, -to participate in their 
Saturday Program and present a "Masonic History" the subject 
title v/as left open. (This visit will have to be confirmed 
at the Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge in March. 



- 9 - 

Coming Events cont'd - 

0Cr03ER 19, 1979t (Friday) - The Heritage Lodge has been invited to 

make a Fraternal Visit to Wellington Lodge No. 635, J or onto, 
to present a Historical Paper. (This visit will have to be 
confirmed at the next Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge 
in March. 

NOVEMBER 21, 1979, (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 
Jhis is the Annual Installation and Investiture of the 
Worshipful Master and the Officers of the Lodge. Also at 
this meeting, W.Bro. Greg C. Robinson will present a paper 
titled "Morgan - The Canadian Connection". 

MARCH 18, 1980, (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 
R. W.Bro. Charles A. Sankey will present a paper which will 
be a condensation of Albert Pike's Papers on the First Three 
Degrees of Masonry. The correct title has yet to be decided. 

KAY 21, 1980, (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 

Bro. John E. Taylor, the first Mason to receive the coveted 
William Mercer Wilson Medal for his academic contributions 
to Masonic Research, Kill present a paper titled "The Lodge 
Room, Lodge Furniture, Regalia and other Masonic matters. 

Other Historical Masonic Papers to be scheduled for future 
meetings include: 

1. Quasi Masonic Bodies, not recognized by Grand Lodge; for 
example: Chinese Masons, Red Cross of Rome and Constantine , 
Rosi crucians, Prince Hall Masons etc. 

2. A discussion of missing lodge numbers. 

3. A review of the important similarities of our Grand Masters. 

k. Women Freemasons in Ontario. 

* ♦ * 

Project H.E.L.P. 

Current reports indicate that the project objective of ; 350,000 
is in sight. This is welcome news and most encouraging, but let us 
not become complacent in the knowledge that we are making good progress. 
VJe must not shift gears and coast the rest of the way. We must keep 
up the momentum as we climb the mountain until we reach the top. 

Our Lodge will soon be receiving the official receipt forms for 
tax deduction; therefore send in your donations now while the 
subject is on your mind. Several Brethren have already contributed 
sizeable donations, not only through The Heritage Lodge, but also on 
behalf of every Lodge of which they are members. 

Many dedicated Masons in the Lodges, Districts, and the Grand 
Lodge Committee have devoted generously of their time and effort in 

this worthy cause; let us contribute our share no matter how 

small the amount ..... to ensure the success of this project. 

Each contribution is an investment in the search for new and 
improved techniques, and the development of research programs to 
endeavour, to provide Hearing for Every Living Person. 

J. Pos 



- 10 - 

THIRD REGIONAL KASONIC WORKSHOP 

UNIVERSITY 0? GUELPH 
C-uelph, Ontario 

May ll-12th, 1979 
Theme Title - "Beyond The Apron" 

PR-IDA Y NIGHT BANQUET PROGRAM 

1830 - Registration, fellowship and cash bar. 

1915 - Banquet, Head Table with 10 person round tables. 

2030 - Introduce Head Table, V.VJ.Bro. Randall Langs, M.C. 

20&0 - '.Jelcome, R.'T.Bro. Gary Powell, D.D.G.M. Wellington Dist. 

2050 - Toast to Grand Lodge, 

2055 - Response, R.V/.Bro. N.R. Richards, Deputy Grand Master. 

2100 - Introduce Speaker, 

21 C5 - Keynote Speaker, R.'T.Bro. Allen E. Roberts, Highland 

Springs, Virginia. 

2150 - Thank Speaker, 

2155 - Announcements for Saturday Program, 

2200 - Late Registrations, 

- Adjourn, informal discussions and fellowship. 

SATURDAY PROGRAM 

0800 - Registration, second floor Arts Building. 

08^5 - Discussion Session No. 1, Topics - 1,2,3,^,6,7 & 8. 

1010 - Horning Break, (refreshments). 

1035 - Discussion Session No. 2, Topics - 1 ,2,3,iJ-,5, 6 & 7. 

1200 - Lunch, Delegates are on their own. 

1325 - Discussion Session No. 3, Topics - 1,2,3,5,7,8 & 9. 

1^50 - Afternoon Break, (refreshments). 

1515 - Discussion Session No. 4, Topics - *J-»5»6,7»8 & 9« 

16*K) - Adjourn. 

DISCUSSION TOPICS 
(Each Delegate will be able to participate in 4 of the 9 topics) 

1. I'TASONIC LITERATURE - Establishing your personal library. 

2. REVELATIONS - Planning the future for Freemasonry. 

3. C0MMUNI CATIONS - Applying new audio-visual concepts to 

Freemasonry. 

h. L0DTE HISTORIANS - Learning about a new Lodge Office. 

5. OUR 125th ANNIVERSARY - Suggesting individual Lodge Topics. 

6. THE CHALLENGE 0? FREEMASONRY - Keeping our Members interested. 

7. OTHER MASOrnc BODIES - Reacting on Craft Lodges. 

8. INTEREST BUILDERS - Reaching out to the Lodges, programs for 

non-masons and our ladies. 

9. LEADERSHIP - Preparing for office, lodge management, arid the 

role of Lodge Secretaries. 

This promises to be another outstanding experience in masonic 
outreach "Beyond the Apron", everyone will want to share in this 
challenging program. Cost are being determined, and Registration 
Forms will soon be available from R.VJ.Bro. VJm.S. McVittie, 50 
Renwick St., Cambridge (H), Ontario, N3C 2T7; phone 519-658-233^. 



- 11 - 

GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 
1978 - 1979 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

E. VJ.Bro. Robert E. Davies 
P.O. Box 370, Mount Forest, NOG 2L0 

DEPUTY GRAND LESTER 
R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards 
59 Green St., Guelph, N1H ZRk 

GRAND SECRETARY 

M . '.; . Br o . J . A . I rvine 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R . V, T . Bro . Burton S . Freer 

R.R. No. 6, Cambridge (Gait), N1R 5S7 







LODGE OFFICERS 










1979 




W . M . R . 


tf. Bro. 


Keith R.A. Flynn 


J.S. V. VJ.Bro. 


Robert Carpenter 


I. P.M. V. 


•J. Bro. 


Jacob Pos 


Tyler R. VJ.Bro. 


Wm. S. McVittie 


S.VJ. R. 


VJ.Bro. 


Donald 3. Grinton 


Sec'y VJ.Bro. 


James A. Faulkner 


J.W. R. 


W . Bro . 


Ronald E. Groshaw 


A/Sec'y VJ.Bro. 


Joseph J. Vliehs 


S.D. 


VJ.Bro. 


George E. Zwicker 


Treas. R. VJ.Bro. 


IV. E. Wilson 


J.D. 


VJ.Bro. 


Balfour LeGresley 


D.C. R. VJ.Bro. 


Roy S. Sparrow 


I.G. R. 


VJ.Bro. 


David C. Bradley 


Chap . Bro . 


Rev. W.G. Rivers 


S.S. R. 


VJ . Bro . 


Charles Edwin Drew 


Organi s t R . VJ . Br o . 


L.R. Her t el 






COMMITTEES FOR 1979 




GENERAI 


, PURPO 


3E - Chairman, R.W. 


Bro. Donald Grinton 


, (S.W.); all 



Chairmen of Lodge Committees; Officers and Past Masters. 

VISITATION & TRANSPORTATION - Chairman, R. VJ.Bro. Ronald Groshaw, 
(J.W.); VJ.Bro. George Zwicker, (S.D.); and VJ.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph; VJ.Bro. 
George Zv/icker, (S.D.-); V. VJ.Bro. Stewart Thurtell; VJ.Bro. Bert Mennie; 
and Bro. Robert Throop. 

REFRESHMENT & ENTERTAINMENT - Chairman, R.W.Bro. C.E". Drew, (3.S.); 
V. VJ.Bro. Robert Carpenter, (J.S.); and locally, Co-Chairman, VJ.Bro. 
Donald Kaufman; Bro. John Jones and Bro. Richard Zimmerman. 

RECEPTION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, (D.C); R.W.Bro. Wm. S. 
McVittie, (Tyler); and R.W.Bro. Charles Grimwood. 

MASONIC INFORMATION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Gary Powell; R.W.Bro. Frank 
Bruce; and V. VJ.Bro. Jack Pos. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - Chairman, V. VJ.Bro. Jack Pos; R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod; 
and R . VJ . Br o . John Woodburn . 

CENTRAL DATA BANK - Chairman, W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley; R.W.Bro. Frank 
Bruce; R.W.Bro. James Gerrard; R. VJ.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. Ronald 
Groshaw; V. VJ.Bro Jack Pos; W.Bro. Paul Engel; and Bro. Kenneth Bartlett, 

LODGE LIBRARY - Chairman, Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers; R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow; 
W.Bro. Donald Kaufman. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. Edsel 
Steen; R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey. 

DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

The duties of all Lodge Committees are defined in the Lodge By- 
Laws, see Article VIII, Sections 1 to 11. PLEASE NOTE: Immediately 
following their appointment and at their earliest convenience, all 
Committees shall prepare a budget for the coming year. These budgets 
shall be submitted to the Lodge Secretary before the next General 
Purpose Committee Meeting of the Lodge. 



tEtje heritage Xobge J!o.730 
%.■$. $c &. M., <&M.£. 

INSTITUTEDi September 21 , 1977 - CONSTITUTED! September 23, 1978 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple 

The formation of this unique Lodge marks the establishment 
of a common forum for all interested masons who have a real concern 
for preserving the past and influencing the future development of 
Freemasonry. The purpose and objectives of the Lodge have been 
delineated in the By-Laws and offer a seven point program to provide 
challenging opportunities to encourage participation in scholarly 
research, and a variety of other interesting subjects designed to 
encourage masons and lodges to take an active interest in the 
preservation of our Masonic Heritage. 

application for Affiliation 

To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730, of the Grand Lodge of A.F.& A.M. of Canada, in the 
Province of Ontario. 



' tPfint 'name ln'fuii) " ' * (Address) 



0f 'It™ ir-city) liiii) Ph ° ne ( ' • 

in the County of and , 

(County) (Province) 

Occupation , date of birth . . . 



being a .Mason, and desirous of becoming a member 

(Masonic Rank) 
of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, do declare as follows i 

I am not in debt to any Lodge for dues or otherwise. 



I was Initiated .,x. ...... Passed & Raised in 

(Date) 



Lodge No , at , under the juris- 
diction of the Grand Lodge of and am in good 

Masonic standing. I was last a member of . . Lodge No. . . 

Dated at , this day of 19. 

Signature in full , 

Recommended b> i 1 

2 

The Lodge meets on the third Wednesday of Sept., Nov., March and May, 

Affiliation Fee $10.00 

Annual Dues (Sept. 1 - Aug. 31), 10.00 

Total $ 20.00 

Return Application toi The Heritage Lodge No. 730 

10 Mayfield Avenue, 
Guelph, Ont., NIG 2L8 (519) 821-^995 



Proceedings 

Clje Heritage Hobge 3^0.730 



9.A&S.4M., «.».«. 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 

Keith R.A. Flynn, W.M, 
P.O.Box 119. Main St., 
Atwood, Ontario, 
NOG 1B0 



(519) 356-2845 



£ 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

J. Pos, Editor 
10 Mayfield Ave. , 
Guelph, Ontario, 
NIG 2L8 

(519) 821-^995 



Vol. 02, No. 



Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



May, 1979 



This Bulletin includes the Summons for the next Regular Meeting, 
Proceedings of the Eighth Regular Communication held on Wednesday, 
March 21st, 1979, and the announcements for several coming events. 

Please note that the opinions expressed by respective authors 
in these proceedings are not necessarily those of the Lodge or its 
members. 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 



By direction from the Worshipful Master, you are hereby requested 
to .attend the Ninth Regular Communication of the Lodge to be held in 
the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple at the North-East corner of 
the interesection of Highways No. 401 & No. 24 on, 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, MAY 16th, 1979, at 7:30 p.m. 

prompt for the purpose of introducing and transacting such business 
as may be regularly brought before the Lodge. 

We will be pleased to welcome on this occasion, M.W.Bro. 
Wm. K. Bailey, a Charter member of our Lodge, who will present a 
paper describing the problems and controversies in the early 
development of the Book of Constitution of The Grand Lodge; a 
most timely topic in view of the current interest in the proposed 
revisions, to be discussed at the Annual Communication of The 
Grand Lodge this coming July. Written reviews of M.W.Bro. Bailey's 
paper are being prepared by R.W.Bros. Wm. S. McVittie, Edsel C. 
Steen and David C. Bradley. Bring along a masonic friend and join 
in the lively discussion which follows the formal presentations. 

This will be our last Regular Meeting before the summer 
recess. 

Fraternally, 



@£&a^£jL^J 



J. A. Faulkner, Sec'y. 



PROCEEDINGS 

The Eighth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge, No. 730 
was held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, 
Wednesday, March 21, 1979 with 13 Officers, 29 Members and 60 
Visitors, for a total of 102 Masons as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:49 p.m., with 
the Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn in the Chair of King 
Solomon. 

VISITORS 

The Director of Ceremonies, R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, was admitted 
on two occasions , first at 7:52 p.m. to introduce, W.Bro. H.H.E. 
Erb, W.M. , Minden Lodge No. 253, Kingston; W.Bro. George A. Camp- 
bell, W.M. , Maple Leaf Lodge No. 103, St. Catharines; W.Bro. Dick 
Wolfe, W.M. , Glenrose Lodge No. 628, Elmira; and W.Bro. Ivan 
Kelley, W.M. , St. John's Lodge No. 82, Paris; and again at 8:00 
p.m. to introduce R.W.Bro. Burton S. Freer, D.D.G.M., of Waterloo 
District, on his Official Visit accompanied by R.W.Bro. Edmund 
V. Ralph, D.D.G.M. of Toronto District No. 5; R.W.Bro. Gary J. 
Powell, D.D.G.M. of Wellington District and V.W.Bros. Stuart 
Thurtell and Bob McMaster, Grand Stewards. 

All visitors received Grand Honours appropriate to their 
rank and were welcomed in a warm and friendly manner by the 
Worshipful Master. 

R.W.Bro. Freer on assuming the gavel, expressed his joy and 
anticipation for an interesting evening, and welcomed the visitors 
to Waterloo District. 

AT THE ALTAR 

The Lodge Chaplain, Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers, approached the 
Altar for the reading and the prayer: 

"Brethren: As our minds are directed this evening to the 
'Early Masonic Activities in Upper Canada', we would do well to 
heed St. Paul's advice to the early Christians, as recorded in 
the 10th Chapter of his letter to the Hebrews: "You must never 
forget these past days when you had received the light and went 
through such a great and painful struggle. It was partly because 
everyone's eye was on you as you endured harsh words and hard 
experiences, partly because you threw in your lot with those who 
suffered much the same." (J.B. Phillips). 

LET US PRAY 

Eternal Father, we would acknowledge that we come to this 
place as part of a long and enduring struggle; that our Canadian 
Heritage goes back to the founding fathers of our land. Grant 
us insight to observe and wisdom to preserve those historic tradi- 
tions of our Order, that nothing may be lost through the changing 
scenes of life. May we also be aware that what we are and what 
we do is but to honour Thy Holy Name. Amen" 

So Note It Be! 



- 3 



APOLOGIES 

Apologies were received by telephone and correspondence 
from R.W.Bro. John Woodburn, R.W.Bro. James Gerrard and W.Bro. 
Balfour LeGresley. The following Brethren brought apologies from 
those who were unable to be present: W.Bro. George Zwicker for 
R.W.Bro. James Hutchinson; W.Bro. John Brittain for R.W.Bro. G. 
Ivor Davies; R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod for M. W.Bro. Wm. K.Bailey 
and V. W.Bro. Randall Langs for R.W.Bro. Allan Broadley. 

MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Don Grinton, seconded 
by R.W.Bro. Ron Groshaw, that the minutes of the Seventh Regular 
Meeting, held on Wednesday, November 15th, 1978, be adopted as 
circulated in the Proceedings, Vol. 2, No. 4, March, 1979. 
Carried. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PETITIONS 

The Reports of the Committees on the 7 Petitions for Affil- 
iation, as appearing in the Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 2, No. 4, 
March, 1979, as well as the Petition for Affiliation from Bro. 
William Ross Tomkins, which was held over from a previous meeting, 
all reported favourable. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by V. W.Bro. R.D. Langs, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. C.E. Drew, that the Reports be accepted, the Committees 
discharged with the thanks of the Lodge, and the Applications 
balloted upon. Carried. 

CORRESPONDENCE 

Sixteen items of correspondence were received and are sum- 
marized as follows: 

1. From Bro. James Hayes J.W. , Palace Lodge No. 604, Windsor 
District, dated Nov. 18, 1978, volunteering his services 
to act as the Lodge Representative for his District. 

2. From R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards, of Wellington District, dated 
December 24, 1978, extending fraternal greetings and enclos- 
ing a substantial contribution to Project H.E.L.P. on behalf 
of The Heritage Lodge. 

3. From M. W.Bro. J. A. Irvine, Grand Secretary, dated November 21, 
1978, advising that the By-Laws of The Heritage Lodge No. 730 
have been approved by Grand Lodge. delete word (Historian) 

4. From M. W.Bro. J. A. Irvine, Grand Secretary, dated November 21 
1978, advising that the Grand Master, M. W.Bro. Robert E. 
Davies has given permission for the various officers of The 
Heritage Lodge who reside more than 25 miles from the Lodge's 
meeting place, to hold office in The Heritage Lodge. 

5. From R.W.Bro. W. Gordon Parker, Grand Secretary of the Grand 
Lodge of Quebec, a copy of his letter to M. W.Bro. J. A. Irvine, 
dated November 28, 1978, acknowledging with grateful thanks 
the receipt of a donation in the amount of $100.00 from The 
Heritage Lodge No. 730, to be used toward the cost of trans- 
lation and printing the Grand Lodge Constitution and the Work 
in French for use of Franco-phone Lodges. 



- 4 - 



6. From W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, J.D., dated December 17, 
1978, the following notation: 

... "I have just noted in my readings that Perserverence 
Lodge No. 21, in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, will be celebrating 
its 200th Anniversary next year. The Chairman of this 
activity, Donald B. Morgan, is seeking to collect items of 
historical interest related to this Lodge and to create a 
display of them for the year, after which they will be returned 

Perhaps we could encourage this as an activity for lodges 
that are now planning for their centennial. It would be a 
small number of lodges with which to deal. Perhaps we could 
help them to photograph their items and put them on display? 






Also perhaps we might consider a "field trip" to Harris- 
burg for say a weekend to fraternize with this Lodge and 
learn from them. It might be a spiritual stimulus for our 
members if nothing else. This would require some planning 
but it could be done. It might be the start of a whole 
series of such trips." 

7. From M. W.Bro. Robert E. Davies, Grand Master, a letter to 
all Lodge Secretaries, dated December 20, 1978, congratulat- 
ing the Brethren who have generously participated and contrib' 
uted toward Project H.E.L.P. As of December 20th, 1978, 
about 20% of the Brethren had contributed over 50% of the 
minimum goal. The letter concludes with sincere thanks and 
best wishes for a happy holiday season. 

8. From W.Bro. Burns Anderson, Chairman of the Committee on 
Masonic Education for Toronto District 1, dated December 30, 

1978, outlining a Masonic Education Night for April 20th, 
1979 at the West Toronto Masonic Temple on Annette Street. 
An item of special interest to our Lodge, is a talk prepared 
by R. W.Bro. James Gerrard on the organization and development 
of The Heritage Lodge and the significant contribution it 
has made and can continue to make for Freemasonry in Ontario. 

9. From W.Bro. Duncan C. Lamond, Secretary of Beaver Lodge No. 
83, dated January 9, 1979, offering his services as the 
Representative for Sarnia District. 

10. From W.Bro. M.F. Beach, Managing Editor of the Freemason, 
dated January 15, 1979, requesting the usual information 
for the Masonic Directory for 1979. Material was sent to 
him January 19, 1979. 

11. From Brother V.A. Orr, Secretary Corinthian Lodge No. 101, 
inquiring as to the possibility of a fraternal visit from 
our Lodge. This was responded to by telephone and confirmed 
by subsequent correspondence from Bro. Orr dated January 31, 

1979, that The Heritage Lodge No. 730, be invited to partic- 
ipate in a Saturday program to be held in Peterborough, 
September 22, 1979. We are to present a Masonic Paper of 
our choice. 

12. From M. W.Bro. J. A. Irvine, Grand Secretary, dated January 31, 
1979, acknowledging receipt of our comments and recommenda- 
tions Re: Proposed Revision of the Constitution. 






5 - 



13. A series of 3 letters between our Lodge and The Belleville 
Lodge No. 123, dated January 22, 31, and February 4, 1979, 
Re: Fraternal visit to The Belleville Lodge. The final 
date agreed upon is June 7, 1979. V.W.Bro. Donald Woodside, 
with assistance from W.Bro. Allan Cohoe, is preparing a 
masonic paper for the occasion. 

14. Two letters from W.Bro. Robert G. Black, Waterloo District 
Secretary, dated January 30, 1979. The first, announcing 
the Official Visit of the D.D.G.M. on March 21, 1979, and 
enclosing official forms relating to the visit; the second 
letter is a reminder of the Annual Communication of Grand 
Lodge and a request for the number of tickets required for 
the Grand Master's Banquet. 

15. From R. W.Bro. Burton S. Freer, D.D.G.M., Waterloo District, 
reminding the Brethren of three important coming events: 

i. Waterloo District Reception to the Grand Master, 
Saturday, March 31, 1979; at the Holiday Inn, 
Hespeler. Price - $10.00. 
ii. Waterloo District Divine Service, Sunday, April 

29, 1979 at 7:00 p.m. Trinity Anglican Church, 12 
Blair Rd. , Cambridge (Gait) . 
iii. Eight District Masonic Education Seminar, May 11- 
12, 1979, University of Guelph, Ontario. 

16. From W.Bro. Ernest V. Hazell, Treasurer, The Lodge of 
Research No. 2429, Leicester, England, dated March 15, 1979; 
conveying to the Worshipful Master, Officers and Brethren 
of The Heritage Lodge his very sincere Greetings and Best 
Wishes. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. George Zwicker, seconded 
by R. W.Bro. C.E. Drew, that the correspondence be received and 
any necessary action taken. Carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts amounting to $308.74 were presented, 
and on a motion by R. W.Bro. Don Grinton, seconded by R. W.Bro. 
Ron Groshaw were passed and ordered paid. Carried. 

Secretary ' s Account : 

Postage $ 42.50 
Kopy Print, Guelph (March Summons) 

(350 @ 12 pages) 120.64 

Waterloo District tax, 1978-79, @ 65C 123.50 

W.Bro. Don Kaufman, refreshments 22.10 

TOTAL $308.74 

RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications for Affiliation were received from the following: 

1. BAXTER, Arthur Albert, P.D.S.G.W. (E. Africa); 257 Arlington 
Ave., Toronto, Ontario; Age 58; Retired Engineer; Member of 
Scarborough Lodge No. 653, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. 
Balfour LeGresley and R. W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 



2. BAXTER, Dorian Arthur, S.W. ; 257 Arlington Ave., Toronto, 
Ontario; Age 29; School Teacher; Member of Scarborough Lodge 
No. 653, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley and 
R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw. 

3. FRITZLEY, Ronald, P.M.; 86 King St.W. , Burford, Ontario; 
Age 38; Automotive Finisher; Member of Burford Lodge No. 
196, G.R.C; recommended by R.W.Bro. Fred W. Bowery and V.W. 
Bro. Randall D. Langs. 

4. ISBISTER, William Andy, P.G.S.W. ; 24 Mountain Brau Rd. W. , 
Burlington, Ontario; Age 56; Contractor; Member of Seymour 
Lodge No. 272, G.R.C.; recommended by V.W. Bro. Jack Pos and 
R.W.Bro. Wm. S. McVittie. 

5. JONES, Glenson Trevelyn, M.M. ; 62 Nanook Court, Kanata, 
Ontario; Age 41; Engineer; Member of Bytown Lodge No. 721, 
G.R.C; recommended by M. W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey and V.W. Bro. 
Jack Pos. 

6. MILLER, Graeme R. , P.M.; King Street E. , Burford, Ontario; 
Age 35; Barber; Member of Burford Lodge No. 106, G.R.C; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Wm. H. Wells and V.W. Bro. Randall 
D. Langs. 

7. NEWELL, Alan Newton, P.M.; 29 Golfdale Rd., Brantford, Ontario; 
Age 56; M.D.; Member of Ozias Lodge No. 508, G.R.C; recom- 
mended by R.W.Bro. Wm. S. McVittie and V.W. Bro. James Lumley. 

8. RICHARDSON, Leslie Trenwith, P.M.; General Delivery Welland- 
port, Ontario; Age 66; Retired; Member of Duffer in Lodge 

No. 338, G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. George A. Campbell 
and Bro. Marvin B.R. Campbell. 

9. SILAGY, Thomas A., W.M. ; 40 Lakeshore Road, St. Catharines, 
Ontario, Age 52; Sales Manager; Member of St. George's Lodge 
No. 15, G.R.C; recommended by Bro. Marvin B.R. Campbell and 
W.Bro. George A. Campbell. 

10. SIMM, Frank Gordon, P.M.; 132 Kimberley Drive, Hamilton, 
Ontario; Age 49; Steelworker; Member of Electric Lodge No. 
4 95, G.R.C; recommended by V.W. Bro. C Laverne Dawdy and 
V.W. Bro. Joseph Hobson. 

11. WINTER, Roger Allen, M.M. ; City of Toronto, Ontario; Age 35; 
Transit Controller; Member of Prince of Wales Lodge No. 630, 
G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. George Blackie and R.W.Bro. 
Ronald E. Groshaw. 

12. BARNETT, James, M.M. ; R.R. #3, Waterford, Ontario; Age 45; 
Lecturer; Member Wilson Lodge No. 113, G.R.C; recommended 
by V.W. Bro. Randall D. Langs and R.W.Bro. Allan E. Broadley. 



13. STEER, John, M.M. ; 10 Hillcrest Ave. , Brantford, Ontario; 
Age 44; Machinist; Member of Onondaga Lodge No. 519, G.R.C; 
recommended by V.W. Bro. Randall D. Langs and W.Bro. H.W. 
Chivers. 

14. GREENAWAY, Thomas E. , P.D.D.G.M.; 15 First Ave., Brantford, 
Ontario; Age 83; Retired; Member of Reba Lodge No. 515, 
G.R.C; recommended by V.W. Bro. R.D. Langs and R.W.Bro. A.E. 
Broadley. 






- 7 - 



15. BURTON, Thomas Edward, P.M.; 156 Taylor Rd., Ancaster, 
Ontario; Age 59; Credit Manager; Member of Seymour Lodge 
No. 272, G.R.C.; recommended by V.W.Bro. C.L. Dawdy and 
V.W.Bro. J. Hobson. 

16. BOSTON, William James, M.M. ; 48 Allanbrooke Dr., Islington, 
Ontario; Age 62; Industrial Engineer; Member of Prince of 
Wales Lodge No. 630, G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. E.J. 
Brown and R. W.Bro. Wm. S. McVittie. 

17. ARMSTRONG, Henry Johnston, P.M.; 327 Runnymede Rd. , Toronto, 
Ontario; Age 75; Member of Prince of Wales Lodge No. 630, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. W.T. Boratynec and V.W.Bro. 
Kenneth Clark. 

18. BOLTON, William B., M.M. ; 1147 Minnetoka Rd. , Ottawa, Ontario; 
Age 57; Member of Prince of Wales Lodge No. 630, G.R.C.; 
recommended by M. W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey and R. W.Bro. C. Ross 
Thomson . 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R. W.Bro. Wallace McLeod, seconded 
by R. W.Bro. David Bradley, that the Applications be received and 
the usual Committees appointed. Carried. 

REPORTS OF STANDING AND APPOINTED COMMITTEES 

R. W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw, Chairman of the Transportation 
and Visitation Committee, complimented V.W.Bro. Pos, Editor of 
the Proceedings, for the long range planning and detail of coming 
events. This procedure was very useful for his Committee in 
arranging for any needed transportation. 

R. W.Bro. David Bradley, reported on behalf of W.Bro. Balfour 
LeGresley, Chairman of the Central Data Bank Committee. His report 
is reproduced as follows: 

Through the winter the Committee has been active with meet- 
ings in November 1978, January and March 1979. These have involved 
both planning and photographic sessions. The present activities 
directed toward the recording of current events in Masonry as 
the history of the future as well as seeking information on the 
memorabilia of the past. The photographic collection is growing 
steadily with about 120 - 35 mm colour slides in the files. We 
continue to solicit slides of any item of interest and encourage 
members to send photographs to extend the collection. We also 
urge that all members pass along information of items of interest 
that should be photographed or recorded. 

It is in the area of recording current activities in Masonry 
that we see an opportunity for The Heritage Lodge to provide both 
service and leadership. While preserving the activities of the 
present as the history of the future, films of current activities 
can be made available for showing in all Lodges, and thus The 
Heritage Lodge can make a valuable contribution to Masonic educa- 
tion. 

We wish to begin by creating a film documentary of the con- 
tribution of the Grand Master, M. W.Bro. Robert E. Davies, and 
outstanding events that have taken place in our jurisdiction during 
his term of office. The preparation for the 125th Anniversary 
Celebrations will be shown and the incoming Grand Master will be 



- 8 



introduced. The Grand Master is eager to proceed but his schedule 
has so far not permitted a planning-meeting to be held. The 
Heritage Lodge will be the producer and owner of the film and 
will rent it to Lodges so that all Masons can see what is happen- 
ing in the widest sphere of Masonry beyond the walls of their 
Lodges. 

The film will be made professionally by W.Bro. Jack Carpenter 
of Acton using a special type of 16 mm film cassette with sound 
track. The photographs will be made from 35 mm colour slides or 
any other photographs. The initial investment of $1,000.00 will 
be returned in rental fees. Several members of the Lodge have 
already volunteered to offer "risk capital" to the Lodge to 
finance the venture and we expect that many others will wish to 
share in this, particularly by supporting it with either a dona- 
tion or a loan. It is most important that The Heritage Lodge 
initiates such a venture at the earliest date if it is to win 
continued recognition throughout our Jurisdiction. If you can 
assist with financial support, please send a cheque to the Secre- 
tary of the Lodge, noting that the money is to be used in making 
the film. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R. W.Bro. David C. Bradley, seconded 
by V. W.Bro. Jack Pos, that the Report of the Central Data Bank 
Committee be adopted as read. Carried. 

R. W.Bro. Ed Ralph, Chairman of the Committee on Membership 
and Unattached Masons reported that his Committee was currently 
developing a type of information pamphlet giving the historical 
development of the Lodge and explaining its principal objectives. 
The lettering would be in Old English Style and also include an 
Application Form for Affiliation. 

R. W.Bro. Ed Wilson presented the Treasurer's Report which 
indicated that the Lodge was in sound financial condition. How- 
ever, if a more professional type of Lodge Proceedings are to be 
published then we shall have to increase our membership substan- 
tially, or increase the annual lodge fees. 

CAPITAL ACCOUNT 

Certificate = $5,000.00 
Bond = 1,000.00 
Bank = 881.52 
To deposit = _ 100.00 

$6,981.52 

OPERATING ACCOUNT 

Bank = $1,200.87 
To deposit = 180.00 

$1,380.87 

V. W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell, Chairman of the former Committee 
on Lodge Seal and Banner Committee was asked to stand and be 
recognized, not only for his leadership in the design and develop- 
ment of the Lodge Seal, and logo for Lodge stationery and forms, 
but also for his generous donation of a supply of 1,000 dues cards 



- 9 



to be issued to the members of the Lodge. 

The Secretary advised that this should keep the Lodge going 
for two or three years. The Worshipful Master, R.W.Bro. Keith 
Flynn, on behalf of The Heritage Lodge, thanked Bro. Thurtell. 
This was supported by the enthusiastic applause of the Brethren. 

V.W.Bro. Jack Pos, Chairman of the Committee on Masonic 
Museum, reported that the concept of acquiring the former resi- 
dence of the First Grand Master in the Town of Simcoe for a 
future Masonic Museum was still a feasible objective, but with 
the current high cost of Real Estate, this possibility would be 
deferred for the present. 

In the meantime, with some encouragement from the Grand 
Master, and on behalf of The Heritage Lodge, V.W.Bro. Pos has 
been exploring the possibility of re-creating in a suitable set- 
ting, a typical Masonic Lodge Room as it would have appeared over 
100 years ago. The proposal is similar to that illustrated in the 
1979, Colonel Sander's (Kentucky Fried Chicken) Calendar and 
Almanac. The coloured picture, which appears above the month of 
February, 1979, is a portion of the 60 acre historic prairie 
settlement called Heritage Park in Calgary, Alberta. The very 
prominent building with the green shingled upper storey, which is 
shown in the centre of the picture, features (on the lower floor) 
a bank as it may have appeared over 100 years ago and a Masonic 
Lodge on the upper floor. 

M.W.Bro. Davies has kindly supplied us with a number of 35 
mm coloured slides showing the distinguishing features of the 
interior of the Lodge Room. We might visualize a similar situation 
in a Museum Type Setting in Ontario. A couple of Pioneer Villages 
have been approached in Ontario and the idea has been warmly 
received. A voluntary roster could easily be organized to insure 
that a mason would be in attendance during the regular visiting 
hours throughout the year. Visiting masons could be presented 
with an honourary membership card. 

We have been informed of two Lodges in our Grand Jurisdiction, 
Aldworth Lodge No. 235, Paisley and Beach Lodge No. 639, Burling- 
ton, both of which have no further use of their furniture as they 
now share other facilities, and have placed their own in storage. 
The furniture of Aldworth Lodge is the original furniture and is 
over 100 years old. One Lodge has already been approached as to 
its possible aquisition, and the other will soon be approached. 
Perhaps each member of our Lodge could now be alert to our needs 
and advise us of any articles such as altars, chairs, benches, 
stands, desks, bibles, tools, lamps etc., that may be available 
for this purpose. 

Funds for the initial re-construction and subsequent mainten- 
ance are not readily available at the present time, but a combin- 
ation of financial support from the prospective occupants of the 
lower floor of such a proposed structure and ourselves using the 
upper floor, with possibly matching funds from the Ontario Heritage 
Foundation, Wintario or other funding agencies may be sufficient 
to initiate the project. 

Obviously, if the plan is to proceed, there will have to be 
considerably more cooperative planning required. Perhaps this 
could be our Lodge Project for the 125th Anniversary Celebrations 
for Grand Lodge in 1980. 

Several Committees did not report at this meeting. 



10 



GENERAL BUSINESS 

The Worshipful Master announced that V.W.Bro. J. Pos would 
receive all donations toward Project H.E.L.P. and would issue 
receipts for the same. 

With reference to the District Secretary's request for number 
of tickets required for the Grant Master's Banquet, it was decided 
that since all the Members were members of other Lodges, through 
which they would be obtaining tickets, none would be required by 
The Heritage Lodge. 

The Worshipful Master appointed R.W.Bro. John B. Hunter and 
W.Bro. R.H.W. Deacon, a committee of two with power to add, to 
look into the question of the best possible meeting night with 
the minimum number of conflicts, and within the constraints of 
available facilities. The report to be presented at the next 
Regular Meeting of the Lodge, May 16, 1979. 

MOTION RE: FRATERNAL VISITS 

With reference to the proposed fraternal visits, it was 
regularly moved by Bro. Rev. W. Gray Rivers, seconded by R.W.Bro. 
R.S. Throop that we accept the invitations to make a fraternal 
visit to: The Belleville Lodge No. 123, Belleville, Ontario on 
Thursday, June 7, 1979; Corinthian Lodge No. 101, Peterborough, 
Ontario on Saturday, September 22* 1979; and Wellington Lodge 
No. 635, Toronto, Ontario, on Friday, October 19, 1979. Carried. 

The Worshipful Master extended apologies for having made 
several appointments to Committees without having consulted with 
the individuals concerned. Nevertheless, he hoped that they would 
accept the responsibility and contribute to the work of the 
committee. 

INVESTITURE OF OFFICERS 

At this time, R.W.Bro. Ronald E. Groshaw was called on to 
invest those Officers who were unable to be in attenance at our 
Regular Installation and Investiture. Following the brief ceremony, 
R.W.Bro. Freer proclaimed: R.W.Bro. W.E.C. Wilson, Treasurer; 
R.W.Bro. D.C. Bradley, Inner Guard; and R.W.Bro. L.R. Hertel, 
Organist duly invested for the 1979 Masonic Year. 

BALLOTING 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Sparrow, seconded by R.W. 
Bro. McLeod, that the ballot be taken collectively. Carried. 

Following a favourable ballot on all applicants, the Worship- 
ful Master declared: R.W.Bro. John N. Plyley; W.Bro. Paul W.J. 
McNeil; and Bros. William Ross Tomkins, Harold G. Aggett, Charles 
Edward Basley, Frank G. Dyer, John Ross Jackson and Stanley Ray 
Westfall eligible for membership in The Heritage Lodge No. 730, 
by Affiliation. 

This being the Official Inspection of the District Deputy 
Grand Master, R.W.Bro. Burton S. Freer, the Lodge was opened in 
the Second and Third Degrees at 9:06 and 9:12 p.m., respectively 
and closed in the Third and Second Degrees at 9:15 and 9:18 p.m. 

Since The Heritage Lodge does not follow the normal custom 
of a formal banquet, the D.D.G.M., in speaking to the Brethren in 
the Lodge, chose for his text Exodus, Chapter 6 verse 8 " ... and 



- 11 



I will give it you for an heritage: I am the Lord". And in that 
land there was to be a Temple built. It was the inheritance of 
the promised land that kept the Israelites going; and so too, we 
in Masonry continually strive toward our objectives aided by the 
inheritance of our Landmarks. While some Grand Jurisdictions may 
have enumerated some 54 landmarks, there are essentially five 
of real significance: 

1. A mason professes belief in a Supreme Being. 

2. The Volume of The Sacred Law. 

3. He must be a man, freeborne of mature age. 

4. Allegiance to the Queen and Craft. 

5. Immortality of the soul. 

R.W.Bro. Freer concluded his remakrs with a well-chosen poem 
by Edgar Guest. 

The Worshipful Master, on behalf of the Lodge and the Visitor; 
thanked Bro. Freer for his kind words and sincere message. 

At this time, the Travelling Square and Compasses was pre- 
sented to the Worshipful Master to be passed on to Grand River 
Lodge No. 151, on Tuesday, April 10, 1979. 

PAPER PRESENTATION 

The Worshipful Master called on V.W.Bro. Pos to proceed with 
the work of the evening. 

V.W.Bro. Pos announced the procedure to be followed and then 
introduced W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe, who was born and raised on a 
farm, in Norwich Township, where he commenced his professional 
career with the Royal Bank at Burgessville in 1929. Except for 
military service in the Hitler War, he worked exclusively with 
the bank until his retirement at Kingston in 1971. He is a Fellow 
of the Institute of Canadian Bankers since 1936, and is presently 
a Case Councellor for the Federal Business Development Bank. 

Bro. Cohoe now has time to develop further an established 
interest in things, historical . He is a Charter Member, and Treas- 
urer of the Frontenac Historic Foundation which specializes in 
restoring buildings of historical or architectural interest. He 
is an active member of Heritage Canada and serves the Ontario 
Heritage Foundation in local projects. He is an active member 
and immediate past-president of the Kingston Historical Society, 
which is concerned with local history; he is currently treasurer 
of the Frontenac County History Committee project. 

W.Bro. Cohoe was initiated and continues his membership in 
North Bay Lodge No. 617. He affiliated with Queen's Lodge No. 
578, of which he is a past-Master. He joined the Scottish Rite 
in North Bay and completed all degrees with the Moore Sovereign 
Consistory in Hamilton. He then affiliated with Kingston Valley 
of Scottish Rite and is currently immediate past TPGM. He is a 
Charter Member and Officer of Ottawa Consistory, a member of 
Rameses Temple, Toronto and a correspondence member of Quator 
Coronati Lodge No. 2076, as well as Emulation Lodge of Improvement, 
London, England. 



- 12 - 

SOME EARLY MASONIC ACTIVITIES IN UPPER CANADA 

by 

W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe 



Certain masonic activity, noted by John Ross Robertson in 
his History of Freemasonry in Canada , has been copied many times. 
Later writers seem to depend almost entirely upon that source for 
their information. However, one is often left with a sense of 
masonic mythology, rather than concrete facts about real people. 
It is the purpose of this paper to flesh out some of the early 
masonic stories. They were strong, and self-reliant people who 
sacrificed, in many cases, very solid positions in their well 
developed communities along the Atlantic seaboard. Without such 
characteristics, they could not have come, with practically noth- 
ing, and set up a new society in a wilderness. There is no doubt 
that they were persons of strong will and action. Therefore, 
using additional source material, I shall attempt to supplement 
the meagre information about some early masonic activities in 
Ontario, then called Upper Canada. 

An unclaimed letter, advertised in the Kingston Gazette , 
July 14, 1818, was addressed to the Master, Boston Lodge No. 10. 
The entry never appears again in the list of unclaimed letters; 
so it can be assumed that the letter was immediately picked up. 
Who was this man? obviously someone knew he could be identified, 
and was anxious to make contact. Boston, Ontario, could not likely 
have been intended. (1) There was a great upheaval of lodges 
in the Boston, Massachusetts area about 17 81, when many prominent 
Bostonians were driven from their homes, or chose to take refuge 
in Canada. Some of these lodges withdrew to the protection of 
the British lines at New York. Some fled to Quebec. Some returned 
to American State jurisprudence, while others were erased. 
Washington Lodge No. 10, instituted in 1779, was under the juris- 
diction of Massachusetts. (2) During the disturbances, what 
happened to a lodge depended upon the individual master, and his 
officers. Their urgent need to survive was the motive for action. 
The background of the Boston Lodge letter is a mystery. Perhaps 
some day another researcher will pick up the thread, and add to 
it. In the meantime I urge every masonic historian to keep the 
Boston Lodge No. 10, in mind. Lodges formed in Quebec, in the 
period, demonstrate how quickly these changes developed. In 1762, 
six lodges were formed in Quebec, and then in 1781 to 1787, another 
five were instituted. (3) 

The first active lodge in Kingston, other than military lodges, 
seems to have been St. James' Lodge No. 14. It was petitioned 
for on May 12, 1781, and granted its warrant, October 10, the same 
year. (la) There are said to be no records of the lodge activi- 
ties, but, the petitioners, and officers, were such as to give us 
some idea of what may have taken place. It is reasonable to believe 
that they met in the old French Fort, known as Fort Frontenac. 
(lb) John Sellar, told his son Robert Sellar, that he attended 
lodge there when the fort was still habitable. Mathews (secretary 
to the Governor General) queried by John Stuart in 1784, about 
housing accommodation in Kingston, advised Stuart that Major Ross 
the commander, would provide housing for him in the fort. (Ila) 
A 1784 (?) map with key, describes barracks, tower and triangular 
building, constructed by the French, as operative. Another map, 
signed by Holland, the Surveyor-General, indicates barracks of 
French construction were in useable condition. He also reported 



- 13 



Fort Frontenac in better condition than he expected. (lib, lit) . 

Regular meetings of St. James 1 Lodge may have been difficult 
to plan, and arrange. At the time, 1783, the only people in the 
area were military personnel and administrative staff. The nine 
French fur traders had probably stayed after the evacuation. (He) 
The military were assigned strenuous duties. They included the 
exploration from the Bay of Quinte, eastward to Kingston, and 
inland from the lake shore to a depth of thirty miles. Others went 
north, up the Ottawa River to the site of that settlement, and 
then explored back to the lake front at Kingston. (lid) The problem 
was to find suitable land for the settlers expected the following 
spring of 17 84. Among these men were the officers of St. James' 
Lodge No. 14. John W. Meyers, in a return, or list of Loyalists 
by the Indian Department, appears as being at Niagara on December 
1, 1783. (4) Is it any wonder their meetings were held in 
irregular time, and form? 

Communication between the settlements was slow and uncertain. 
It depended upon the movement of the very few people in the country. 
Transportation was by self-propelled water routes, such as canoes, 
or by foot over forest paths. 

The original petitioners for the lodge were a diverse group. 
They had been brought together by the pressures of revolution in 
the American Colonies. It is doubtful if many of them knew each 
other before their arrival at St. John's, Quebec. They were soon 
scattered again by the demands of settlement, and that terrible 
urgency for survival. 

The Master of St. James 1 Lodge No. 14, in 1781, was Major 
James Rogers, aged 55. He had been born in New Hampshire, 
became involved in military command during the revolution, and 
held the command of the King's Rangers, by the time he arrived 
in Canada. He was the leader of the settlement in Fredericksburg 
Township, where he died in September 1790. (He) 

The Senior Warden of St. James' Lodge was John W. Meyers, 
a farmer, born in New York State, from near Albany, or Poughkeep- 
sie. He sacrificed a valuable estate to remain under the British 
Crown. Meyers was about 2 8 when he arrived in Kingston. Very 
shortly after, by 1787, he moved to Thurlow Township. Within a 
year he was well settled in Sydney Township, which borders Thurlow 
Township, and the present city of Belleville. We learn from a 
certificate of masonry that he was in Quebec in 1780. Meyers is 
described as a bold man, honest, but with limited education. In 
a military escapade against General Schuyler, it is said he learned 
that one of his men had stolen a silver cup. Meyers insisted 
that it be returned to the owner, their enemy. (5) Meyers proved 
to be an enterprising settler. He built the first mill between 
Napanee and Toronto (1790). He operated a sawmill, trading post, 
distillery, and a brick kiln. He built the first brick house in 
Upper Canada. He constructed boats. He was a justice of the 
peace, a captain of militia. (Hg, h) (6) In addition to this, 
as early as 1802, he found time to captain a boat carrying 130 
barrels of flour from Kingston to Montreal, for Richard Cartwright. 
(Ilg) Meyers was the first Master of Thurlow Lodge No. 17, and 
again in 1802. It later became Moira Lodge No. 17, and is now 
Moira Lodge No. 11, Belleville. (7) In 1817 he married again, 
this time it was Sophia Davy, resident of Ernestown. (8) A 
connection between the Davy Family and Addington Lodge will be 
developed later in this paper. It is evident throughout his life 
that Meyers was very much involved with masonic activities. In 
1815, either he, or his son of the same name, was Master of Moira 



- 14 



Lodge, and the following year a son George Meyers, was Master of 
that Lodge. 

The Junior Warden cf St. James 1 Lodge, William Buell, was 30 
years of age at the lodge's institution in 1781. In the announce- 
ment of his daughter's marriage, in 1808, he is described as the 
Master of St. James' Lodge No. 14. (Ie) However, I believe this 
should have read Past Master, because there is no reason to assume 
that St. James' Lodge operated after 1787. According to Robertson, 
a travelling Lodge No. 13 met at various places in Leeds County, 
and Buell was the Senior Warden of it when it was known as New 
Oswagatchie Lodge. This will be referred to again in the discus- 
sion of Addington Lodge, later in this paper. Buell is reported, 
also, to have attended Sussex Lodge No. 3, Brockville, on December 
22, and 27, 1817. (Ie) There is no doubt about this individual's 
life. He was a lieutenant in the King's Rangers, and settled in 
the Township of Elizabethtown. He built the first log house there 
and farmed 800 acres, 500 of which were situated in the present 
City of Brockville. (9) He served as a magistrate. As a sergeant 
in the militia, he drew a military pension for his lifetime. (10, 
11) A generous community citizen, he donated lots for a courthouse, 
for a jail, and for three churches. He also started the first 
school in the area, by setting aside one room in his house for 
classes. (9) He is commemorated by a street leading off from the 
main street of Brockville, which is named Buell Street (1978), 
One unmasonic note creeps into the situation, in the Brockville- 
Prescott Area of this story. The Buells, and the Joneses were 
not on perfectly friendly terms. The governing centre had been 
planned for Jones' area, in Augusta Township, just east of Prescott, 
but Buell, with his 500 acres in his town, stepped in with a dona- 
tion of land that brought the seat of government to Brockville. 
(If)" This quarrel was well known, and it explains why Brockville, 
originally named Elizabethtown, was also known as Snarlington. 
There are actually references in the newspaper, to the appointment 
of a roadmaster for Snarlington Road. No doubt General Brock was 
aware, when asked to name Elizabethtown, about the quarrelsome 
situation. Everyone was put in his place when he named the town 
after himself! Such animosity, as we all know is not conducive 
to a strong lodge, and may have something to do with transferring 
the number 13 to Addington Lodge, to be mentioned later in this 
paper. 

We have examined the principal officers of St. James' Lodge, 
James Rogers, William Buell and John Walter Meyers. The other 
five named in the original warrant would more than suffice to make 
it a perfect lodge. One of these, William Marsh, according to 
Robertson, went to Brockville. (Iq) However, although he drew land, 
he returned to Vermont. (Ilk) His son Mathias did stay in Canada. 
He went first to Adolphustown, where he had the first house. Later 
he went to Sydney, and this move would place him near Meyers. The 
Robertson information, that William Marsh settled in Brockville, 
is therefore likely incorrect. I have been unable to find any 
other reference to him. 

We now take up the trail of James Ferguson, one of the St. 
James' Lodge petitioners. He was about 25 years of age at the 
time. Ferguson was made an assistant commissary at Niagara, and 
by 1793 was authorized to allow payments for rent, in flour. 
Three years later we find him in Quebec, where he faced a court 



15 



martial for embezzlement, accused of giving certificates for 
flour, and peas which he had not received in his store. At that 
time he was referred to as the late commissary at Niagara. (Ill) 
James Ferguson is next heard of in Southwold, where it appears he 
was made a member of No.. 14 lodge there. Is this another case of 
those elusive travelling numbers? Did he transfer St. James 1 
Lodge No. 14 to Southwold? The lodge was warranted by Jarvis 
in 1799, and, in 1804, renamed Howard Lodge, after the secretary 
at the time. The last meeting of this lodge seems to have taken 
place in 1804, and it appeared to favour the schismatic Grand Lodge 
Of Niagara. (Ih, Urn) Ferguson, no doubt, could have influenced 
that allegiance as he had earlier been in Niagara, in a responsible 
post. Correpondence of Richard Cartwright, who cashed his quarterly 
pay drafts, when Ferguson was active in Niagara, shows his name 
spelled Fergueson. In other records he appears as Faerqueson. 
(12) Finally a James Ferguson died in Peterborough of apoplexy, 
on April 3, 1834, described as "an esteemed inhabitant of this 
village". (13) Why would the Kingston Chronicle & Gazette note a 
Peterborough death, unless the deceased had been from Kingston, or 
well known to people in that area? He was quite a young man when 
first in Kingston, and could have been well remembered by the 
older residents. 

The next petitioner for St. James' Lodge, named by Robertson, 
is Azariah Pritchard, whose given name Robertson spelled Ozariah. 
Although Pritchard deserves special attention, it will not be for 
masonic example, as you will see. He lived in Connecticut 1775-7, 
claiming to be active in the King's cause, but received many 
favours from the rebels because his father and brother were patriots 
In 1777 he was tried by a court martial at New Haven, for carrying 
intelligence into New York, but was acquitted as a result of bribes 
to the prosecutor. He escaped to Canada, and for four years acted 
as a guide to the British, on the Eastern part of Lake Champlain. 
He raised a company of King's Rangers, for which he was commis- 
sioned a captain. In 1782 he was involved in trading with the 
American enemy, in the Lake Champlain area. He was implicated in 
Counterfeit money transactions, and in issuing forged passes for 
American vessels. (Iln, 14) Pritchard was part of the Missisquoi 
malcontents at one point. (15) Official correspondence between 
Sherwood at St. John's, Quebec, and Mathews in Quebec City, 
about refugee settlers being "well inclined for Cataraiqui, 
except a number dictated by Captains Myers, Pritchard ... these 
have begun a settlement at Missisquoi Bay, and declare nothing 
but a superior force shall drive them off the land ...". (16) 
The reply to this correspondence recognizes "The difficulties of 
coming to market so much dwelt upon by the advocates for Missisquoi 
Bay", and, "Your account of the Missisquoi association exceeds 
anything that could be conceived". (Iln) Obviously, the British 
bureaucrats had a thing or two to learn, even from loyal people, 
about the effervescent political air of North America. Both 
Pritchard and Meyers were known as despatch carriers who always 
got through with their messages. That says something about them! 
Pritchard was later useful in obtaining reports for the Governor 
General, about the Missisquoi situation, of which he had originally 
been a part. A letter to the Governor General's secretary, by 
Pritchard, .shows me a man of meagre education, probably raised 
in an area where there was very little social contact with the 
outside world. There is an almost archaic construction to the 
language. He must have had a quick mind, and an ear for words, 
the precise meaning and spelling of which escaped him. Azariah 
Pritchard wrote: 



- 16 - 



"St. Johns 29th April 1784. 

Last evening I arrived at this place But out of health- 
and I would wish to informe you that I came to mishish 
"Yamachiche" I saw an advirtisement for signers to settle 
at Catarorkaway & the bay of Shelon (Chaleurs) and for 
missisque Bay-the incoureger for the Later theay wood not 
informe of-and at the same time thair was Heads of a 
Potision to His Excellency Setting Forth the unreasonable- 
ness of taking Land on the futting theay are to be given 
on-and that thair is a number of gentleman now in the 
Provance whoo offers to give Provision to any that Refuses 
to settle on the Land Either at Catarorkaway or the Bay 
of Shelon-and that they shall be supported till they can 
help themselves-and in the Potision it further says that 
theay was disarmd By His Excellency and som other throos 
that I do not remember-but for feair that I should be 
Sensured I kept clean of the Decorce (sic) but Recolecting 
since that I shoud Procuard a Coppey and sent it to Head 
Quaters-which I will as soon as possable and do my best to 
fiend out the Promoter which by a Little Courtship I think 
will be in my Power to fiend-I fiend it has Put a Stop to 
som that was goine with me to the bay-wirther I am Rite 
or Rong in Giving you the troble with this Letter. 
I am not serting but wood wish to be Rite." 

We can assume that where ritual was memorized he would do a 
fine job, even if the vocabulary exceeded his spelling ability. 
Pritchard appears on land Petitions for other people. (17) There 
are other consultations by Sherwood with Pritchard. (IIo) To 
accomplish what he did in the revolution he would have to have 
been a keen observer, and able to pass easily, in many groups Of 
people. He was listed as one of those who demanded far too much 
in land, and tools, promised by Carleton in New York, but labelled 
extravagant, by Haldimand in Quebec. (Ilq) Pritchard must have 
had some official mark against him, because he never received a 
grant of land. (18) This was most unusual for a commissioned 
officer. The last information is a list of promotions in which 
a Captain Pritchard becomes a major, by purchase, in the 49th 
Militia Regiment. (19) All other promotions listed, give the 
first name as well, but Pritchard is listed by his surname only. 
Since he would have been in his seventies, it may be another party. 
Although from his past exploits there is no reason to believe such 
an achievement beyond his capacity. 

Another member of the original petitioners for St. James' 
Lodge, was James Taylor. Robertson says he settled in Brockville. 
A James Taylor did sponsor Johnson children in Brockville, at 
christenings in 1822, and 1829. Letters were held at the Kingston 
post office for a James Taylor in 1818, 1826 and 1834. (20) A 
Captain James Taylor was appointed agent for Perth, of the United 
Empire Life Assurance Association in 1826. A Captain Taylor was 
present at a dinner in honour of William Morris in 1821. (21) A 
Colonel Taylor, as well as a William Morris were elected M.P.'s 
for Lanark in 1834. (22) Taylor's career is not easy to follow. 
Although not so striking a figure as some of his masonic brethren, 
he seems to have made a good citizen. 

Now we come to the last petitioner for St. James 1 Lodge. 
We will take up the life of two men, Lieutenant Solomon Johns 
and Lieutenant Solomon Jones. Lieutenant Solomon Johns seems to 
be the most likely candidate. He was sent in 1783 to explore the 
country from Kingston to the Bay of Quinte, and inland from the 
lake, extending back 30 miles. He was accompanied by Ensign Elijah 



- 17 



Bottum, about whom you will hear more. (Ilr) Robertson says 
Johns settled in Brockville, but every indication is that he 
settled in Ernestown. (la) A Solomon Johns, possibly a son, had 
an extensive career there in business, education and other local 
efforts. Johns Junior was closely connected with Henry Finkle, 
whom I shall mention with respect to Addington Lodge. The Senior 
Johns died, according to R.A. Preston, before June 24, 1790. 

I believe the former Solomon Johns senior was the petitioner 
to whom Robertson referred. However, a surgeon's mate Solomon 
Jones did settle in the Prescott area, and became a famous pioneer 
of that district. Certainly he was in the King's Service with 
the other military people whom we have mentioned. He obtained a 
substantial land grant. He was present at masonic affairs when 
William Buell attended. In the Jones* papers at Queen's University 
Archives is a letter dated March 9, 1799, addressed to Dr. Johns, 
by a William Fraser, wishing to build Dr. Jones' house, and refer- 
ring to his earlier conversation with Dr. Jones* brother, Captain 
Johns. There is no indication that Dr. Jones would not accept 
the Johns appelation. (23) Both Preston and Robertson admit that 
Jones and Johns are interchangeable. Dr. Jones did build his 
house in 1800/01, which has been preserved, and he continued as a 
leading citizen until his death in 1822. He may have been the 
petitioner to whom Robertson referred. He had come originally 
from Connecticut, was studying medicine in Albany, when he joined 
the Loyalists as a surgeon's mate, and despite the omission of 
his name from the first Medical Board in Upper Canada in 1819, 
was accepted in his community as a doctor of good reputation. (24) 

I have now covered the background of the eight petitioners 
for St. James' Lodge No. 14. Surely (other than military lodges 
which, of course, travel with their regiments) St. James' Lodge 
must have been the first lodge to operate in Kingston! The Master, 
James Rogers, did not live long, but the Senior Warden, John 
Meyers was also the first master of what became the first lodge 
in Belleville. William Buell, the Junior Warden, likely became 
the Master of No. 14, and was reported at Brockville, and other . 
eastern lodges. Such forceful men would have done lodge work when 
circumstances permitted. But travel, communication and the pres- 
sing need to survive, would interfere with regular meetings. The 
principal officers are known to have quickly moved out of the 
Kingston area, to settle their assigned lands. The year 1787 is 
known as the hungry year, and this could explain why No. 14 Lodge 
did not survive that year. (25) Crops failed. The British Govern- 
ment withdrew subsistence as planned, and the results were almost 
catastrophic, as people were reduced to starvation. In Kingston, 
the military, in order to sustain the civil population, were 
reduced to one biscuit a day. Is it any wonder St. James' Lodge 
ceased to work in Kingston that year? 

Before moving on to the next extinct lodge, I should like to 
mention one person who helps to fill out the picture of masonic 
activity. You will recall earlier, the name of Ensign Elijah 
Bottum, who accompanied Azariah Pritchard on his first scouting 
of the land for settlement, from the Bay of Quinte to Kingston in 
1783, before the settlers arrived the following Spring. Bottum 
was a farmer's son from Connecticut. After service in the King's 
Rangers, he settled in Augusta Township, where he had a distin- 
guished career. (26) He acted as executor of John and Solomon 
Jones' estates, was grand juror, subscribed to a very early church, 
(27 and was treasurer of New Oswagatchie Lodge No. 7. (Im) In a 
description of a welcome for Governor Simcoe and his wife, in 1792, 
"Captain Elijah Bottum, a large, and portly person, having at his 
side a formidable basket-kilted claymore, then addressed them in 



- 18 



brief military phrase, and gave one of the old war slogans". One 
can almost hear him declaiming ritual. For much of what we have 
to-day. we must thank the "Bottums". 

We now come to an important time in Frontenac District Masonry, 
although the District was not actually formed until many years 
later. In 1802 a petition, which included the name of Henry 
Finkle, was submitted for a lodge in Ernestown. It was to be 
named St. John's Lodge. (In) Two years later, in 1804, it was 
constituted as No. 13, and became known as Addington Lodge. 
Robertson hints that New Oswagatchie Lodge No. 13, may have been 
its predecessor. Is this a reference to a travelling lodge again? 
Henry Finkle of Ernestown is credited with building the first lodge 
hall. (Ip) As a ship builder he was quite capable of this. Robert- 
son says that the frame lodge was built about 1805, and later 
torn down to make way for a brick building. This does not agree 
with the newspaper reports of the time. Finkle had a house known 
as Finkle 1 s Tavern, (28) which could have served as an early lodge 
meeting place. Charles Young of Main Street, Bath, has been in 
it and expressed the opinion it would not serve as a lodge (1978) . 
It was burned during his lifetime. It seems natural that a tavern 
would be a gathering place, particularly in the earliest years 
when shelter of any kind was scarce. There was a second frame 
lodge in 1812. The Kingston Gazette carried an advertisement 
June 9, 1812, which reads, "Festival of St. John the Evangelist, 
and the dedication of the new masonic hall, will be celebrated by 
members of Addington Lodge No. 13, at the village of Ernest Town, 
on the 24th instant, when an oration will be delivered. The 
Brethren of neighbouring lodges are respectfully invited to attend. 
By order of the W.M. , M. Goodwin, Secty. Ernest Town, June 9, 
1812". (20) That settles the name, the number, and the fact of 
a new hall. This would seem to be the second hall, not the first. 
It was not torn down as Robertson reports, although an earlier one 
may have been demolished, because the Kingston Gazette of June 
9, 1821, notes, "On Monday afternoon the building occupied by the 
Freemason Lodge, in the village of Bath, was destroyed by fire, 
together with the most valuable articles belonging to the Society. 
We have not learnt in what way the fire originated." By 1811 
Ernestown was the most populous township in Upper Canada, with 
over 2,300 inhabitants. This is not the place to go into the 
great influence which the local lodge, and John Dean, had on 
the early attempts at forming a Grand Lodge. It was the centre 
of development, and what follows, no doubt was influenced by those 
who were carried away by expectations. Within a year Ernestown 
was renamed Bath. A two storey brick hall was erected in 1824, 
on the same location on Lodge Street, as the one destroyed by fire 
in 1821. Maple Leaf Lodge No. 119 has a P. A. cut stone which 
reads, "Addington Lodge No. 760, A. L. 5824". This stone appears 
in the brick facing, above the south door, of the first brick hall 
built for a lodge in Upper Canada. It can be seen in a sketch 
in Robertson's History of Freemasonry in Canada . But the circum- 
stances had changed. The economy of the Province was moving west- 
ward, and inward from the lake front. Napanee began to outpace 
Bath. Toronto was shortly to become the centre of rapid industrial 
growth. The young men were leaving to carve careers in the richer 
parts of the country. There was also the Morgan affair which, 
about 1826 had a serious effect on masonry. Attempts to complete 
the building, according to Robertson were numerous, but none were 
successful. Meetings reportedly held, and decisions to act all 
proved abortive. In 1829 the building was rented to the Methodists, 
who paid their rent by laying the flooring. In 1832 the building 
was sold to a member from whom the local Board of Health rented 
it during a cholera epidemic. The Methodists again took tenancy 
in 1834, at which time the upper floor was used as a school. The 



19 



building was used as a barrack for a while in 1837-8, during the 
Mackenzie Rebellion. By 1839 the Methodists were again using the 
ground floor, with a Mechanics' Institute on the second floor. 
I am indebted to Mary Davy, who wrote the History of the Methodist 
Church , for much of this information. Canniff, in his Settlement 
of Upper Canada , published in 1869, says that there were actual 
holes in the brickwork. The hall was obviously derelect. It was 
torn down in 1860. As Maple Leaf Lodge was instituted in 1859, 
and Addington Lodge was erased, as No. 493, in 1863, one is bound 
to conclude that there was a carry-over of membership between the 
two lodges. Lodge Street Bath has been shortened by the expansion 
of the Methodist Cemetery. Pieces of broken brick are still dug 
up in George Davy's garden where at least two old lodges stood. 
Addington Lodge, like St. James' Lodge has disappeared. The build- 
ings have gone, but we have the benefits of the labour of those 
early officers, and members of these vanished lodges. 

There is an underlying personal touch to several of these 
early lodges. No doubt the individuals' intentions were for the 
best, but without any Grand Lodge support, or its resultant cohesion, 
and in such unsettled conditions, their efforts deserve our respect, 
and admiration. 



Notes & Bibliography 



Notes 



Placenames: Sydney, Thurlow, Meyer's Creek, Belleville, 
New Oswagatchie, Prescott 
Snarlington, Elizabethtown, Brockville 
Ernest Town, Ernestown, Bath 
Cataraqui, Kingston 



Names 



Ferguson, Fergueson, Faerquerson 

Bottom, Bottum, Bothun, Bethune 

Johns, Johan, Jones 

John Waldenmeyer, John Walter Meyers, Mayers, Mierj 



With people speaking Dutch, German, Scotch, Irish, English and the 
American dialects derived from these origins, confusion in the 
names, and spelling is very evident. Official recorders who were 
themselves unsophisticated in language nuances, did little to 
assist the modern researcher in identifying people exactly. 

References 



I Robertson, John Ross, The History of Freemasonry in Canada , 



II 



volume one. 
















a 


p 264 












h 


p 731-2 


b 


p 178 












k 


p 269 


c 


p 267 












1 


p 582 


d 


p 264, 


27 










m 


p 292 


e 


p 1125 












n 


p 839 


f 


p 289 












o 


p 293 


g 


p 268 












P 


p 841 


Preston, 


Richard 
p 66 


A., 


Kings 


ton Before the 


War 


of 1812 


a 


g 


P 


218 




o 


p 68 


b 


p xli 




h 


P 


61 




P 


p 67 


c 


p xxxviii 


k 


P 


25, 


Fn 


q 


p xlix 


d 


p xliv 




1 


P 


106, 


Fn85 


r 


p 39 


e 


p 74, Fn 


m 


P 


106, 


Fn 


s 


p 39, Fn 








n 


P 


61-2 


, 64 


t 


p 89, 279 



- 20 - 

(1) Mika, Places in Ontario , p 235 

(2) Quator Coronati Transactions 1976, Volume 89, p 171 

(3) . Edited, History of Freemasonry and Concordant , Fraternity 

Publishing Company, London England, 1891, pp 200-1 

(4) Census of Niagara , 1783, Photostat British Museum 

(5) Canniff, W. , A History of the Settlement of Upper Canada , p 112 

(6) Mika, Places in Ontario , pp 171-4 

(7) History of Moira Lodge No. 11 , 1801-1976, H. S. Robbins 

(8) Kingston Gazette , July 15, 1817, p 3, col. 3 

(9) Mika, Places in Ontario , p 654 

(10) Pringle, J. F., Lunenburg, or The Old Eastern District , p 204 

(11) Kingston Gazette , October 26, 1816 

(12) Queen's University Archives, Cartwright Papers, Box 2, 

Letter Book 1, February 3, 1786 

(13) Kingston Chronicle & Gazette , May 10, 1834, p 3, col. 1 

(14) Ibid Q45.2, p 405; Q49, pp 52, 56, 70, 72, 79 

(15) P. A. C, Haldimand MSS, B137, pp 415, 434; pp 240, 258; 

B171-2, p 614 

(16) Ibid B162, p 190 

(17) Ibid B162, pp 270-1 

(18) Fryer, Mary Beacock, Loyalist Spy , p 245 

(19) Kingston Chronicle & Gazette , October 19, 1833, p 2 col. 4 

(20) Ibid 1818, 1826, 1833 

(21) Ibid May 21, 1821, p 3 col. 3 

(22) Ibid October 18, 1834, p 2 col. 3 

(23) Queen's University Archives, Jones Family Correspondence, 

II, 1791-9 

(24) Queen's University Archives, Jones Family Papers, offprint 

from Queen's Quarterly 

(25) CMRA. , No. 104, John E. Taylor, p 3 

(26) Mika Reprint, Pringle, J. F., Lunenburg, or the Old Eastern 

District , p 362 

(27) Queen's University Archives, Jones Family Papers, III Legal 

Documents, Files 36, 37 

(28) Mika, Places in Ontario , p 683 

(29) Kingston Gazette , June 9, and 16, 1812 

REVIEWS 

W. Bro. Cohoe's paper was reviewed by W.Bro. Greg C. Robinson, 
Bro. John E. Taylor, and M. W.Bro. Wn. K. Bailey. As none of the 
reviewers were able to be present, their written comments were 
presented by R. W.Bro. C.E. Drew, V. W.Bro. R.D. Langs and R. W.Bro. 
W.E. McLeod, respectively. 

REVIEW BY W.BRO. GREG C. ROBINSON 

W.Bro. Allan Cohoe is to be congratulated on his well docu- 
mented paper "Some Early Masonic Activities in Upper Canada". 
The Era covered is a difficult one to research, the Government 
Authorities were not as meticulous as they are now in the record- 
ing of vital statistics and other documents. Many records that did 
exist at one time have since been lost over the years. W.Bro. 
Cohoe's researches are therefore, of particular importance. 

The Author speculates that Boston Lodge No. 10, may have had 
its origin in Massachusetts; this would appear unlikely as Lodges 
from that State are not numbered. Perhaps the Lodge was of cland- 
estine origin, such as the Prince Hall Lodges. As the Author 
notes, the case is a mystery and is likely to remain so for some 
time. 



- 21 



An understatement is certainly made when the Author notes 
that the Morgan Affair of 1826, "Had a serious effect on Masonry" 
although the anti-masonic backlash, which followed, had only 
limited effect in Upper Canada, the Craft was devastated in many 
parts of the United States. Recovery was slow and painful. It 
is to be hoped that the Author will follow through with an additional 
sequel on this topic. 

REVIEW BY BRO. JOHN E. TAYLOR 

Worshipful Master, it is a pleasure and an honour to be 
invited to prepare a written review of the paper prepared by 
Brother Cohoe on "Some Early Masonic Activities in Upper Canada", 
and more especially to welcome a new writer in the field of masonic 
research. The reviewer has been one of the sole contributors in 
Canada since 1950, and there do not appear to have been many 
before that date. This is not the case in the Grand Lodge of 
England, where many Grand Lodge officers work at research, and the 
Grand Secretary himself is a prominent contributor, and a Past 
Master of Quatuor Coronati Lodge. 

Only two years ago when I happened to include Frontenac 
District in my duties of scrutineer ing at Grand Lodge, I then 
commented that this was one district where there was ample 
research material if only the brethren could be found to make the 
effort. 

Brother Cohoe begins with the first active lodge in Kingston, 
St. James No. 14, G.R.Q., E.R. 518, and has introduced the senior 
officers and described their civilian activities. Robertson states 
that there were no records left of this Lodge, and if it became 
inactive in 1787, as noted in this paper, where does the date come 
from. Captain J.W. Meyers was made a mason in St. Andrew's Lodge 
No. 2, Quebec, February 28, 1780. A copy of his Masonic certifi- 
cate has been preserved by his family and is reproduced in Robert- 
son's History, Vol. 1, p 268. The paper says that Meyers was the 
first Master of Thurlow Lodge No. 17. Where is the source of this 
item. Again, according to Robertson, Thurlow Lodge - a Jarvis 
Warrant - was formed in 1802. The paper says this was for the 
second time. When was the first? There is certainly no mention 
of Brother Meyers ever having been an officer of the Lodge, which 
is well covered by Robertson, and at a meeting held in June, 1812, 
he is shown as J.W. Brother Meyers was a lieutenant in the 1st 
Regiment of Hastings Militia in 1812, but resigned May 9, 1813. 
He was commissioned 5th September, 1807, and a footnote states 
that he served nineteen days ( Irving 's British Forces in Canada 
War of 1812-15). Re: Brother Buell, the author writes that he 
was a Past Master of St. James No. 14; what is more sure, is that 
he was a member of New Oswegachie Lodge No. 7, and was Master in 
1888. 

Brother Cohoe has collected a most welcome amount of local 
detail, and it is to be hoped that the paper will be a start of 
a venture into a most interesting field, and also that it will 
encourage Other masons to look round where they live and find 
worthy subjects. They do exist in the old areas of Ontario along 
the north shore of the Lake. Newspaper sources are invaluable but 
they do take time to cover; however, most old copies are now 
available on microfilm. 



22 



REVIEW BY M.W.BRO. WILLIAM K. BAILEY 

Bro. Allan Cohoe is to be highly commended for sorting out 
and placing into proper perspective on St. James Lodge No. 14 and 
Addington Lodge No. 13, much interesting and valuable information 
on Masonry in the frontier region of Frontenac around the end of 
the 17th century. 

In sketching the lives and time of the original petitioners 
of St. James Lodge No. 10, Bro. Cohoe has made these dedicated 
Masons come alive for us and shown how much these men treasured 
the teachings and fraternity to be found and enjoyed in Masonry. 
These early pioneers in Masonry were also leaders in the civil and 
military affairs on the frontiers of Upper Canada. 

It would be presumptuous of me to be critical of the facts 
presented by Bro. Cohoe in this paper since I do not have access 
to other than the History of Freemasonry in Canada by M.Wor.Bro. 
John R. Robertson and Masonic Records by John Lane published in 
1886. 

St. James Lodge does not appear as a warranted lodge on the 
records of the Grand Lodge until 1787 and as erased in 1813 which 
would be the time of the union of the two Grand Lodges of England. 

Addington Lodge does not appear as a warranted lodge on the 
records of the United Grand Lodge of England until 1822 and as 
erased in 1863. It would be interesting to learn why Addington 
Lodge, which undoubtedly owed allegiance to the Provincial Grand 
Lodge of Canada West headed by Sir Allan MacNab, did not participate 
in the union of this Grand Lodge with the new Grand Lodge of Canada 
in .1858. One can only conclude that there were differences of 
opinion among the brethren about remaining loyal to the mother Grand 
Lodge or seeking a warrant from the Grand Lodge of Canada. If 
the brethren had elected to become among the originals of the new 
Grand Lodge or at least among the affiliating lodges, the lodge 
would likely have been assigned a number among the first 10 early 
lodges in Canada West. 

As time did not permit a further informal discussion of 
this interesting paper, V.W.Bro. Pos then called on W.Bro. Cohoe 
to summarize the evening's presentations. 

SUMMARY BY W.BRO. ALLAN J. COHOE 

It is flattering to have my work critisized by such Masonic 
writers, and eminent brethren of the Craft. I am sincerely grate- 
ful for the trouble they have taken to ensure that my efforts 
should be better able to stand the tests of time. It is important 
for the reputation of our Heritage Lodge, and its status amongst 
research groups. While Bro. Taylor does not indicate it in his 
remarks, I am indebted to him for some technical corrections to my 
paper. He deserves the acknowledgement. 



Bro. Robinson's comment on the numbering of Massachusett 
Lodges does puzzle me. I wonder if he studied the Quator Coronati 
reference which I have listed as Number (2) in my bibliography, 
for the paper. My copy of the publication lists twelve lodges of 
America, ten bearing numbers, including "Washington Lodge No. 10, 
Massachusetts Line". He does not refute the source. 






23 



Perhaps the reference No. (24), on the cessation of St. 
James' Lodge No. 14, in 17 87, was too abbreviated for Bro. Taylor, 
but it is an article by Bro. Taylor himself, dating the demise of 
that lodge as 1787, which was carried in volume 104, of the Canadian 
Masonic Research Association . My faith in Bro. Taylor's capacity 
in this field, led me to accept his date because I could not 
locate another. 

With reference to his question as to the formation of Thurlow 
Lodge prior to the date given by Robertson, I refer him to my 
reference numbered (5) , the History of Moira Lodge No. 11 . The 
author, H. S. Robbins, spent two years researching for this booklet, 
and a Belleville friend of mine assures me Bro. Robbins is very 
thorough. According to this history, John Walden Meyers was 
master in 1801, and again in 1802, then in 1815 a J. W. Meyers was 
master again. The latter master could have been a son of the same 
name whom my researches disclosed. I cannot be positive whether 
the last named is the father or the son. 

With respect to William Buell's mastership, the newspaper 
wedding announcement calls him the master of St. James' Lodge No. 
14, long after the lodge had ceased to exist. In true Masonic 
custom, I have, on my own authority, granted him a past mastership. 
I may be wrong. 

Most Worshipful Bro. Bailey's balanced comments delivered by 
R.W. Bro. McLeod, with the other criticisms have been stimulating. 
This encourages me to pursue my researches. I would appeal to 
those who have never done anything of this sort to start investigat- 
ing their local records for information to fill out the regular 
lodge records. Early newspapers sometimes gave much space to our 
Craft. 

W.Bro. Cohoe illustrated his presentation with a number of 
well-selected coloured slides. An interesting exhibit was also 
presented to permit the brethren to see photographs and documents 
from the archives, as well as portions of the original bricks of 
Addington Lodge and St. James' Lodge, which are still being unearthed 
in George Davy's garden. 



COMING EVENTS 

MAY 3, 1979, (Thursday) - The 18th Century Degree Cast will be 

visiting St. Clair Lodge No. 135, to dramatize a typical 
18th Century Lodge Meeting and Initiation Ceremony, in 
their Lodge Meeting Place in Milton, Ontario. 

MAY ll-12th, 1979, (Friday & Saturday) - The Third Regional Masonic 
Workshop will take place at the University of Guelph, 
Guelph, Ontario. The complete program is outlined on page 
25. 

MAY 16, 197 9, (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 
M. W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey will present a paper titled 
"Historical Review of The Constitution of Grand Lodge". 

JUNE 7, 1979, (Thursday) - The Heritage Lodge will make a fraternal 
visit to The Belleville Lodge No. 123, Belleville, 
Ontario, to present a Masonic Paper dealing with The 
Influence of United Empire Loyalists on the Early Develop- 
ment of Prince Edward District. 



- 24 



JULY 18-19th, 1979 (Wednesday & Thursday) - The 124th Annual 

Communication of Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada In 
the Province of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario. 

SEPTEMBER 19, 1979, (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage 
Lodge. Annual Election of Officers. Also, R.W.Bro. 
Wallace E. McLeod will present a paper titled "John 
Coustos - The Lisbon Inquisition". 

SEPTEMBER 22, 1979, (Saturday) - The Heritage Lodge will make a 

Fraternal Visit to Corinthian Lodge No. 101, to partic- 
ipate in their Saturday Program and present a "Masonic 
History" the subject title was left open. 

OCTOBER 19, 1979, (Friday) - The 18th Century Degree Cast will be 
visiting St. Clair Lodge No. 135, to dramatize a typical 
18th Century Lodge Meeting and Initiation Ceremony, in 
their Lodge Meeting Place in Milton, Ontario. 

NOVEMBER 21, 1979, (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage 
Lodge. This is the Annual Installation and Investiture 
of the Worshipful Master and the Officers of the Lodge. 
Also at this meeting, W.Bro. Greg C. Robinson will 
present a paper titled "Morgan - The Canadian Connection" 

MARCH 18, 1980, (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage 

Lodge. R.W.Bro. Charles A. Sankey will present a paper 
which will be a condensation of Albert Pike's Papers on 
the First Three Degrees of Masonry. The correct title 
has yet to be decided. 

MAY 21, 1980, (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 
Bro. John E. Taylor, the first Mason to receive the 
coveted William Mercer Wilson Medal for his academic 
contributions to Masonic Research, will present a paper 
titled "The Lodge Room, Lodge Furniture, Regalia and 
other Masonic matters. 

Other Historical Masonic Papers to be scheduled for future 
meetings include; 

1. Quasi Masonic Bodies, not recognized by Grand Lodge; for 
example: Chinese Masons, Red Cross of Rome and Constan- 
tine, Rosicrucians, Prince Hall Masons etc. 

2. Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario - Lodges 
formerly on the Register and now struck off, by Bro. J. E. 
Taylor. 

3. A review of the important similarities of our Grand Masters 

4. Women Freemasons in Ontario. 



5. The Masonic Career of Captain Joseph Brant - Mohawk 
Indian Chief by V. W.Bro. J. Pos. 



25 



THIRD REGIONAL MASONIC WORKSHOP 

UNIVERSITY OP GUELPH 
Guelph, Ontario 

May ll-12th, 1979 

Theme Title - "Beyond The Apron" 

FRIDAY NIGHT BANQUET PROGRAM 

1830 - Registration, fellowship and cash bar. 

1915 - Banquet, Head Table with 10 person round tables. 

2030 - Introduce Head Table, V.W.Bro. Randall Langs, M.C. 

2040 - Welcome, R.W.Bro. Gary Powell, D.D.G.M. Wellington Dist. 

2050 - Toast to Grand Lodge, W.Bro. Peter C. Diebel 

2055 - Response, R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards, Deputy Grand Master. 

2100 - Introduce Speaker, V.W.Bro. Jacob (Jack) Pos 

2105 - Keynote Speaker, R.W.Bro. Allen E. Roberts, Highland Springs, 

Virginia. 
2150 - Thank Speaker, R.W.Bro. W.E. Wilson 

2155 - Announcements for Saturday Program, V.W.Bro. Ted Bodman 
2200 - Late Registrations, 

- Adjourn, informal discussions and fellowship 



SATURDAY PROGRAM 

Registration, second floor Arts Building. 

Discussion Session No. 1, Topics - 1,2,3,4,6,7 & 8. 

Morning Break, (refreshments) . 

Discussion Session No. 2, Topics - 1,2,3,4,5,6 & 7. 

Lunch, Delegates are on their own. 

Discussion Session No. 3, Topics - 1,2,3,5,7,8 & 9. 

Afternoon Break, (refreshments) . 

Discussion Session No. 4, Topics - 4,5,6,7,8 & 9. 



0800 
0845 

ioio 

1035 
1200 
1325 
1450 
1515 
1640 - Adjourn 



DISCUSSION TOPICS 
(Each Delegate will be able to participate in 4 of the 9 topics) 

1. MASONIC LITERATURE - Establishing your personal library. 

2. REVELATIONS - Planning the future for Freemasonry. 

3. COMMUNICATIONS - Applying new aduio-visual concepts to 

Freemasonry. 

4. LODGE HISTORIANS - Learning about a new Lodge Office. 

5. OUR 125TH ANNIVERSARY - Suggesting individual Lodge Topics. 

6. THE CHALLENGE OF FREEMASONRY - Keeping our Members interested 

7. OTHER MASONIC BODIES - Reacting on Craft Lodges. 

8. INTEREST BUILDERS - Reaching out to the Lodges, programs for 

non-masons and our ladies. 

9. LEADERSHIP - Preparing for office, lodge management, and the 

role of Lodge Secretaries. 



This promises to be another outstanding experience in masonic 
outreach "Beyond the Apron", everyone will want to share in this 
challenging program. Costs are being determined, and Registration 
Forms will soon be available from R.W.Bro. Wm. S. McVittie, 50 
Renwick St., Cambridge (H) , Ontario, N3C 2T7; Phone 519-658-2334. 



- 26 - 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 
1978 - 1979 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M.W.Bro. Robert E. Davies 
P.O. Box- 370, Mount Forest, NOG 2L0 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 
R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards 
59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2H4 

GRAND SECRETARY 

M.W.Bro. J. A. Irvine 

Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R.W.Bro. Burton S. Freer 

R.R. No. 6, Cambridge (Gait), NlR 5S7 







LODGE 


OFFICERS 








1979 




W.M. 


R.W.Bro. 


Keith R.A. Flynn 


J.S. 


V.W.Bro. 


P.M. 


V.W.Bro. 


Jacob Pos 


Tyler 


R.W.Bro. 


S.W. 


R.W.Bro. 


Donald S. Grinton 


Sec'y 


W.Bro. 


J.W. 


R.W.Bro. 


Ronald E. Groshaw 


A/Sec ' y 


W.Bro. 


S.D. 


W.Bro. 


George E. Zwicker 


Treas. 


R.W.Bro. 


J.D. 


W.Bro. 


Balfour LeGresley 


D.C. 


R.W.Bro. 


I.B. 


R.W.Bro. 


David C. Bradley 


Chap. 


Bro. 


S.S. 


R.W.Bro. 


Charles Edwin Drew 


Organist 


R.W.Bro. 



Robert Carpenter 
Wm. S. McVittie 
James A. Faulkner 
Joseph J. Vliehs 
W.E. Wilson 
Roy S. Sparrow 
Rev. W.G. Rivers 
L.R. Hertel 



COMMITTEES FOR 1979 



GENERAL PURPOSE - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, (S.W.) ; all 
Chairmen of Lodge Committees; Officers and Past Masters. 

VISITATION & TRANSPORTATION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw, 
(J.W. ); W.Bro. George Zwicker, (S.D.); and W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 

MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph; W. 
Bro. George Zwicker, (S.D.); V.W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell; W.Bro. Bert 
Mennie; and Bro. Robert Throop. 

REFRESHMENT & ENTERTAINMENT - Chairman, R.W.Bro. C.E. Drew, (S.S.); 
V.W.Bro. Robert Carpenter, (J.S.); and locally, Co-Chairman, W.Bro. 
Donald Kaufman; Bro, John Jones and Bro. Richard Zimmerman. 

RECEPTION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow, (D.C); R.W.Bro. Wm. S. 
McVittie, (Tyler); and R.W.Bro. Charles Grimwood. 

MASONIC INFORMATION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Gary Powell; R.W.Bro. Frank 
Bruce; and V.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - Chairman, V.W.Bro. Jack Pos; R.W.Bro. Wallace McLeod; 
and R.W.Bro. John Woodburn. 

CENTRAL DATA BANK - Chairman, W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley; R.W.Bro. 
Frank Bruce; R.W.Bro. James Gerrard; R.W.Bro. David Bradley; R.W.Bro. 
Ronald Groshaw; V.W.Bro. Jack Pos; W.Bro. Paul Engel; and Bro. Kenneth 
Bartlett. 



Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers; R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow; 



David Bradley; R.W.Bro. Edsel 



LODGE LIBRARY - Chairman, 
W.Bro. Donald Kaufman. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro 
Steen; R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey. 

DUTIES OF COMMITTEES 

The duties of all Lodge Committees are defined in the Lodge By- 
Laws, see Article VIII, Sections 1 to 11. PLEASE NOTE: Immediately 
following their appointment and at their earliest convenience, all 
Committees shall prepare a budget for the coming year. These budgets 
shall be submitted to the Lodge Secretary before the next General 
Purpose Committee Meeting of the Lodge. 



Zi)t heritage lobge J&0.730 

INSTITUTEDi September 21, 1977 - CONSTITUTED* September 23, 1978 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple 

The formation of this unique Lodge marks the establishment 
of a common forum for all interested masons who have a real concern 
for preserving the past and influencing the future development of 
Freemasonry. The purpose and objectives of the Lodge have been 
delineated in the By-Laws and offer a seven point program to provide 
challenging opportunities to encourage participation in scholarly 
research, and a variety of other interesting subjects designed to 
encourage masonc and lodges to take an active interest in the 
preservation of our Masonic Heritage. 

Application for Affiliation 

To the Worshipful Master, Wardens and Brethren of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730, of the Grand Lodge of A.F.& A.M. of Canada, in the 
Province of Ontario. 



' (Print 'name 'ln'fulij " ' ' (Address) 



° f •Uo^-ir-City! tfid45 Ph ° ne ( > 

in the County of ...» and , 

(County) (Province) 

Occupati on , date of birth , 

being a .Mason, and desirous of becoming a member 

(Masonic Rank) 
of The Heritage Lodge No. 730, do declare as follows i 

I -un not in debt to any Lodge for dues or otherwise. 



I wis Initiated . ,*.,.«.., Passed & Raised in 
(Date) 



Lodge No. ...... at , under the juris- 
diction of the Grand Lodge of and am in good 

Masonic standing. I was last a member of Lodge No. . , 

Dated at this day of 19. 

Signature ir full ■ 

Recommended b> i 1 

2 

The Lodge meets on the third Wednesday of Sept. , Nov. , March and May, 

Affiliation Fee $10.00 

Annual Dues (Sept. 1 - Aug. 31), ... 10.00 

Total $ 20.00 

Return Application toi The Heritage Lodge No. 730 

10 Mayfield Avenue, 
Guelph, Ont., NIG 2L8 (519) 821-^995 



Proceedings 

H\>t heritage Hohqt JSo.730 
ajf.&a.iw.. <a*.c. 



INSTITUTED 
Sept. 21, 1977 



Keith R.A. Flynn, W.M. 
P.O.Box 119. Main St., 
Atwood, Ontario, 
NOG 1BO 



(519) 356-2845 




CONSTITUTED 
Sept. 23, 1978 

J. Pos, Editor 
10 Mayfield Ave. 
Guelph, Ontario, 
NIG 2L8 

(519) 821-4995 



Vol. 02, No. 06 



Cambridge, Ontario, Canada 



September, 1979 



This Bulletin includes the Summons for the next Regular Meeting, 
Proceedings of the Ninth Regular Communication held on Wednesday, 
May 16th, 1979, report of the Fraternal Visit to The Belleville 
Lodge No. 123, Belleville, Ontario on Thursday, June 7th, 1979, and 
the announcements for several coming events. 

Please note that the opinions expressed by respective authors in 
these Proceedings are not necessarily those of the Lodge or its member: 



SUMMONS 



Dear Sirs and Brethren: 



By direction from the Worshipful Master you are hereby requested 
to attend the Tenth Regular Communication of the Lodge to be held in 
the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple at the North-East corner of the 
intersection of Highways No. 401 & 24 on, 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, SEPTEMBER 19th, 1979, at 7:30 p.m. 

prompt for the purpose of the Annual Election of Officers .and the 
introduction and transaction of such business as may be regularly 
brought before the Lodge. 

We will be pleased to welcome, on this occassion, R.W.Bro. 
Wallace E. McLeod, a Charter Member of our Lodge, who will present 
a paper titled "John Coustos - The Lisbon Inquisition". Written 
reviews of R.W.Bro. McLeods paper will also be presented. Bring 
along a masonic friend and join in the open discussion which follows 
the formal presentations. 

GENERAL PURPOSE COMMITTEE 

The General Purpose Committee Meeting will be held on, 
WEDNESDAY EVENING, AUGUST 29th, at 7:30 p.m. 

All Lodge Officers and Chairmen of Standing and Appointed 
Committees are urgently requested to attend. All members are partic- 
ularly welcome. 

Fraternally yours, 



W.Bro. James A. Faulkner, 
Secretary. 



i 



2 - 



The Ninth Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge No. 730 was 
held in the Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple, Cambridge, Wednesday, 
May 16, 1979 with 13 Officers, 24 Members and 10 Visitors for a 
total of 47 Masons as per Lodge Register. 

OPEN THE LODGE 

The Lodge was opened in the First Degree at 7:42 p.m. Worship- 
ful Master, R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn welcomed the Brethren and then 
called on Bro.Rev. Gray Rivers. 

AT THE ALTAR 

The Lodge Chaplain Bro. Rev. Gray Rivers, approached the altar 
for the reading and prayer. 

BRETHREN: As we contemplate this evening the early efforts to 
develop a Book of Constitution for our Grand Lodge we recall that 
the first five Books in The Volume of the Sacred Law depict the 
struggle of our Judeo - Christian forefathers to establish some sort 
of "Social Order" - or "constitution for community living". Sim- 
ilarly in the effort to organize the early Christians into a "Church" 
St. Paul says (1 Corinthians 14:40): "So, my brethren all things 
shall be done decently and in order". This, then, is the primary 
purpose and function of any Constitution. 

LET US PRAY 

Almighty God, the glorious Architect and Ruler of the Universe, 
make us ever sensitive to the rules of conduct laid down in Thy Most 
Holy Word, that in our daily lives as Masons, as well as in the 
structuring, administering, and ceremonial observances of our beloved 
Fraternity we shall be so directed that all things shall be done 
decently and in order, to the honour and glory of Thy Holy Name. Amen. 

So Mote It Be. 

APOLOGIES 

Apologies were received by telephone from R.W.Bros. Ron Groshaw, 
Ed Ralph and Wallace McLeod; and by correspondence from R.W.Bros. 
Jim Gerrard and Frank Bruce and Bro. Marvin Campbell. 

MINUTES 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Don Grinton, seconded by 
W.Bro. George Z wicker, that the minutes of the Eighth Regular 
Meeting, held on Wednesday, March 21, 1979, be adopted as circulated 
in the Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 2, No. 5, May, 1979. Carried. 

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES ON PETITIONS 

With the exception of the Committees Appointed to Report on 
Arthur Albert Baxter, Dorian Arthur Baxter and Glenson Trevelyn 
Jones, who had not submitted their reports by this date, the reports 
of the remaining Committees on the 15 Petitions for Affiliation as 
appearing on pages 5-7 of the Lodge Proceedings, Vol. 2, No. 5, 
May, 1979, all reported favourable. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by V. W.Bro. Randall Langs, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. Charles Drew, that the Reports be accepted, the Committees 
be discharged with the thanks of the Lodge, and the Applications 
illoted upon. Carried. 



CORRESPONDENCE 

A letter was received from M.W.Bro. J. A. Irvine, Grand 
Secretary enclosing: 

1. Notice of Motion 

2. Grand Lodge Nominations for 1979 

3. Proxy form for Grand Lodge 

4. A draft copy of the proposed new Constitution to Grand Lodge, 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by W.Bro. George Zwicker, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. David Bradley that the Correspondence be received and the 
necessary action taken. Carried. 

PASSING ACCOUNTS 

The following accounts, amounting to $295.22 were presented and 
on a motion by W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, seconded by W.Bro. George 
Zwicker were passed and ordered paid: Carried. 

Secretary's Account: 

Postage $35.79 

Stationery 2.25 $ 38.04 

Mrs. Ross Perry; Fergus: 

Typing March Proceedings 

(26 pages) 26.00 

Kopy Print, Guelph: 

Publishing March Proceedings 142.24 

Guelph Printing Service Ltd. , 
Guelph: 

1000 Brown Kraft Envelopes 66.86 

Bro. John Jones; Cambridge: 

May refreshments 22 . 08 

TOTAL $295.22 

RECEIVING PETITIONS FOR AFFILIATION 

Applications for Affiliation were received from the following: 

1. CRAIG, William Hardy, M.M. ; 1722 Finch Ave., Pickering, Ontario; 
Age 58; Consulting Engineer; Member of Doric Lodge No. 424, 
G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. David Bradley and R.W.Bro. Ed 
Wilson. 

2. CROWLEY, Thomas E. , P.M.; 3120 Randolph St., Windsor, Ontario; 
Age 48; Newspaperman, Member of Palace Lodge No. 604, G.R.C.; 
recommended by Bro. James Hayes and V. W.Bro. Jack Pos . 

3. DUNN, Frank G. P.M.; 2134 Greenhurst Ave., Mississauga, Ontario; 
Age 51; Self -Employed; Member of Lake Shore Lodge No. 645, G.R.C. 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Ed Wilson and V. W.Bro. Robert McMaster. 

4. FERRY, Brian, W.M. ; 588 Vermouth Ave., Mississauga, Ontario; 
Age 51; Stockkeeper; Member of Lake Shore Lodge No. 645, G.R.C; 
recommended by W.Bro. W. T. Boratynec and R.W.Bro. J.W. Gerrard. 

5. GARDNER, D. Neil, P.M.; 56 Wareside Rd., Etobicoke, Ontario; 
Age 49; Teacher; Member of River Park Lodge No. 356, G.R.C; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. J.W. Gerrard and W.Bro. E.J.B. Anderson. 



- 4 



6. GEGENSCHATZ, Frederick D. , M.M. ; 54 Armsdale Ave., Toronto, 
Ontario; Age 35; Manager; Member of Temple Lodge No. 525, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. W.T. Boratynec and R.W.Bro. J.W. 
Gerrard. 

7. GRANT, Alexander, M.M. ; 1546 Carletta Dr., Mississauga, Ontario; 
Age 55; Senior Labour Relations Officer; Member of Joseph A. 
Hearn Lodge No. 685, G.R.C.; recommended by R.W.Bro. J.W. 
Gerrard and W.Bro. E.J.B. Anderson. 

8. KEMP, Joseph, P.G.E.; 23 Kinghorn Ave., Toronto, Ontario; 
Age 68; Retired; Member of King Hiram Lodge No. 566, G.R.C.; 
recommended by W.Bro. W.T. Boratynec and R.W.Bro. J.W. Gerrard. 

9. LINTER, Arthur Clarence, M.M.; 14 Halton St., Toronto, Ontario; 
Age 63; Control Clerk; Member of Prince of Wales Lodge No. 630, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. W.T. Boratynec and V. W.Bro. 
Kenneth H. Clark. 

10. MCCANDLESS, Howard, M.M. ; 245 Bartley Bull Parkway, Brampton, 
Ontario; Age 37; Teacher; Member of Ionic Lodge No. 229, G.R.C; 
recommended by W.Bro. W.T. Boratynec and R.W.Bro. J. W. Gerrard. 

11. MCTAVISH, Robert Laughlin, P.G.S.; 7 Rangoon Rd., Etobicok, 
Ontario; Age 50; Technician, Ontario Hydro; Member of Stanley 
Lodge No. 426, G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. W.T. Boratynec 
and R.W.Bro. J.W. Gerrard. 

12. MAYDAN, Peter, I. P.M.; 81 Baby Point Rd. , Toronto, Ontario; 
Age 63; Retired; Member of The General Mercer Lodge No. 548, 
G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. W.T. Boratynec and R.W.Bro. 
J.W. Gerrard. 

13. MEDHURST, Arthur Reginald, P.M.; 287 Markland Dr., Apt. 812, 
Etobicok, Ontario; Age 60; Retired Teacher; Member of Long 
Branch Lodge No. 632, G.R.C; recommended by R.W.Bro. J.W. 
Gerrard and W.Bro. E.J.B. Anderson. 

14. MOFFATT, Percy, W.M. ; 942 Masson St., Oshawa, Ontario; Age 57; 
Steam Fitter; Member of Cedar Lodge No. 270, G.R.C; recommended 
by W.Bro. William H. Perryman and R.W.Bro. W. Gordon Bunker. 

15. PARK, Peter David, M.M. ; 55 Mercury Rd. , Rexdale, Ontario; 
Age 52; Probation/Parole Officer; Member of Kilwinning Lodge 
No. 565, G.R.C; recommended by W.Bro. W.T. Boratynec and 
R.W.Bro. J. W. Gerrard. 

16. STRUTT, William Allan, P.D.D.G.M.; 955-9th Ave. W. , Owen Sound, 
Ontario; Age 61; Accountant; Member of North Star Lodge No. 322, 
G.R.C.; recommended by W.Bro. Joseph Vliehs and R.W.Bro. Wm. S. 
McVittie. 

17. THORNTON, Donald John, M.M. ; 7 Norval Cresc. , Brampton, Ontario; 
Age 45; Civil Engineer; Member of Ionic Lodge No. 229, G.R.C; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. J.W. Gerrard and W.Bro. E.J.B. Anderson. 

18. TROSCOTT, William Earl, P.G.S.; 2886 Riviera Dr., Windsor, 
Ontario; Age 61; Sales Managers; Member of Great Western Lodge 
No. 47, G.R.C; recommended by Bro. James N. Hayes and V. W.Bro. 
Jack Pos. 



19. WATSON, Aruthur Wellington, P.G.C.; 404 Mount Albion Rd., 
Hamilton, Ontario; Age 56; Clergyman; Member of Doric Lodge 
No. 382, G.R.C.; recommended by V.W.Bro. Laverne Dawdy and 
V.W.Bro. Jack Pos. 

20. WOLFE, Henry C, W.M. ; 34 Princess St. E. , Waterloo, Ontario; 
Age 56; Retired; Member of Glenrose Lodge No. 628, G.R.C.; 
recommended by R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn and R.W.Bro. N.R. Richards. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Robert Throop, seconded by 
R.W.Bro. David Bradley, that the Applications be received and the 
usual Committees appointed. Carried. 

Another Petition had been received, but since the applicant 
resided outside the Grand Lodge Jurisdiction, V.W.Bro. Pos, Lodge 
Secretary, indicated that it would be brought up under General 
Business. 

REPORTS OF STANDING AND APPOINTED COMMITTEES 

The Worshipful Master called on R.W.Bro. Grinton to summarize 
the Reports of Committees as presented at the last General Purpose 
Committee Meeting held on Wednesday, April 18th, 1979, at the 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple: 

VISITATION & TRANSPORTATION - In the absence of a formal report, 
it was agreed that, in view of the various locations of the resi- 
dences of the members of the Lodge, small groups of masons from the 
various areas in the Province should pool their resources and travel 
by private car to the following fraternal visits: 

June 7, 1979, to The Belleville Lodge No. 123, G.R.C.; 
Belleville, Ontario. 

September 22, 1979, to Corithian Lodge No. 101, G.R.C.; 

Peterborough, Ontario. (This meeting has been subsequently cancelled! 

All officers are expected to attend, and other members are 
encouraged to participate. 

MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS - 

A request had been received from R.W.Bro. Ed Ralph asking for 
permission to proceed with the design of a Pamphlet giving a brief 
history and objectives of the Lodge and to include an application 
form for affiliation. The Committee authorized R.W.Bro. Ralph to 
proceed with the design and present a proposal at the next General 
Purpose Committee Meeting to be held on Wednesday, August 29, 1979. 

MASONIC INFORMATION - 

V.W.Bro. Pos reported on behalf of the Chairman of the Commit- 
tee, and stated that R.W.Bro. Gary Powell had suggested that perhaps 
it would be better for the Lodge if a new Chairman could be appointed, 
as his duties throughout the District had prevented him from partic- 
ipating fully in that capacity. 

The Committee left this in the hands of the Worshipful Master 
suggested that he may wish to approach R.W.Bro. Frank Bruce. 



- 6 



CENTRAL DATA BANK - 

W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, Chairman of the Committee, reminded 
the Brethren of his previous report, and enlarged upon the original 
proposal by stating that V. W.Bro. Pos had met with the Grand 
Master and that 12 important highlights of the Grand Master's 
Masonic Career had been identified as the basic structure to permit 
W.Bro. Jack Carpenter to develop a rough draft for a script proposal 
for the film production. 

MASONIC MUSEUM - 

V. W.Bro. Pos, Chairman of the Committee brought the members up 
to date on the investigation for the re-creation of a typical Lodge 
Room in a pioneer setting as it may have appeared over 100 years ago. 
He also announced that the subject would be introduced at the Third 
Regional Masonic Workshop to be held at the University of Guelph. 
He also suggested that even though time was short and that it would 
be a major undertaking, the Lodge may wish to consider this as a 
proposed project for our 125th Anniversary Celebrations. Such a 
project may take several years for completion, but it could be 
initiated during the coming year. 

LODGE LIBRARY - 

Rev.W. Gray Rivers, Chairman of the Committee reported that he 
was just getting acquainted with the problems of organization. He 
expressed the view, that the Lodge Library may be useful only for 
members and local lodges in close proximity to the Temple and that 
the more serious masonic scholar may wish to use the more complete 
facilities of the Grand Lodge Library or establish their own personal 
library. Bro. Pos reviewed the original objectives for the estab- 
lishment of a Lodge Library, and also enlarged upon the program 
adopted by the Library Committee of the Guelph Masonic Temple Corp- 
oration of which he is the Chairman. He also reported that Brother 
Brian Thurston, originally from Toronto and now residing in Waterloo, 
had donated 110 valuable masonic books for use by the Lodge Brethren. 
This latest acquisition is currently being catalogued, and a complete 
listing will be made available to the members in a future Proceeding. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - 

R. W.Bro. David Bradley, Chairman of the Committee, had hoped 
to be able to present a budget for the balance of the year, but he 
had been unable to obtain sufficient cost data to enable him to do 
so. However, with the cooperation of Ed Wilson and Jack Pos, he 
planned to submit a complete budget at a subsequent meeting. 

FURNISHINGS & REGALIA - 

No Report at this time. However, the Committee proposed that 
the founding Officers of the Lodge may wish to donate the collar and 
jewel of their respective offices, and if convenient the jewel could 
be engraved or other means of recognition or acknowledgement would be 
permitted. Funds, earmarked for this purpose or other tools and 
equipment, should be sent to the Lodge Secretary. It was hoped that 
these details could be completed before the next Installation Cere- 
monies, November 21st, 1979. 

We are indeed grateful to Concord Lodge No. 722, G.R.C., our 
sponsoring Lodge, for allowing us to use their Regalia and Equipment, 
but we should not impose on them any longer than need be. Therefore, 
send in your donations as soon as possible. 



- 7 



LODGE SEAL & BANNER - 

Since the work of this Committee has been completed, the 
Committee of General Purposes, in dissolving the original committee, 
extended unanimous applause for their efforts in the final design 
of the Lodge Seal and expressed particular appreciation to V.W.Bro. 
Stewart Thurtell, Chairman, for his generous donation of a four-year 
supply of dues cards engraved with the Lodge Seal. 

At this time R.W.Bro. Flynn, Chairman of the Committee on Lodge 
By-Laws presented his own report. He outlined the various changes 
introduced by the Special Grand Lodge Committee on the Revised 
Constitution and commented that none of our recommendations following 
the second revision had been implemented. He expressed particular 
concern for the new procedure required for the processing of applica- 
tions for affiliation and that even the old procedure was more 
acceptable, although he would like to receive permission from the 
Lodge to prepare a motion to that effect for presentation at the 
Annual Communication of Grand Lodge, July 17-19, 1979. 

It was regularly moved by V.W.Bro. Stewart Thurtell, seconded 
by R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, that the Lodge By-Laws Committee be 
authorized to prepare such motion/s as discussed in Lodge, partic- 
ularly as concerning the procedure for processing of applications 
for affiliation, and to present such motion/s at the Annual Communi- 
cation of Grand Lodge, July 17-19, 197 9. Carried. 

In this brief discussion that followed, M.W.Bro. Bailey explained 
the reasons for the new democratic procedure for the selection of 
the Deputy Grand Master as outlined in Section 41. He also mentioned 
that while the mileage distance, which would permit a member to hold 
office in the Lodge had been increased, there would be no difficulty 
in obtaining special dispensation for those residing beyond the 100 
kilometer limit particularly because of the unique character of The 
Heritage Lodge. 

GENERAL BUSINESS 

The Worshipful Master discussed briefly the arrangements for 
our Fraternal Visit to The Belleville Lodge No. 123, G.R.C. , 
Belleville, on June 7th, 1979 and asked for a show of hands as to 
the number who planned to attend. It was estimated that 15-20 may 
be attending. 

A report was called for from the Special Committee appointed to 
look into an alternative meeting night for The Heritage Lodge, but 
there was no one present to make the report. 

MOTION 

It was regularly moved by M.W.Bro. Bailey, seconded by R.W.Bro. 
Drew, that V.W.Bro. J. Pos be delegated the Proxy to represent The 
Heritage Lodge at the Annual Communication of Grand Lodge, July 18, 
1979. Carried. 

V.W.Bro. Pos, in discussing the question of applications for 
affiliation from masons not residing within our Grand Jurisdiction, 
and recognizing that they would not likely be attending any lodge 
meetings but who are desirous of receiving the published papers 
presented in Lodge, suggested that the Lodge offer the Proceedings 
on a subscription basis. He suggested that the format of the Lodge 
Proceedings be modified by printing the Lodge Summons on a separate 
page which would be mailed only to Lodge Members. This would extend 
the efforts of the Lodge Researchers to those interested masons who 
are unable to satisfy the residency requirement. 



MOTION 

It was regularly moved by V.W.Bro. Pos, seconded by R.W.Bro. 
Bradley, that an annual subscription fee of $7.00 be charged for the 
Lodge Proceedings. 

AMENDMENT 

The motion was amended by M.W.Bro. Bailey, seconded by R.W. 
Bro. Drew, to increase the subscription fee from $7.00 to $10.00 
per annum. 

TABLED 

Moved by W.Bro. H.E. Edgar, seconded by Bro. John Neu, that the 
Motion be tabled until the next Regular Meeting. Carried. 

BALLOTING 

It was regularly moved by R.W.Bro. Throop, seconded by R.W.Bro. 
Bradley, that the ballot be taken collectively. Carried. 

Following a favourable ballot on all Applicants, the Worshipful 
Master declared: R.W.Bros. William Andy Isbister, Thomas E. Green- 
away; W.Bros. Ronald Fritzley, Graeme R. Miller, Alan Newton Newell, 
Leslie Trenwith Richardson, Thomas A. Silagy, Frank Gordon Simm, ' 
Thomas Edward Burton, Henry Johnston Armstrong; and Bros. Roger 
Allen Winter, James Barnett, John Steer, William James Boston, and 
William B. Bolton, eligible for membership by Affiliation. 

PAPER PRESENTATION 

At this time the Worshipful Master called on V.W.Bro. Pos to 
continue with the work of the evening. 

V.W.Bro. Pos, announced the procedure to be followed and then 
introduced M.W.Bro. William K. Bailey who presented a very informative 
paper titled: 

THE CONSTITUTION OF GRAND LODGE 
1855 - 1979 

by 

* M.W.BRO. WILLIAM K. BAILEY 

Among the most pressing matters claiming the attention of the 
delegates from the forty-one lodges assembled in Hamilton, Ontario 
on October 10, 1855 after they had decided to form an independent 
Grand Lodge was the framing of a Constitution. 

The Committee delegated by Grand Lodge to assume the task of 
preparing rules and regulations for the government of Grand Lodge 
and its private lodges .was directed to prepare a Constitution for 
presentation to Grand Lodge on the following morning. 

The first resolution that had been passed by the convention 
was to the effect that the proceedings were to be conducted according 
to the rules and regulations of the United Grand Lodge of England. 
It was, therefore, natural that the Committee would resort for 
guidance to the Book of Constitutions which had been adopted by the 
Second Provincial Grand Lodge of Upper Canada in 1823. This Consti- 
tution was, in fact, an unaltered reprinting of the Book of Consti - 
tutions which had been approved by the United Grand Lodge of England 
in 1815, after the Union, and issued in a corrected edition in 1819. 



- 9 



The title page of the Book of Constitutions of the Second Pro- 
vincial Grand Lodge bore, on its title page, the following words: 

"Constitutions of the Antient Fraternity of Free and Accepted 
Masons, Part the Second: Containing the Charges, Regulations, &c. 
&c; Published by the authority of the United Grand Lodge, by William 
Williams, Esq., Provincial Grand Master for the County of Dorset; 
First Canadian Edition; Republished by Order of the Provinicial 
Grand Lodge of Upper Canada; Kingston: Printed by H. C. Thomson; 
MDCCCXXIII. " 

On recommendation of the Committee, Grand Lodge on the following 
day adopted the Constitution of the United Grand Lodge of England 
mutatis mutandis (with the necessary changes) . The newly adopted 
Constitution was obviously intended to be provisional, since a reso- 
lution was passed to appoint a committee to revise and amend the 
rules and regulations, and to report at the first Annual Communica- 
tion, in July 1856. 

The Committee reported that it had consulted the several Masonic 
authorities, and had weighed well what appeared to them to be the 
desires of the fraternity in Canada. The amended Constitution was 
debated item by item, adopted, and ordered to be printed as the 
Constitution of the Grand Lodge of Canada. 

Many of the articles were taken word for word from the ». Constitu- 
tions of the Second Provincial Grand Lodge; others were altered to 
meet the administrative and jurisdictional needs of the new Grand 
Lodge. Some of the more significant changes were as follows. 

(a) The principal officers of Grand Lodge and the constituent 
lodges were to be elected by ballot without nomination. 

(b) A brother was to be ineligible for election as Grand Master 
for a third consecutive term; he was however, again eligible after 
one year. 

(c) The Deputy Grand Master was to be elected from a part of 
the Province other than where the Grand Master resided. 

(d) Each lodge was to be allotted three votes, and each Past 
Master one vote, at the Annual Communication of Grand Lodge. 

(e) All eleven Standing Committees were to be appointed by the 
Grand Master. 

(f) Dual membership was not be permitted. 

(g) With dispensation from the Grand Master, a lodge was per- 
mitted to entertain a petition from a man under twenty-one years of 
age. 

AMENDMENT OF THE CONSTITUTION 

Evidently the Constitution of 18 56 did not meet the wishes of 
the fraternity. Fifty-six amendments were proposed the next year, 
and ten of them were adopted on the recommendation of the Committee 
on the Constitution. For future years, in order that the Committee 
and the lodges might have ample opportunity to study any proposed 
alterations, notices of motion in writing were to be filed with the 
Grand Secretary six months in advance of the Annual Communication, 
with at least three months' notice to all lodges. In 1863 notices 
of motion were required to be given at the previous Annual Communi- 
cation, and a two-thirds majority was mandatory for adoption of an 
amendment . 

In 1884 Grand Lodge decided that the articles should be numbered 
consecutively, instead of (as hithertofore) being numbered within 
each section. This would facilitate the preparation and insertion 
of an index. 



- 10 - 

A Committee on Constitution and Laws was approved by Grand 
Lodge in 1898 as a Standing Committee of the Board of General 
Purposes; all proposed amendments would be referred to it for a ruling 
on their constitutionality. In 1892 a two-thirds vote was required 
in order to permit reconsideration of a notice of motion within a 
period of five years from the date of its first presentation. In 
subsequent years, changes required notices of motion to be submitted 
to the Grand Secretary on or before March 1 (1905), May 1 (1916), 
April 1 (1974); the dates by which notice must be sent to lodges 
were changed to keep an appropriate interval. 

Hardly an Annual Communication of Grand Lodge was passed without 
one or more amendments being proposed, to meet the needs and desires 
of Grand Lodge and the private lodges. There have been four Annual 
Communications at which it was recognized that nothing short of a 
major review and revision would be acceptable. 

As early as 1864 the entire Constitution as reviewed, revised 
and adopted set a pattern of rules and regulations which has been 
maintained up to the present time particularly for the government 
of the Craft through a Board of General Purposes. 

In 1886 a Special Committee which had been appointed the previous 
year reported as follows. 

"Your Committee resolved upon a plan for a new Constitution,- 
wherein would be shown, not only the law contained in the present 
Constitution, but which would also be laid down in a systematic and 
condensed form, all such rules, regulations and resolutions of Grand 
Lodge and rulings and decisions of Grand Masters up to the present 
date; which have the force of law, and which to your Committee, 
appears as being desirable to continue as laws; thereby greatly 
facilitating enquiry by the brethren as to what is the law of Grand 
Lodge" . 

The draft Constitution was printed in the 1886 Proceedings as 
a notice of motion, for study by the lodges prior to the Annual 
Communication and debate at it. In 1887, the eighty-five revised 
by-laws were discussed clause by clause. Twenty-three of the 
recommended amendments were deleted, and the remainder were accepted, 
a few with minor changes. Perhaps the change which was of greatest 
interest to the other Grand Lodges in Canada was the amendment in 
the style and title of the Grand Lodge of Canada, by adding the 
words "in the Province of Ontario". 

So many amendments were proposed at the Annual Communication in 
1903 that Grand Lodge approved the appointment of a Special Committee 
to review and revise the Constitution, thereby satisfying the 
sponsors and gaining their agreement to withdraw their respective 
motions. The Committee was directed to prepare a draft with a new 
index, for submission to the lodges at least four months in advance 
of the Annual Communication. The Committee reported in 1904 that 
it had been unable to fulfill the terms of its assignment, and 
requested that it be discharged and that a new committee be appointed 
under similar terms. The revised Constitution (with the exception 
of a recommendation for the approval of undress regalia) was adopted 
in 1905. The revision had entailed a major rearranging and rewriting 
of the Constitution under new sub-headings; rulings of Grand Masters 
and resolutions of Grand Lodge over the previous twenty years were 
integrated into the text where they were considered necessary for the 
continued governance of the Craft. 

In 1972 another period of intensive review began. A revised 
draft was submitted to the lodges in August 1977 for study and 
constructive criticism, and then a second draft was circulated in 



11 



October 1978 for further study and criticism. In July 1979 following 
an appropriate notice of motion a redraft will be presented to Grand 
Lodge for approval with any accepted alterations or amendments. 
It will incorporate into the body of the text nearly one hundred 
rulings of Grand Master, some of them dating back to 1859. Also 
included will be a new provision that, in future, rulings of Grand 
Masters will either cease to be in effect at the next Annual Commun- 
ication, or will be approved for integration into the Constitution 
as rules and regulations. 

NOMINATION AND ELECTION OF GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 

The first amendment to the Constitution of 1856 was approved 
the next year, when the clause stating that the Grand Master was 
ineligible for a third consecutive term was rescinded. Nominations 
for the elective offices of Grand Lodge were not permitted until 
1864; that year approval was given, but the next year it was with- 
held by the members of Grand Lodge. 

Right from the inception of the Board of General Purposes, the 
Constitution had provided for nomination of its members. But year 
after year Grand Lodge refused to allow amendments which would permit 
nomination of elective Grand Lodge officers. In 1896 the debate 
on a motion clearly indicated a great demand for nominations. After 
agreement from the sponsors of the motion that they would withdraw 
it, Grand Lodge approved the appointment of a Committee to study the 
subject of nominations for elective Grand Lodge officers. The way 
was cleared by the following amendments, which were adopted in 1897. 

(a) That the Grand Master and Deputy Grand Master be elected 
without nomination; 

(b) That the other elective Grand Lodge officers and the five 
members of the Board of General Purposes be elected after nomination; 

(c) That nominations be in writing to the Grand Secretary, 
between the fifteenth day preceding the Annual Communication and 6:00 
p.m. of the first day of the Communication; 

(d) That the Grand Secretary be directed to print and distribute 
a list of such nominations before the opening of Grand Lodge on the 
second day of the Communication; and 

(e) That registration be closed at 11:00 a.m. and voting be 
closed at 12:00 noon on the second day of the Communication. 

In 1905 the close of registration was moved back to 9:00 a.m. 
of the second day, with voting to close at 10:00 a.m. In 1936 and 
194 2 Special Committees appointed to study the system of nominations 
and the agenda of Grand Lodge recommended against any changes; their 
recommendations were approved. In 194 3 Grand Lodge approved a 
closing date for nominations of June 24, with the lodges to be 
notified on or before July 3. The close of registration was set at 
4:30 p.m. of the first day, the start of voting at 5:30 p.m. and its 
close at 7:30. In subsequent years these regulations were amended 
as follows. 

1946 Voting to close at 7:00 p.m. 
1956 Voting to close at 6:30 p.m. 

1970 Registration to close at 4:00 p.m.; voting to commence 
at 5:00 p.m. 

1972 The Grand Master to set the times for voting. 

1973 Registration to close at 3:30 p.m. 

1975 Closing date for nominations to be April 1; lodges to 
be notified on or before April 15. 

Except for reasons of death, illness, or personal wish, it had 
been the regular custom to re-elect the Grand Master and the Deputy 



- 12 - 

Grand Master for a second year. It was not until 1926 that Grand 
Lodge approved an amendment which gave a two-year term to these two 
officers and to the Grand Treasurer and Grand Secretary. In 1957 
Grand Lodge decreed that a brother could not be eligible for nomina- 
tion for more than one elective office of Grand Lodge (including for 
the purposes of this amendment nomination for the Board of General 
Purposes) . 

From time to time changes in the Constitution have been 
proposed which would permit District Deputy Grand Masters to be 
elected at District annual meetings. To date, Grand Lodge has 
allowed this privilege to Western District only. In 1909 Grand 
Lodge turned down a proposal that a committee should be appointed 
to study a system in which the elective Grand Lodge Officers and 
the Members of the Board of General Purposes should be elected at 
the regular May meetings of the constituent lodges. According to 
this plan, nominations would be submitted on the last day of the 
preceeding Annual Communication; ballots would be sent to the lodges 
before May, and the sealed ballots would be forwarded to the Grand 
Secretary. They would be counted by duly appointed scrutineers on 
the day before the Annual Communication. 

RULINGS OF GRAND MASTERS 

Despite the fact that significant amendments were made to the 
Constitution from year to year, Grand Masters were still called upon, 
or felt obligated, to make rulings. In like manner, Grand Lodge 
adopted resolutions to satisfy the needs and to solve the problems 
of lodges. Until 187 5, these rulings and resolutions (which were 
fully as binding upon the Craft as the Constitution) appeared only 
in the Proceedings. That year the Board of General Purposes under- 
took to provide wider circulation of this information by directing 
that the resolutions of Grand Lodge and the rulings of Grand Masters 
that had the force of law and which appeared in Proceedings since 
1855 should be extracted and compiled as a ready reference for Grand 
Lodge and lodge officers alike. This was the authority for the 
printing of Rules and Resolutions of Grand Lodge by R.W.Bro. Otto 
Klotz in 1875. 

In the major revision of 1887 such of the rulings and resolu- 
tions as were considered desirable to be continued were incorporated 
into the Constitution. Again in 1905 a similar integration of rulings 
and resolutions was made. With the Grand Master being called on to 
make as many as fifty or sixty rulings of decisions in any one year, 
it was almost inevitable that some rulings might be at variance with 
others. In 1920 the Grand Secretary, R.W.Bro. W.M. Logan, completed 
a new compilation of Grand Masters* Rulings. The Grand Master, M.W. 
Bro. F. W. Harcourt, observed that it could prove useful to lodge 
officers, and could relieve the Grand Master of volumes of correspon- 
dence, if it were made available to the lodges. The following year 
Grand Lodge approved the compilation of 140 rulings which had been 
reviewed and recommended to it by a Committee. The rulings were 
printed as a separate booklet and distributed to the lodges. In 
1935 the Grand Master ,' M.W. Bro. F.A. Copus, noted that a new digest 
of rulings had been prepared, and that it would be inserted in the 
Book of Constitution as an addendum, so that it would be accessible 
to all members. 

In 1973 the Special Committee on the Reorganization and Revision 
of the Constitution recommended that the printed rulings of Grand 
Masters should be classified as follows. 



13 - 



(a) Rulings which were accepted as rules of procedure and thus 
would be incorporated with little or no revision into the Constitution; 

(b) Rulings that covered a general principle and thus would 
likely appear in a revised form; 

(c) Rulings which applied to very specific cases and thus would 
either be deleted or appear in an amended form; and 

(d) Rulings which appeared to lack relevancy in the present 
Constitution and would thus be deleted. 

Grand Lodge approved the report, as well as the Grand Master's 
recommendation that certain rulings which fell into the fourth 
category should be rescinded. The 1979 Constitution, if adopted, 
will provide that all rulings and decisions of Grand Masters in 
future years should be reviewed at the following Annual Communication, 
and be either recommended to and approved by Grand Lodge for incor- 
poration as amendments to the Constitution, or if not so approved be 
no longer in effect. 

MASONIC JURISPRUDENCE 

In the early years of Grand Lodge the want was sorely felt of 
an extensive alphabetical digest on Canadian Masonic Law, arranged 
in a methodical manner and convenient for reference. R.W.Bro. Henry 
Robertson, later to become Grand Master in 1886-1888, undertook to 
fill this need. He was well qualified, by his experience as District 
Deputy Grand Master for two years, as Chairman of the Committee on 
Grievances and Appeals for several years, by his training and practice 
as a lawyer, and by his extensive reading in law and Masonry. The 
foundation of his work was the Constitution of Grand Lodge, the ruling; 
and decisions of Grand Masters, and the Proceedings of Grand Lodge. 
He also resorted to standard works of Masonic Jurisprudence. 

Masonic Jurisprudence , a book of 300 pages, met with ready 
and generous acceptance by Grand Lodge officers, Masters, and lodge 
officers — brethren who were often appealed to for decisions 
respecting the governance of the Craft in general, and the lodges 
in particular. The book was first published in 1881; it was re- 
printed in 1889, and again in 1899. 

BOARD OF GENERAL PURPOSES 

In 1860 Grand Lodge approved the appointment of a Special 
Committee to prepare a code of rules and regulations for the 
government of a Board of General Purposes, and to define its powers. 
The necessary amendment to the Constitution was adopted in 18 61. 
It gave the Board substantial powers and responsibilities in the 
conduct of Grand Lodge's affairs; e.g., 

(a) Management of the finances of Grand Lodge, and directions 
to the Grand Treasurer; 

(b) Hearing and determining all subjects of Masonic complaint; 

(c) Inspection of all books and records relating to the 
accounts of Grand Lodge; 

(d) Custody of buildings and furniture; 

(e) Making the necessary preparations for all communications 
of Grand Lodge; 

(f) Ordering all the usual and ordinary articles required by 
Grand Lodge; 

(g) Care and regulation of all the concerns of Grand Lodge; 
(h) Charge of all the correspondence of Grand Lodge; 

(i) Recommendations to Grand Lodge for the welfare and good 
government of the Craft; 

(j) Initiation of plans for the better regulation of Grand Lodge, 
and arrangements for its general transactions. 



- 14 - 

At the same time, Grand Lodge went one step further, on 
recommendation of the Special Committee and approved the establish- 
ment of a General Committee, to be composed of the Board of General 
Purposes and the Masters of the constituent lodges. It was 
charged with the following duties and responsibilities. 

(a) To meet at some convenient time immediately preceding the 
Annual Communication; 

(b) To hear any and all reports of the Grand Master, Deputy 
Grand Master, District Deputy Grand Masters, or other Grand Officers, 
or any member intending to make a motion in Grand Lodge for consid- 
eration or recommendation to it; 

(c) To nominate a Committee on Credentials; and 

(d) To receive nominations for Grand Lodge Office and for the 
Board of Purposes prior to the Annual Communication. 

There was obviously some dissatisfaction with the Board of 
General Purposes - General Committee concept for the government of 
the affairs of Grand Lodge. A notice was given in July 1862 that a 
motion would be proposed at the next annual communication that so 
much of the Constitution as refers to the Board of General Purposes 
and the General Committee be struck out and further to amend the 
same as regards the government of Grand Lodge. 

At the annual communication in July 1863 Grand Lodge considered 
and approved the proposed amendments to the Constitution as submitted 
to the lodges in April 1863 up to but not including amendments 
relative . to a Board of General Purposes and matters pertaining to 
private lodges. Instead of debating these issues Grand Lodge 
approved that the Grand Master be requested to appoint a Special 
Committee to consider the amendments to the Constitution as proposed 
by R.Wor.Bro. J. C. Franck in his notice of motion given in 1862 
as a substitute for the Board of General Purposes with directions 
to report to this Grand Lodge. 

In reporting to Grand Lodge the following day, the Special 
Committee recommended that all references to a Board of General 
Purposes be omitted and replaced by a General Committee of 32 members, 
16 to be appointed by the Grand Master for a two-year term (8 in 
each year) and 16 to be elected by Grand Lodge for a two-year term 
(8 in each year) with at least one-half to be actual Masters at the 
time of appointment or election. 

Grand Lodge rather than proceeding to approve this report 
resolved that further consideration and final amendment of the Con- 
stitution be deferred until the next annual communication of Grand 
Lodge and that the Grand Secretary be required to print and forward 
copy of further proposed alterations with instructions to the lodges 
to return to him, at least three months before the next annual 
communication of Grand Lodge, with any suggested alterations or 
amendments. 

In 1864 at the annual communication the Constitution as adopted 
retained the concept of, the Board of General Purposes of 20 elected 
and appointed members for two-year terms (10 in each year) with the 
proviso that not more than one-half of the elected and appointed 
members be Past Masters. As such the concept that the governing body 
of Grand Lodge should be composed equally of actual Masters and 
Past Masters was endorsed. This policy so approved has never been 
carried into effect even for the year of 1864-5 when of the 12 
elected and appointed members only two were actual Masters. Thereby 
the concept of a General Committee for involving the Masters of the 
lodges in the government of the affairs of Grand Lodge was abandoned 
after three years of functioning with no attempts to revive it in 
all the intervening years to this date. 



15 



The Board of General Purposes as instituted in 1861 consisted 
of the Grand Master, Deputy Grand Master, District Deputy Grand 
Master of each district, two Grand Wardens, and twenty other members, 
ten nominated by the Grand Master and ten elected by Grand Lodge in 
alternate years, five of each being chosen each year; not more than 
one-half were to be Past Masters. The names of nominees for elec- 
tion were to be delivered to the Grand Secretary before the Annual 
Communication. Past Grand Masters were added to the Board in 1872; 
the same year the requirement that not more than half the number of 
appointed and elected members be Past Masters was rescinded. In 
1909 Grand Lodge approved the inclusion of the Grand Treasurer and 
Grand Secretary. In 1926 the Grand Chaplain, Grand Registrar, and 
Grand Director of Ceremonies were added. The number of elected 
and appointed members in each year was increased from five to seven 
in 1963. 

Originally the Board was scheduled to meet once in six months, 
with one meeting at least to be held the day before each Annual 
Communication. In 1878 the semi-annual meeting was discontinued, 
and in 1905 the one-day meeting before Grand Lodge was extended to 
two days. 

The Constitution was amended in 1868 to provide reimbursement 
to the members of the Board for mileage and per diem; it was changed 
the next year to actual expenses only. From time to time Grand Lodge 
has been asked to defray, in part at least, the expenses incurred by 
District Deputy Grand Masters, in purchasing regalia, and in visit- 
ing lodges, particularly in large districts. Grand Lodge has con- 
sistently disclaimed any responsibility for assuming these expenses; 
but it did acknowledge the financial hardship by requesting lodges 
to make contributions. It was not until 1905 that Grand Lodge 
decided that the cost of the District Deputy Grand Master's regalia 
and jewel should be borne by the lodges of the District on a per 
capita basis. In 1933 the Grand Master ruled that lodges were 
obligated to pay the traveling expenses of the District Deputy Grand 
Master for at least one official visit each year. 

Since 1944 the Board has not had the authority to examine all 
financial claims on Grand Lodge, and to order the Grand Treasurer 
to pay them. His annual report to Grand Lodge, and that of the 
Grand Secretary, are however still referred to the Board's Committee 
on Audit and Finance. The making of the necessary preparations for 
all meetings of Grand Lodge festivals, public ceremonies, and other 
meetings, while still nominally the responsibility of the Board, 
has for the last number of years devolved on the Grand Secretary. 

MASONIC REGALIA AND INSIGNIA 

In 1855 when Grand Lodge approved the design and ornamenta- 
tion of regalia and insignia for Grand Lodge officers, lodge 
officers, and members, in essence it adopted those of the United 
Grand Lodge of England. Except for the regalia of the Grand 
Stewards (which were crimson with silver trimming) , the regalias 
of Grand Lodge Officers were garter blue with gold trimming; 
the colour for lodge members was sky blue. Only the Grand Master 
wore a fringe of gold bullion on his apron. In 1868 The Barton 
Lodge, No. 6, was given the distinction of gold jewels and trimming; 
likewise Niagara Lodge, No. 2, in 1871. 

The details of measurement, design, and ornamentation of 
regalia and insignia were spelled out more specifically in the 1886 
revision of the Constitution. Past Grand Masters, Past Deputy Grand 
Masters, and Past District Deputy Grand Masters were entitled to 
wear, pendant to their collars, the jewel designating their past rank; 



16 - 



all other Past Grand Lodge officers were restricted to a past rank 
jewel worn on their breasts. 

In 1891 there was a further detailing of specifications, 
especially for gauntlets. Elective Grand Lodge officers were 
permitted ornamentation of their aprons with gold bullion fringe; 
Grand Stewards were allowed a silver fringe. The collar of the 
Grand Master was to be designed with nine stars, and that of the 
Deputy Grand Master with seven stars; but Grand Lodge declined to 
approve a similar collar with five stars for the District Deputy 
Grand Master. Designs for the collars, aprons, and jewels of Grand 
Lodge and lodge officers, executed in plates, were to be supplied 
to the regalia manufacturers. 

For the 1905 review of the Constitution no changes in the 
designs of the Grand Lodge and lodge regalia were recommended, 
except that design specifications for undress regalia and insignia 
were proposed for approval. Grand Lodge however, did not give its 
approval for the wearing of undress regalia for Past Grand Lodge 
officers. Motion to permit undress regalia were presented in 1906, 
and again in 1907, but were not approved. The following year the 
motion was approved and the necessary amendment was adopted. As 
a magnanimous gesture to Grand Lodge for the honours he had enjoyed, 
M.W. Bro. John Ross Robertson in 1909 presented a set of undress 
regalia for Past Grand Lodge officers, to be used at the discretion 
of Grand Loadge and the Grand Master. 

With several lodges nearing their one hundredth year, Grand 
Lodge in 1922, approved "That a lodge which has attained its one 
hundredth year of continuous and active service in the Craft be 
entitled as a special marking of such features to have, if so desired, 
the jewels of its officers made of gold or gold plated, the aprons 
of its officers to have the ornamentations and edgings or fringe in 
gold and the trimmings of the Master Mason's apron in gold." This 
approval was never introduced as an amendment to the Constitution, 
and hence it did not appear in print in the Constitution for 
several years. 

In his Address to Grand Lodge in 1944, M.W. Bro. T. C. Wardley 
noted that, when the section on Masonic clothing was re-written in 
1905, the plates to illustrate the respective designs had never 
been prepared and deposited with the regalia supply firms. Neither 
had specific designs and plates been prepared in 1922, when permis- 
sion was granted to hundred-year lodges to have gold ornamentation. 
Accordingly, unauthorized changes in regalia had crept in over the 
years. He recommended the appointment of a committee to review 
the matter of regalia for both Grand Lodge and lodge officers and 
members. 

The Committee on Regalia at the Annual Communications in 1945 
and 1946 reported progress in its study and requested more time. 
In 1947 it presented descriptions and designs which would not be 
appreciably at variance with those in the past, but about which 
regalia supply firms could be without doubt. Designs and plates 
were once again assured, but apparently delivery has never been 
carried out. In its report the committee felt that for the future 
lodges would be assured of regalia and insignia of standard design, 
good appearance, and high quality, at reasonable cost. Definite 
restrictions in the design and ornamentation permitted on regalia 
of officers and members of hundred-year-old lodges were laid down. 
It was clearly stated, however, that the regalia then in use by one 
hundred year lodges would not be affected. Henceforth, the 
regalia of Grand Stewards was to be garter blue instead of crimson, 
so that it would harmonize with the regalia of other Grand Lodge 
officers. 



- 17 



In 1965 permission was granted for the emblem of office to be 
embroidered in sky blue on the Master Mason apron. The wearing of 
cuffs by Past Grand Lodge officers was made optional in 1971; cuffs 
were declared not to be a part of the regalia for Past Grand Lodge 
officers in the 1979 revision of the Constitution. 

RULES RESPECTING MASONIC TRIALS 

No provision was made for rules respecting Masonic trials in 
the 1855 Constitution. Lodges did however, have the power to 
exclude (not expel) a member for gross immoral or infamous behaviour, 
or for non-payment of dues. A member so excluded did have the right 
of fair and just hearing, and appeal to the District Deputy Grand 
Master, and in turn to the Grand Master. A Mason who offended 
against any law or regulation of the Craft where no specific penalty 
was attached was subject to admonition or suspension, or (by Grand 
Lodge only) expulsion. 

In 1872 the Board of General Purposes recommended that a 
committee be appointed to review the rules for the regulation of 
Masonic Trials, and to review the part of the Constitution relating 
to that subject, with a view to eliminating some inconsistencies and 
making a general improvement in it. 

At the Annual Communication in 1874, Grand Lodge approved the 
rules and regulations for the government of Masonic Traisl which 
R.W.Bro. J. K. Kerr had prepared at the request of the Grand Master. 
R.W.Bro. Kerr stressed in his submission that the lodge ought invar- 
iably to assume responsibility for proceeding against a brother who 
had committed an alleged Masonic offence. In defining Masonic 
offences, Bro. Kerr made this pertinent observation. "In general 
terms, it may be said that every violation by a Mason of his Masonic 
covenant or obligations, or of the established laws, usages and 
customs of the Order, — every violation of the moral law and every 
violation of the laws of the land involving moral turpitude, is a 
Masonic offence." He went on to say, "Masonic tribunals do not 
assume to adjust mere legal right — pecuniary or otherwise; nor do 
they take cognizance of difficulties of a legal character growing 
out of business transactions between brethren, or breaches of 
contract or agreement between one Mason and another, unless the 
circumstances disclose unmistakeable fraud, or moral turpitude on 
the part of the offender" . Grand Lodge and the lodges had been 
plagued year after year with the pressing of charges by one Mason 
against another with the object of collecting a debt. 

The rules and regulations proposed and adopted by Grand Lodge 
at that time have in the main set the pattern followed by Grand 
Lodge to this day. They were printed and distributed to the lodges 
in 1875 in a book bound together with the Resolutions of Grand Lodge 
and Rulings of Grand Masters, by R.W.Bro. Otto Klotz. 

The Board of General Purposes recommended, and in 1883 Grand 
Lodge authorized another review of the rules and regulations respect- 
ing Masonic Trials, and of that part of the Constitution relating 
to the subject. Among the changes adopted by Grand Lodge were the 
following. 

(a) A restriction of the powers of the District Deputy Grand 
Master in hearing and settling complaints within his own district, 
unless specifically authorized by the Grand Master; 

(b) Any complaints of one member against another were to be 
heard and settled in the lodge before any appeal was made to the 
Grand Master, the Board of General Purposes, or a committee; 



- 18 



(c) The power of a lodge was restricted to recommendation of 
expulsion; and 

(d) The procedures for lodging and hearing appeals were 
clarified. 

Grand Lodge directed that the regulations respecting Trials 
as published in the Proceedings of 1883 be substituted for the 
regulations hitherto in force. In 1916 the appellant against 
expulsion or for restoration was required to appear before the 
Committee of Grievances and Appeals of the Board of General Purposes, 
instead of before Grand Lodge. In 1921 and 1926 clarifications were 
made in the procedures to be followed when a lodge recommended, 
or did not recommend, expulsion of a member. In 19 35 a committee, 
in reporting on the adequacy of the rules respecting Masonic Trials, 
did not recommend any changes, and Grand Lodge approved the report. 
In 1944 authority was given to the Grand Master to appoint Trial 
Commissions when be believed that the case and circumstances 
warranted them. 

In the proposed revision of Rules for governing Masonic Trials 
to be presented to Grand Lodge in July 1979 the single most signif- 
icant change will be that the accused be given the option of 
selecting whether he wishes to be tried by the lodge or by Trial 
Commission appointed by the Master and approved by the lodge. 
However, if the complaint is made by a non-mason, then Trial by 
Commission is of course required. 

RULES RESPECTING GRANTS FOR BENEVOLENCE 

Grand Lodge did not formulate any rules respecting grants for 
benevolence in the 1855 Constitution. The earliest mention of 
benevolence appeared in the 1863 Proceedings, when the interest 
from a grant by Grand Lodge of fiteen hundred pounds was allocated 
for benevolence. The following year Grand Lodge approved that ten 
per cent of all fees and dues payable by lodges to Grand Lodge 
should be reserved. During the next ten years such reserved funds 
were supplemented by annual appropriations totalling $16,000. 

Commencing as early as 1864 and 1865, resolutions establishing 
guide-lines or rules respecting grants for benevolence were presented 
to Grand Lodge for approval. 

(a) Applications must contain information on aid being provided 
by private lodges; 

(b) Applications must be filed prior to the annual meeting of 
the Board of General Purposes; 

(c) Applications must contain information on the financial 
circumstances of the applicants; 

(d) Applications must be made only through private lodges or 
Boards of Relief; 

(e) Unaffiliated brethren are not eligible for grants; and 

(f) Grants shall not be made more frequently than twice a year, 
except in extraordinary circumstances. 

In 1886 a compilations of the resolutions of Grand Lodge, and 
the formulation of additional rules, were made an addendum to the 
Constitution. In 1922 revisions were made to eight of the fourteen 
rules adopted in 1886. Lodges were denied the privilege of voting 
at the Annual Communication unless and until all requirements for 
completion of applications for grants were met. An application was 
required for renewal of a grant, and a grant could be made to an 
unaffiliated brother on recommendation of the Grand Master. In 
1926 approval was given for the establishment and operation of local 
Boards of Relief. In 19 31 some minor adjustments were made to the 
rules. 



- 19 



It appears that necessity was the mother of invention in the 
formulation of rules respecting grants for benevolence. As the 
numbers of applicants increased, and variations in need became 
apparent, there developed the necessity to bring about some 
uniformity in adjudication. 

MISCELLANEOUS 

(a) The question of dual membership was debated frequently in 
the early years of Grand Lodge. It was permitted in 1855; the next 
year the question was deferred to the effective date of 1857; it 
was disallowed in 1871, and allowed the next year; and so on. 

(b) Motions to have the business of the lodge transacted in 
the Third Degree were proposed at seven Annual Communications of 
Grand Lodge, but on each time Grand Lodge witheld its approval. 

(c) Time after time resolutions were proposed which would ban 
spirituous or fermented liquors during the refreshment of private 
lodges; they were voted down each time. In 1884 Grand Lodge gave 
half-hearted approval, by agreeing that the practice or custom was 
not desirable. A similar ban was proposed in 1891 and 1892, but was 
rejected. 

REVIEWS 

M.W.Bro. Bailey's paper was reviewed by R.W.Bro. David Bradley, 
R.W.Bro. Edsel Steen and R.W.Bro. William McVittie. 

REVIEWED BY R.W.BRO. DAVID BRADLEY 

The Constitution is a timely and topical subject. It is 
necessary, at some juncture in the history of an organization, to 
review its pattern of regulatory growth; essentially to evaluate 
trends of legal thought and to fuse these with the wishes of the 
general membership, as to the manner in which they wish to be gov- 
erned. For, after all, the Masonic Order is a voluntary organiza- 
tion. Rules are not imposed from the top because legal restraints 
arise from the willingness of the rank and file to accept regulation. 

The presentation is both novel and refreshing in its approach 
to what could be a tedious and wearisome subject. It begins with 
the first Constitution, its subsequent amendments, and then selects 
certain highlights to comment upon and trace their development. 

A review of the paper cannot take issue with the dates or 
history of the events described. Each individual reader must be 
left, therefore, to pull a thread from the tapestry and bemoan an 
omission of particular personal preference. It is in this vein, 
for example, that a deeper insight into the problem of dual member- 
ship would have been interesting. Dual membership was abolished in 
1856 to be effective after the Annual Communication of 1857. And 
yet, the day after the approval of the ban, a motion to repeal it 
was proposed. If opposition was so strong, how had it become a 
regulation in the first place? 

The Board of General Purposes came into existence in 1861 and, 
until that time, the form of government adopted by the U.S.A. 
jurisdictions was apparently followed. In view of the use of the 
English Constitution as a base, what was the reason for working under 
a part of the rules of the American jurisdiction? In terms of 
present day life it is hard to understand the problems and difficul- 
ties encountered by the brethren in those early days; the reasons 
for taking certain courses of action would be of great interest to 
us. It is in this sense that a purely historical review of events 
loses some of its magic and meaning. 



- 20 - 



The author is to be commended on the paper as it is an exercise 
necessary to the understanding of Masonry. The story of the manner 
in which the governing rules are developed says a great deal about 
the integrity and worth of an organization. 

REVIEWED BY R.W.BRO. EDSEL STEEN 

It is a timely 'capsule' history of the Book of Constitution 
adopted in 1855 to the present time. It is very interesting and 
factual, covering the major rules and regulations and Committees 
over a period of 124 years. 

At a time when we are about to approve a revised constitution, 
this paper should provide impetus for its adoption. It is a paper 
that every Mason should read. 

Two minor changes may have improved the paper. The title is 
somewhat misleading because it indicates an article covering the 
Constitution of Grand Lodge in 1855 whereas it covers 124 years. 
Secondly, the paper ends rather abruptly with Chapter 10, page 19. 
It leaves the reader wondering if all the pages were included or 
perhaps it is only the feeling one gets when reading it — that 
you would like to read more. 

REVIEWED BY R.W.BRO. WM. S. MCVITTIE 

I personally feel greatly indebted to M.W.Bro. Wm. K. Bailey 
for his putting together the story of the development and evolution 
of our Constitution of Grand Lodge. There is only one change I 
would recommend — a change in the Title of this paper from 'THE 
CONSTITUTION OF GRAND LODGE' to 'THE EVOLUTION OF THE CONSTITUTION 
OF GRAND LODGE' . 

I am fortunate in having a copy of the Constitution dated 
January 1869; another copy dated January 1871; another dated July 
1905 as well as a copy of 'RESOLUTIONS OF GRAND LODGE and RULINGS 
OF GRAND MASTERS of the GRAND LODGE OF CANADA' that have the force 
of law, dated 1883 as extracted and compiled by Otto Kotz, P.D.D.G.M. 
of Preston as well as the Proceedings of Grand Lodge from 1856 up 
to 1905 and from having read and re-read these I appreciate the 
excellent research and editing Bro. Bailey has done for us in 
presenting us with this story of the gradual evolution of our 
Constitution. 

We have nothing but high praise for the results of his labours. 
First he tells us about the beginning of our Grand Lodge and its 
earliest Constitutions. We can picture in our mind the Second Grand 
Lodge Communication in 1856 when the amended Constitution was debated 
item by item and then of the Third Grand Lodge Communication of 1857 
when fifty- six amendments were presented of which only ten were 
adopted. An then, the steady amendment year by year of our Constitu- 
tion to give us what we now have. 

Bro. Bailey covers in some detail different aspects of the 
Constitution — such as NOMINATION AND ELECTION OF GRAND LODGE 
OFFICERS— RULINGS OF GRAND MASTERS— MASONIC JURISPRUDENCE— BOARD OF 
GENERAL PURPOSES — MASONIC REGALIA AND ENSIGNIA — RULES RESPECTING 
MASONIC TRIALS— RULES RESPECTING GRANTS FOR BENEVOLENCE— ending 
with a MISCELLANEOUS — to make his paper more all-inclusive. 

Every knowledgeable Mason in our Grand Jurisdiction should read 
and re-read M.W.Bro. Bailey's "THE CONSTITUTION OF GRAND LODGE" with 
much personal profit of time well spent. 



- 21 



INFORMAL DISCUSSION 

V.W.Bro. J. Pos - I would echoe the comments of our reviewers 
in complimenting M.W.Bro. Bailey for tracing the development of our 
present Book of Constitution. However, at no time in his presentation 
did M.W.Bro. Bailey mention a select body of masons known to us as 
the Grand East. My personal experience, in the very early develop- 
ment of The Heritage Lodge, was to have been invited to present the 
proposal for this unique Lodge to the Grand East and not to the 
Board of General Purposes. One would conclude from this that the 
"Board" is redundant and major decisions are made by a group of 
masons not legally structured within the framework of our Constitution 

SUMMARY BY M.W.BRO. WM. K. BAILEY 

On looking back over the paper, I would agree with R.W.Bro. 
McVittie the title "THE EVOLUTION OF THE CONSTITUTION OF GRAND LODGE" 
would have been more appropriate. The question of "Dual Membership" 
as raised by R.W.Bro. Bradley has been and still is a controversial 
subject. There are several Grand Lodges that either do not permit 
it at all or limit membership to only two lodges. 

Many lodges in American Jurisdictions conduct the business 
portion of the Regular Meeting in the third degree. We can be 
thankful that we did not pattern all our Constitution after the 
Americans where the D. D.G.Ms have greater influence. 

With regards the "Grand East" which consists essentially of 
Past Grand Masters, the Grand Master and the Deputy Grand Master, 
they have no clear authority but have evolved over the years perhaps 
originally with minor decisions being made by two or more masons 
because it seemed unwarranted to call a meeting of the Board of 
General Purposes and over the years more and more important decisions 
were made via this process, because it was too much trouble to 
call the Board. However, the Committee on Long Range Planning will 
be reviewing the current practice and making recommendations. But 
there should be no doubt our Constitution has come through a lot of 
sweat, blood and tears. 

CLOSE THE LODGE 

Following several announcements, and a special invitation by 
R.W.Bro. Throop (acting J.W.) on behalf of the local arrangements 
committee, to join in a brief social period with refreshments in 
the Banquet Hall, the Lodge was closed in harmony at 10:54 p.m. 



FRATERNAL VISIT TO BELLEVILLE LODGE NO. 123 

On June 7, 1979, several car loads of Members of The Heritage 
Lodge No. 730, journeyed from various parts of the Province to pay 
a fraternal visit to The Belleville Lodge No. 123, Belleville, 
Ontario. 

A total of 21 members of The Heritage Lodge were admitted into 
the Lodge at 8:25 p.m. and welcomed by the Worshipful Master, 
W.Bro. Earl M. Dafoe. 



- 22 - 



CONFERRING DEGREE 

Following an impressive Initiation Ceremony for Mr. Clinton 
Eugene Woodbeck by the Officers and Members of The Belleville Lodge, 
the meeting was turned over to R.W.Bro. Keith Flynn, Worshipful 
Master of The Heritage Lodge, who thanked the host Lodge for their 
kind and warm reception. He also complimented the Officers and 
Members of the Lodge for the excellent manner in which the Degree 
was conferred. 

INTRODUCTION 

At this time W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe was called on to introduce 
the Guest Speaker, V. W.Bro. D. J. Woods ide. 

Donald James Woodside, CD., B.A. , was born in North Gower and 
educated at Ottawa Normal School, Queen's University and the College 
of Education, Toronto. He was a Teacher and Principal and taught 
Mathematics in several Schools. He retired as a Mathematics Teacher 
from Brockville C.I. & V.S. He attained the rank of Major in the 
Militia. He has worked with the Boy Scouts Association for 30 years 
and was District Commissioner in Brockville. 

Brother Woodside was Initiated in Bonnechere Lodge No. 433, 
Eganville in 1938; Invested Worshipful Master of Cardinal Lodge 
No. 491 in 1945; Affiliated with Sussex Lodge No. 5, Brockville, 
in 1947 and has been Chairman of Masonic Education in Sussex Lodge 
for 25 years. He was Appointed Grand Senior Deacon in 1972. 

He is a member of the Correspondence Circle of Quator Coronati 
Lodge No. 2076 (1953), a member of Lodge of Research No. 2429, 
Leicester, England, and a member of The Heritage Lodge No. 730. 

PAPER PRESENTATION 

EARLY MASONRY IN EASTERN ONTARIO 

by 

V. W.BRO. D.J. WOODSIDE 

FOREWORD 

This paper will attempt to deal with a little more than the 
influence of United Empire Loyalists on the Early Development of 
Prince Edward District. More than U.E.L. people will be mentioned, 
and the area covered will include areas outside Prince Edward 
District. Much of the information has been obtained from a paper 
given at a regular meeting of The Heritage Lodge on March 21, 1979, 
by W.Bro. Allan J. Cohoe, entitled Some Early Masonic Activities 
in Upper Canada, which has been reproduced in the Proceedings of 
the Heritage Lodge, and from the Histories of Moira Lodge, No. 11, 
The Belleville Lodge No. 123, and Eureka Lodge, No. 283, all of 
which have been generously placed at my disposal. I assume that 
these histories have been rather readily available to most of you 
here this evening. In 'order not to be too repetitive, not to say 
boring, I have omitted much detail from these sources which might 
properly have been included. My other sources are mentioned in the 
bibliography which appears at the end of the paper. From all, 
selections have been copied or adapted. 

It has been found, as is often the case in such matters, that 
on occasion some of these sources differ in their statements. If 



- 23 - 



contradictions appear concerning some items, the truth may lie with 
either of two concepts, or it may lie between them. 



Seven essentially military lodges, holding Field or Travelling 
Warrants, met and celebrated St. John's Day in Quebec in December, 
17 59, after the War, and made plans for the formation of a Provincial 
Grand Lodge of Quebec. Occasionally these military lodges initiated 
non-military candidates, and some lodges were formed in the area 
west of the Ottawa river, which became Upper Canada in 17 91. 
United Empire Loyalists were Canadian settlers, who, loyal to the 
British cause in the American Revolution, migrated to Canada from 
the Thirteen Colonies. The greatest number left the colonies in 
1783-84. Most went to Nova Scotia and Quebec, but many also settled 
along the St. Lawrence River in what is now Ontario. Many of these 
were Masons, some from English lodges, many from American lodges. 
The military men were moved about the country by their units, as 
they carried out military duties, including surveys of the areas 
to be settled. This accounts for the fact that some Masons were 
found in more than one lodge. 

The Provincial Grand Lodge of Quebec, which derived its authority 
from the Grand Lodge of England (Moderns) warranted the following 
lodges in Upper Canada: 

No. 11 - St. John's Lodge of Friendship, Niagara, in 1780 

No. 14 - St. James Lodge, Cataraqui , in 1781 

No. 15 - St. John's Lodge, Mackinaw, in 1782 

No. 19 - St. John's Lodge, Niagara, in 1787 

No. 21 - Union Lodge, Cornwall, in 1790. 

There was also Rawdon Lodge, which derived its warrant direct from 
London in 1792. In 1792 William Jarvis was appointed Provincial 
Grand Master of Upper Canada by the Athol Grand Lodge of England, 
and after that date lodges in this area were warranted by this Grand 
Lodge, until 1804. After that date any lodges warranted were by 
the Schismatic Grand Lodge at Newark, until 1822. 

The British Regiments were moved about, and Masonry went with 
them. Captain John Walden Meyers was made a Mason in St. Andrews 
Lodge No. 2 at Quebec City in the year 1780, under the Grand Lodge 
of Quebec. This was a Provincial Grand Lodge, as mentioned above. 
Captain Meyers was also a charter member of St. James Lodge No. 
14, at Kingston, Ontario, whose charter was awarded in 1791. It 
was the first Masonic Lodge to be active in Kingston. 

Captain Meyers was Senior Warden of St. James Lodge when it 
was chartered. He was a farmer, born in New York State, near Albany, 
and was about 28 when he came to Kingston. By 1787 he had moved to 
Thurlow Township, and then settled in Sydney Township. He was a 
bold man, but honest, and with limited education. He built the 
first mill between Napanee and Toronto. He operated a sawmill, 
trading post, distillery, and a brick kiln, and built the first 
brick house in Upper Canada. He constructed boats, was a justice 
of the peace and a captain in the militia. He was the first Master 
of Thurlow Lodge No. 17, and again in 1802. It later became Moira 
Lodge No. 17, and is now Moira Lodge No. 11, Belleville. 

The charter members of St. James Lodge, Kingston, were Major 
James Rogers, Capt. John W. Meyers, Lieut. William Buell, Captain 
Ozariah Pritchard, Lieut. Solomon Jones, James Taylor, James Ferguson, 
and William Marsh. Of these, William Buell and Solomon Jones, at 
least, later settled near Brockville, Buell upon what is now the 



- 24 - 

central portion of the City of Brockville, and Dr. Solomon Jones 
at a point about two miles east of Maitland. More about their 
Masonic activities in the Brockville area will come later. St. 
James Lodge lapsed in 1787, which was known as the hungry year, 
when crops failed and food was scarce. 

On March 10, 1801, Thurlow Lodge No. 17 was constituted under 
dispensation, with Capt. John W. Meyers as its master. The first 
meeting was held at Myer's Creek, now Belleville, near the mouth 
of the Sagonaska River, now the Moira. The lodge later became 
Moira Lodge No. 11. Thurlow Lodge No. 17 was the first lodge in 
the area of Hastings and Prince Edward counties. 

In 1802 a petition was submitted for a lodge at Ernestown 
(Bath). It was to be named St. John's. Two years later, in 1804, 
it was constituted as No. 13, and became known as Addington Lodge. 
Henry Finkle of Ernestown, one of the petitioners for it, is 
credited with building the first lodge hall. 

New Oswegatchie Lodge was warranted as No. 7 on May 7, 17 83, 
by the Provincial Grand Lodge of New York, and seems to have first 
met in the Loyal American Regiment and afterwards to have had its 
headquarters at Ogdensburg, which still remained a British posses- 
sion. About 1787 the headquarters was transferred to the northern 
shore of the St. Lawrence. Of the meetings held between 1783 and 
1787 there is no record, but the minute book of the old lodge, which 
was found in the County of Leeds in 1889, gives a complete record 
of the communications held from 1787 to 17 91. 

The minutes of the first recorded meeting are as follows: 

"Tuesday, October 10th, 1787, New Oswegatchie Lodge assembled 
at the house of Ensign Thomas Sherwood, in Elizabethtown, and 
opened in due form at 6 o'clock, P.M. 

"Present: John Jones, Esq., Master, Ensign William Buell, Sen. 
Warden, Broth Caleb Closson, as Junior Warden, Ensign David Break- 
enridge, acting Secre'y, Brother George Campbell, acting Tyler, 
Capt. Samuel Wright, Ensign Thomas Sherwood, Brother Jeremiah 
McArthur, visitor. 

"Capt. James Breakenridge, by peition, proposed himself as a 
candidate, was balloted for, and two negatives appeared against him; 
Lieut. Alex Campbell, proposed himself as a candidate by petition, 
was balloted for, and unaminously accepted. At 10 o'clock, business 
being completed, the Lodge was closed in due form." 

The house of Thomas Sherwood was situated upon Lot No. 1, 
Concession No. 1, Elizabethtown, and is authoritatively stated to 
have been the first dwelling erected in the County of Leeds. There- 
after the lodge met at various houses in Elizabethtown and once in 
Augusta. It will be noticed that, although the war had been concluded 
some years previously, the half -pay officers clung to their military 
titles. 

On September 8, 178*9, a member of the Lodge was brough to trial 
on complaint of Br. Henry Larne that he "owed him for hay, which 
was to be paid in flour at four dollars per hundred weight, who 
was disciplined by being ordered to pay his debt to Larne, to pay 
up his arrears to the Lodge immediately and then to stand suspended 
for six months." ♦ 

The members of the New Oswegatchie Lodge were the following: 
William Buell, David Breakenridge, Elijah Bottum, Bemsley Buell, 
Caleb Clauson, George Campbell, Bartholomew Car ley, Lemuel Caswel, 



- 25 - 



Henry Cross, Daniel Dunham, Nathaniel Hillyer, John Jones, Jeremiah 
McArthur, Ziba Phillips, Thomas Sherwood, Thomas Smyth, Francis 
Scott, Asa Starkweather, William Samson, Samuel Wright, John White, 
Samuel Wilson, William Warn. They may justly be described as the 
founders of Masonry in the Brockville district. 

Fraternally the most prominent of the members of this early 
lodge became Ziba Marcus Phillips, styled "Doctor", although not 
licensed to practice by the Medical Board of Upper Canada. An 
obituary notice which appeared in the Brockville Statesman at the 
time of his death in 1847, states that "although denied the advant- 
ages of erudition, his society was particularly agreeable." He 
was born in Oswego, N.Y., came to this country as a youth, and 
later fought during the war of 1812. Subsequently he commanded 
both the 3rd and 4th battalions of Grenville Militia. In 1905 
John Ross Robertson referred to him as "the most energetic Freemason 
in Upper Canada from 1816 to 1845." and, indeed., his efforts are 
said to have saved the Craft from disaster at one period. In 1822 - 
1847 he was Deputy Provincial Grand Master and his services to the 
Craft were prized so highly by his successors that in 1908 a tablet 
to his memory was unveled in St. Peter's Anglican Church, Brockville, 
where he had been a worshiper. 

The masters of New Oswegatchie Lodge from 1787 to 1791 were the 
following: 1787 - John Jones; 1788 - William Buell; 1789 - Justus 
Sherwood and Thomas Sherwood; 1790 - Elijah Bottum and Thomas 
Sherwood; 1791 - Ziba M. Phillips. 

William Buell, who links the St. James' Lodge of Kingston with 
Sussex Lodge of Brockville, having been a member of both of them, 
was a lieutenant in the King's Rangers. He was a generous community 
citizen, donating lots for a courthouse, for a jail, and for three 
churches. He started the first school in the area, setting aside 
one room in his house for that purpose. He is commemorated by a 
street in Brockville, named Buell Street. 

Between 1791 and 1817 there is a lapse of time without record 
of any lodge having worked in Brockville or in its immediate vicinity 
On December 22, 1817, however, according to an old minute book, a 
meeting was called at Brockville for the purpose of opening a lodge 
on Warrant No. 3, and electing officers for the ensuing six months. 
This warrant had been originally issued in 1792 to the Queen's 
Rangers at Niagara, and after their disbandment taken to Cornwall. 
Thence it appears to have been transferred to Brockville where the 
lodge continued to hold regular communications until 1872. Eighteen 
members were present at the meeting held "at Stephen Cromwell's" 
on December 22, 1817, at 6 o'clock p.m. and included Dr. Ziba M. 
Phillips, its first master. During the period 1817 - 1822, the lodge 
met as "Lodge No. 3", or "Brockville Lodge No. 3." On September 21, 
1822, the Provincial Grand Master issued a dispensation, under which 
the title was set as "Sussex Lodge No. 3", after H.R.H. the Duke 
of Sussex, Grand Master. The lodge was numbered 756 on the English 
register. 

Since 1852 Sussex Lodge has continued to work without interrup- 
tion, and from 1859 as No. 5. 

Sussex Lodge is one of four lodges which have been permitted, 
by resolutions of Grand Lodge, to wear gold fringe on their aprons 
and to work with gold jewels, in recognition of their rank in the 
Craft and their service to Masonry in this jurisdiction. The other 
lodges so honoured are Niagara No. 2, the Ancient St. John's, No. 3, 
and the Barton Lodge, No. 6. 



26 



BIBLIOGRAPHY 

Some Early Masonic Activities in Upper Canada - Allan J. Cohoe 
The Heritage Lodge Proceedings, May 1979. 

Moira Lodge No. 11, A.F. & A.M. History - H.S. Robbins 

Centennial - The Belleville Lodge, No. 123 - H.J. Clarke 

History - Eureka Lodge, A.F. & A.M. No. 283 - W. Oliver 

Freemasonry in Upper Canada and the 1812 War - J.E. Taylor - 
Ars Quatuor Coonatorum, Vol. 73. 

A History of the Grand Lodge, A.F. & A.M. in the Province of 
Ontario - Herrington & Fonley. 

Sussex Lodge, No. 5, A.F. & A.M. - .E. Keene. 

CLOSE THE LODGE 

Following a brief discussion, R.W.Bro. Flynn thanked V.W.Bro. 
Woodside for a fine address and returned the gavel to W.Bro. Dafoe 
who also thanked Bro. Woodside for his interesting record of the 
historical events in Freemasonry in Prince Edward County and the 
surrounding area. After a few announcements from R.W.Bro. R.M. 
Gunsolus, Secretary of The Belleville Lodge, the Lodge was closed 
in harmony at 19:45 p.m. and the Brethren adjourned to the Banquet 
Hall for a social period and refreshments. 

COMING EVENTS 

JULY 18-19th, 1979 (Wednesday & Thursday) - The 124th Annual 
Communication of Grand Lodge A.F. & A.M. of Canada in the 
Province of Ontario, Toronto, Ontario. Grand Master's Banquet, 
Wednesday evening. 

AUGUST 29th, 1979 (Wednesday) at 7:30 p.m., Preston-Hespeler Masonic 
Temple - Meeting of the Committee of General Purposes of The 
Heritage Lodge. 

SEPTEMBER 15th, 1979 (Saturday) - The 18th Century Degree Cast of 
Wellington District will be visiting a combined meeting of 
four Kingston Lodges in Kingston, to dramatize a typical 18th 
Century Lodge Meeting and Initiation Ceremony. 

SEPTEMBER 17th, 1979 (Monday) - Meeting of New Hope Lodge No. 279, 
Preston-Hespeler Masonic Temple. A special event of the 
evening will be the presentation to R.W.Bro. William S. McVittie 
(Charter Member and Tyler of The Heritage Lodge No. 730) of 
his 50' years a Mason pin by the Grand Master. 

SEPTEMBER 19th, 1979 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage 
Lodge. Annual Elefction of Officers. Also, R.W.Bro. Wallace 
E. McLeod will present a paper titled "John Coustos - The 
Lisbon Inquisition" . 



- 27 



OCTOBER 3rd, 1979 (Wednesday) - Organization & Planning Meeting, 

Fourth Regional Masonic Workshop (1982), at 7:30 p.m., Preston- 
Hespeler Masonic Temple. 

NOVEMBER 21, 1979 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage 

Lodge. Annual Installation and Investiture of the Worshipful 
Master and the Officers of the Lodge. Also, W.Bro. Greg C. 
Robinson will present a paper titled "Morgan - The Canadian 
Connection" . 

MARCH 18, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 
R. W.Bro. Charles A. Sankey will present a paper which will be 
a condensation of Albert Pike's Papers on the First Three 
Degrees of Masonry. The correct title has yet to be decided. 

MAY 21, 1980 (Wednesday) - Regular Meeting of The Heritage Lodge. 
Bro. John E. Taylor will present a paper titled "The Lodge 
Room, Lodge Furniture, Regalia and other Masonic matters". 
Bro. Taylor is a recipient of the coveted William Mercer Wilson 
Medal, and the first person to receive it for Academic contri- 
butions to Masonic Research. 



Other Historical Masonic Papers to be presented at future 
meetings include: 

1. Quasi Masonic Bodies not recognized by Grand Lodge; for 
example: Chinese Masons, Red Cross of Rome and Constantine, 
Rosicrucians, Prince Hall Masons etc. 

2. Grand Lodge of Canada in the Province of Ontario - Lodges 
formerly on the Register and now struck off, by Bro. John 
E. Taylor. 

3. A review of important similarities of our Grand Masters. 

4. Women Freemasons in Ontario. 

5. The Masonic Career of Captain Joseph Brant-Mohawk Indian 
Chief by V. W.Bro. J. Pos. 

NOTE - If you have any suggestions for titles of masonic papers, 
or if you would like to prepare a paper for presentation, 
or if you would like to review any of the papers before they 
are presented in Lodge, please contact the Editor or the 
Chairman of the Committee on Masonic Information. 



WORDS OF WISDOM 



If one lives with criticism, he learns to condemn. 
If one lives with hostility, he learns to fight. 
If one lives with ridicule, he learns to withdraw. 
If one lives with shame, he learns to feel guilty. 
There are the negative influences. 

If one lives with tolerance, he learns patience. 

If one lives with encouragement, he learns confidence. 

If one lives with praise, he learns to appreciate. 

If one lives with fairness, he learns justice. 

If one lives with security, he learns to have faith. 

If one lives with approval, he learns to like himself. 

If one lives with acceptance and friendship, he learns to find love 

These are the positive forces for good in the world. 



28 - 



GRAND LODGE OFFICERS 
1979 - 1980 

THE MOST WORSHIPFUL THE GRAND MASTER 

M.W.Bro. Nerval Richard Richards 

59 Green St., Guelph, N1H 2H4 

DEPUTY GRAND MASTER 

R.W.Bro. Howard 0. Polk 

892 Aaron Ave., Ottawa, K2A 3P3 

GRAND SECRETARY 
M.W.Bro. J. A. Irvine 
Drawer 217, Hamilton, L8N 3C9 

DISTRICT DEPUTY GRAND MASTER, WATERLOO DISTRICT 

R.W.Bro. Lewis Hahn 

75 York St., Kitchener, N2G 1T5 



LODGE OFFICERS 
1979 



W.M. 
I. P.M. 
S.W. 
J.W. 
S.D. 
J.D. 
I.G. 
S.S. 



R.W.Bro, 
V.W.Bro, 
R.W.Bro, 
R.W.Bro, 
W.Bro, 
W.Bro, 
R.W.Bro. 
R.W.Bro. 



Keith R.A. Flynn 
Jacob Pos 
Donald S. Grinton 
Ronald E. Groshaw 
George E. Zwicker 
Balfour LeGresley 
David C. Bradley 



J.S. 

Tyler 

Sec'y 

A/Sec 'y 

Treas . 

D.C. 

Chap. 



Charles Edwin Drew Organist R 



. W.Bro. Robert Carpenter 

W.Bro. Wm.S. McVittie 

W.Bro. James A. Faulkner 

W.Bro. Joseph J. Vliehs 

W.Bro. W.E. Wilson 

W.Bro. Roy S. Sparrow 

Bro. Rev. W.G. Rivers 

W.Bro. L.R. Hertel 



COMMITTEES FOR 1979 
GENERAL PURPOSE - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Donald Grinton, (S.W.), all 

Chairmen of Lodge Committees, Officers and Past Masters. 
VISITATION & TRANSPORTATION - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ronald Groshaw,(J.W ), 

W.Bro. George Zwicker, (S.D.), and W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley. 
MEMBERSHIP & UNATTACHED MASONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. Ed Raich- W Bro 

George Zwicker, (S.D.), V.W.Bro. Stewart Thur?eilfw BrS 'fierf 

Mennie, and R.W.Bro. Robert Throop. erx 

REFRESHMENT ft ENTERTAINMENT - Chairman, R.W.Bro. C.E. Drew, (S.S.), 
nA^?H°v R S bert garpenter, U.S.), Local Co-Chairman, W Bro. 
Donald Kaufman, Bro. John Jones and Bro. Richard Zimmerman. 

^SrraT^o. ?^^,!-"- 2 "- W"^ H.W.Bro. Frank 

MASONIC MUSEUM - Chairman, V.W.Bro. Jacob Pos, R.W.Bro. Wallace E 
McLeod, and R.W.Bro. John C. Woodburn. e *" 

^TwT -Chairman, W.Bro. Balfour LeGresley, R.W.Bro. Frank 
Bruce, R.W.Bro. James Gerrard, R.W.Bro. David Bradley, R.W Bro 

Kernel Ba^tleU! ,W,Br0 ' JaC ° b p08 ' W * Br0 ' P * Ul En ^ ; «* *£ 

LODGE LIBRARY - Chairman, Bro 
and W.Bro. Donald Kaufman. 

LODGE PUBLICATIONS - Chairman, R.W.Bro. David Bradley, R.W.Bro Edsel 
Steen, and R.W.Bro. Charles Sankey. n.".*ro. aasei 

NOTE - Where the Lodge Office appears after a Brother's name, this 
is an automatic appointment as defined by the Lodge Bv-Laws The 
duties of all Lodge Committees are outlined in Article Vm! 
bections 1 to 11. Please note requirements for an annual budget. 



Rev. Gray Rivers, R.W.Bro. Roy Sparrow,